Mar 7, 2021
Our Daily Bread! – Deric Bartlett
This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Our Daily Bread!' based on Mark 8:1-21.
 
1. God has a plan to ___________________ (v. 1-10)
2. You can refuse to eat the _____________________ (v. 11-13)
3.  You have to learn to digest your _______________________  (v. 14-21
 
 

ICEBREAKER: What skill or talent would you most like to learn?


1. Why do you think Jesus miraculously fed the 5000 in Mark 6:35-44, and then repeated it by feeding the 4000 in Mark 8:1-9? Why was this such an important lesson for His disciples to grasp [Mark 8:16-21]? Consider also Isaiah 6:8-13; Matthew 13:10-17; and Hebrews 5:11-14.

2. Mark 8:11 tells us the Pharisees came to Jesus asking for a sign from heaven. But Mark’s Gospel to this point has recorded numerous miracles of healings, feedings, and exorcisms among others. What does this indicate about the religious leaders’ hearts [cf. Matthew 16:1-4; Luke 11:14-23; and 1 Corinthians 1:18-25]?

3. What does Jesus’ reaction to the Pharisees’ demand in Mark 8:12 indicate about His humanity, as well as the condition of people’s hearts [cf. Isaiah 53:1-4; Mark 6:1-6; and Luke 19:41-44?

4. Why do you think Jesus unfavourably compared the teachings of the Pharisees and Herod’s politics to leaven [cf. Matthew 16:11-12; Luke 12:1-3; and 1 Corinthians 5:6-8]?

5. Mark’s Gospel clearly recorded the disciples’ frequent misunderstanding of Jesus’ miracles and teachings. How do their struggles encourage you to continue striving to understand and live as a disciple today [cf. Matthew 6:25-34; Matthew 14:28-31; and Matthew 16:8]?

6. The disciples were thinking literally whereas Jesus was thinking figuratively when He mentioned the bread and the leaven [Mark 8:14-18]. Why do you think Jesus employed analogies or word pictures to convey spiritual truth [cf. John 3:1-7; John 4:7-15; and John 7:37-39?

7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

“Jesus did not come into the world mainly to give bread, but to be bread. ‘I am the bread of life. He who comes to me will not hunger. He who believes in me will never thirst’ (John 6:35)…Now he is going to give bread and you can miss it by thinking that is the main thing he came to do. But that is not the main reason he came. You have already had a lot of bread taken out of your hands. And I hope it lands on you with massive good news that he came to be bread, not mainly give bread. He has got to take bread out of a lot of people’s hands so that they will trust him as the bread.” (John Piper)

WatchNotesDownloadDateTitle
  • Mar 7, 2021Our Daily Bread! – Deric Bartlett
    Mar 7, 2021
    Our Daily Bread! – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Our Daily Bread!' based on Mark 8:1-21.
     
    1. God has a plan to ___________________ (v. 1-10)
    2. You can refuse to eat the _____________________ (v. 11-13)
    3.  You have to learn to digest your _______________________  (v. 14-21
     
     

    ICEBREAKER: What skill or talent would you most like to learn?


    1. Why do you think Jesus miraculously fed the 5000 in Mark 6:35-44, and then repeated it by feeding the 4000 in Mark 8:1-9? Why was this such an important lesson for His disciples to grasp [Mark 8:16-21]? Consider also Isaiah 6:8-13; Matthew 13:10-17; and Hebrews 5:11-14.

    2. Mark 8:11 tells us the Pharisees came to Jesus asking for a sign from heaven. But Mark’s Gospel to this point has recorded numerous miracles of healings, feedings, and exorcisms among others. What does this indicate about the religious leaders’ hearts [cf. Matthew 16:1-4; Luke 11:14-23; and 1 Corinthians 1:18-25]?

    3. What does Jesus’ reaction to the Pharisees’ demand in Mark 8:12 indicate about His humanity, as well as the condition of people’s hearts [cf. Isaiah 53:1-4; Mark 6:1-6; and Luke 19:41-44?

    4. Why do you think Jesus unfavourably compared the teachings of the Pharisees and Herod’s politics to leaven [cf. Matthew 16:11-12; Luke 12:1-3; and 1 Corinthians 5:6-8]?

    5. Mark’s Gospel clearly recorded the disciples’ frequent misunderstanding of Jesus’ miracles and teachings. How do their struggles encourage you to continue striving to understand and live as a disciple today [cf. Matthew 6:25-34; Matthew 14:28-31; and Matthew 16:8]?

    6. The disciples were thinking literally whereas Jesus was thinking figuratively when He mentioned the bread and the leaven [Mark 8:14-18]. Why do you think Jesus employed analogies or word pictures to convey spiritual truth [cf. John 3:1-7; John 4:7-15; and John 7:37-39?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Jesus did not come into the world mainly to give bread, but to be bread. ‘I am the bread of life. He who comes to me will not hunger. He who believes in me will never thirst’ (John 6:35)…Now he is going to give bread and you can miss it by thinking that is the main thing he came to do. But that is not the main reason he came. You have already had a lot of bread taken out of your hands. And I hope it lands on you with massive good news that he came to be bread, not mainly give bread. He has got to take bread out of a lot of people’s hands so that they will trust him as the bread.” (John Piper)

  • Feb 28, 2021The Paradise of God – Deric Bartlett
    Feb 28, 2021
    The Paradise of God – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Paradise of God' based on Mark 7:1-23.
     
    1. Elevate tradition over __________: v. 1-5 
    2. Value appearance over ___________: v. 6-7 
    3. Observe legalism over _____________: v. 8-13
    4. Choose compliance over ______________: v. 14 & 18 
    5. Trust law over ________________: v. 15-23
    ICEBREAKER: How handy are you when it comes to fixing things?
    1. The religious leaders of Jesus’ day would have felt right at home during our pandemic with their emphasis on washing [Mark 7:1-4].  Why did their cleansing activities upset Jesus [cf. Matthew 23:25; Acts 10:28; and Colossians 2:8]? 2. The religious leaders were good at judging others but not so good at judging themselves [Mark 7:5]. Why is judging others so dangerous [cf. Matthew 7:1-5; Romans 2:1-11; and James 4:11-12]? 3. Why is hypocrisy a particularly heinous sin [Mark 7:6-8]? Consult Matthew 23:27-28; Luke 13:10-17; and Galatians 2:11-13 for more insights. 4. Having traditions is not necessarily evil [cf. 1 Corinthians 11:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:15]. Why was Jesus taking issue with the traditions of the religious leaders [Mark 7:9-13]? Look up Proverbs 28:24; Matthew 23:23-26; and Galatians 1:14 for further clues. 5. Why are outward appearances poor indicators of a person’s spirituality [Mark 7:17-19]? Consider also 1 Samuel 16:6-7; 1 Chronicles 28:9; and Luke 16:15. 6. Jesus cut to the heart of the matter by stating that defilement derives from a person’s heart [Mark 7:20-23]. What can be done to cleanse a defiled heart [cf. Psalm 51:10, 17; Ezekiel 36:26; and Acts 15:9]? 7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
    “Hypocrisy can plunge the mind of a man into a dark abyss, when he believes his own self-flattery instead of God’s verdict.” (John Calvin)
  • Feb 21, 2021This Man Walks on Water – Max Oates
    Feb 21, 2021
    This Man Walks on Water – Max Oates
    This week, Pastor Max continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'This Man Walks on Water' based on Mark 6:45-52.
     
    1. The battle is not for kingdoms, but for souls. (v. 45 – 48a)
     
    2. The hero is not just a man, but God Himself. (v. 48b – 50)
     
    3. The risk is not in the storm, but in the heart. (v. 52)
     
    ICEBREAKER: What is the best location to fully enjoy a good cup of coffee?
     
    1. One of the most astonishing aspects of Jesus’ earthly life was His practice of prayer [Mark 6:46]. Why do you think Jesus prayed, and how does this impact your prayer life [cf. Matthew 26:36-44; Mark 1:35; Luke 5:16; and John 17:1-26]?
    2. Amid growing opposition to Jesus, and following a day of exhausting ministry, how does the description of the contrary wind and the disciples’ difficult lake crossing [Mark 6:48] contribute to Mark’s portrayal of discipleship [cf. Matthew 8:18-22; Matthew 19:16-22; and Luke 9:23-26]?
    3. What does the miracle of Jesus walking on the rough, windblown waters to be with His disciples reveal about Jesus [Mark 6:48]? Consider also John 1:1-5; 1 Corinthians 8:4-6; and Colossians 1:15-17.
    4. Apparently, first century people also believed in the paranormal as in our day, for the disciples feared the one walking on the water was a ghost [Mark 6:49]. What should believers think about the paranormal [cf. Deuteronomy 18:9-14; 1 Samuel 28:3-20; and Isaiah 8:19]?
    5. Whether your fears are well-founded or irrational, how are Jesus’ words in Mark 6:50 bringing you comfort and peace in these troubled times [cf. Exodus 14:13-14; Isaiah 41:13; Isaiah 43:1-2; and John 16:33]?
    6. In Mark 6:51-52, why does Mark expose the disciples’ lack of understanding and hard-heartedness with regard to the loaves? How are the miracles of the feeding of the 5000 and Jesus’ walking on water related? What was the lesson of the loaves that they were failing to grasp [cf. Mark 2:1-12; Mark 4:35-41; Mark 6:30-44; and John 6:14]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “If God be our God, He will give us peace in trouble. When there is a storm without, He will make peace within. The world can create trouble in peace, but God can create peace in trouble.” (Thomas Watson)

  • Feb 14, 2021The Master’s Math Lesson – Brad Lehman
    Feb 14, 2021
    The Master’s Math Lesson – Brad Lehman
    This week, Pastor Brad continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Master's Math Lesson: The Feeding of the 5000' based on Mark 6:30-44.
    1. Prioritize rest to recharge your reserves [Mark 6:30-32].
    2. Pray for a compassionate heart for others [Mark 6:33-36].
    3. Exhaust your human resources [Mark 6:37-38].
    4. Let your Master do the math [Mark 6:39-44].
    5. Meager resources grow exponentially when entrusted to Jesus.
    ICEBREAKER: How into self-improvement are you? In what areas?
    1. Why is rest so essential for followers of Jesus [Mark 6:31]? How are you incorporating rest into your regular routine [cf. Genesis 2:1-3; Mark 1:35; and Luke 5:16]?
    2. What does compassion look like in practical terms, and how does a follower of Jesus develop it [Mark 6:34]? Examine Luke 7:11-15; Luke 15:20-24; and Colossians 3:12-15 for more ideas.
    3. Why do sheep require a shepherd [Mark 6:34]? Why does Jesus uniquely qualify to be our Shepherd [cf. Psalm 23; Ezekiel 34:1-16; and John 10:1-18]?
    4. Why do you think God sometimes gives seemingly impossible assignments to His people [Mark 6:37]? What do these assignments require of us? What do they require of God [cf. Exodus 3:7-22; Numbers 11:10-23; and Matthew 19:23-26]?
    5. Children played significant roles in Jesus’ earthly ministry [Mark 6:38; cf. John 6:9]. Why do you think this was so [cf. Matthew 18:1-4; Mark 10:13-16; and Luke 9:46-48]?
    6. What did the beheading of John the Baptist [Mark 6:24-29] forebode for Jesus? Why is following Jesus costly? Do you believe Jesus is worth suffering for? Why or why not? [cf. Luke 9:23-26; John 12:25-26; and Revelation 12:11]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
    “Compassion asks us to go where it hurts, to enter into the places of pain, to share in brokenness, fear, confusion, and anguish. Compassion challenges us to cry out with those in misery, to mourn with those who are lonely, to weep with those in tears. Compassion requires us to be weak with the weak, vulnerable with the vulnerable, and powerless with the powerless. Compassion means full immersion in the condition of being human.” (Henri J.M. Nouwen)
  • Feb 7, 2021The Reward for Following Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    Feb 7, 2021
    The Reward for Following Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric resumes the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Reward for Following Jesus' based on Mark 6:14-29.
     
    1. Unstoppable momentum: v. 14
    2. Unending controversies: v. 14 – 15
    3. Unavoidable grudges: v. 16 – 20
    4. Inevitable suffering: v. 21-28
    5. Loyalty, Rest and Eternal Life: v. 29

    ICEBREAKER: What is the weirdest way you have met someone?

    1. What does the report that Jesus’ name had become well known even to an unbelieving politician like Herod tell you about the reality of Jesus’ earthly life and ministry [Mark 6:14]? Consider also Isaiah 61:1-3; Luke 23:6-12; and Acts 4:23-28.
    2. Several possibilities were offered as to Jesus’ identity in Mark 6:14-16. What do these opinions indicate about Jesus, and why does it matter [cf. Matthew 4:23-25; Matthew 11:2-6; and Luke 7:16-17]?
    3. What do you learn about the potential consequences of addressing a culture’s blatant immorality from the experience of John the Baptist [Mark 6:17-19]? What are the potential consequences of not addressing it [cf. Romans 1:24-32; Ephesians 4:17-19; and 1 Peter 4:3-5]?
    4. Herod was portrayed as a deeply conflicted person in Mark 6:19-20. What do you think was going on in his heart that should be avoided [cf. Romans 2:14-16; 2 Corinthians 4:4; and Titus 3:3]?
    5. Herod made a rash promise for all the wrong reasons [Mark 6:21-23]. What errors in his judgment can you list which can help you escape his foolhardiness [cf. Proverbs 17:27-28; Proverbs 29:20; and Ecclesiastes 5:1-2]?
    6. What did the beheading of John the Baptist [Mark 6:24-29] forebode for Jesus? Why is following Jesus costly? Do you believe Jesus is worth suffering for? Why or why not? [cf. Luke 9:23-26; John 12:25-26; and Revelation 12:11]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
  • Jan 31, 2021Offended by Jesus Because of Unbelief – Deric Bartlett
    Jan 31, 2021
    Offended by Jesus Because of Unbelief – Deric Bartlett

    This week, Pastor Deric resumes the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Offended at Jesus Because of Unbelief' based on Mark 6:1-13.

    I.     We can reject Jesus by being offended (v. 1-13)

    1)   “they took offense” at Jesus  (v. 1-3) 

    2)   “they took offense” at His choice of apostles (v. 7-11)

    3)   “they took offense” at His call for repentance (v. 12-13)

    II    We can restrict Jesus by unbelief (v. 4-6)

    ICEBREAKER: What is the most amazing fact you know?

    1.Jesus received a rather cool reception from the people of his hometown, Nazareth. With this in mind, how do their hostile questions unintentionally help to authenticate Jesus’ life and ministry [Mark 6:1-2]? Examine also Luke 11:14-23; John 3:1-7; and John 8:48-59.

    2.What do you learn about Jesus’ family from Mark 6:3? What do you imagine it would have been like to grow up with Jesus as your eldest sibling [cf. Matthew 12:46-50; Luke 2:41-51; and John 7:1-9]?

    3.Why do you think “a prophet is not without honour, except in his hometown and among his relatives and in his own household” [Mark 6:4]? What emotions do you think Jesus was feeling when He made this comment [cf. Matthew 14:28-31; Matthew 23:37-39; and Luke 23:34]?

    4.From Mark 6:1-6, what are some of the consequences of unbelief that must be avoided [cf. Mark 9:14-24; Acts 19:8-10; and Romans 11:17-24]?

    5.How would you apply Jesus’ method of disciple-making from Mark 6:7-9 to today [cf. Matthew 28:19-20; Luke 10:1-12; and John 4:31-38]?

    6.What remedies are available for hearts hardened to the gospel [cf. Ezekiel 3:4-11; John 12:36-43; and Romans 2:1-11]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Christ never failed to distinguish between doubt and unbelief. Doubt is can’t believe. Unbelief is won’t believe. Doubt is honesty. Unbelief is obstinacy. Doubt is looking for light. Unbelief is content with darkness.” (Henry Drummond)

  • Jan 24, 2021Tracking with Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    Jan 24, 2021
    Tracking with Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric resumes the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Tracking with Jesus' based on Mark 5:21-43.

    1.  Jesus is accessible to a crushing crowd (v. 21,24) 
    2.  Jesus is approachable to a ruler of a synagogue (v. 22-24)  
    3.  Jesus is responsive to an unwell, unclean woman (v. 25-34)
    4.  Jesus is focused with the disciples (v. 37)
    5.  Jesus is unmoved by the mockery of unbelief (v. 40)
    6. Jesus is new life to all who believe in Him (v. 41- 42)


    ICEBREAKER:
    What is a problem you have that might be entirely unique to you?

    1.Mark recorded three stories in rapid succession in which three people fell before Jesus [Mark 5:6, 22, 33]. What does this action indicate about these three individuals? What does it indicate about Jesus [cf. Esther 8:3; Luke 5:8-10; and Revelation 1:17-18]?

    2.All parents experience a sense of panic and powerlessness when their children are gravely ill. Jairus suffered anguish while his beloved daughter suffered illness [Mark 5:23]. What is noteworthy about this father’s approach to Jesus? And what does it say about Jesus that He went with him [Mark 5:24]? Consider also Psalm 103:8-14; Matthew 15:29-32; and Hebrews 4:15-16.

    3.After reading the description of the hemorrhaging woman’s plight in Mark 5:25-26, what do you suspect was her mental and emotional state? Why do you think she attempted to touch Jesus’ garments undetected [Mark 5:27-28]? Look up Leviticus 15:25-27; Matthew 14:35-36; and Luke 8:43-44 for more clues.

    4.Why do you think Jesus asked, “Who touched my garments?” in Mark 5:30? What was His purpose in calling out the distressed woman [Mark 5:33-34]? Consult also Luke 17:15-19; Luke 18:35-43; and Luke 19:37-38.

    5.While pondering the story in Mark 5:35-43, how do Jesus’ words recorded in Mark 5:36 and 39 break the seeming inevitability and finality of death [cf. Mark 9:23; John 5:25-29; John 11:11-15; and 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18]?

    6.Note the contrast between Jesus’ words and everyone else’s in Mark 5:35-43. What is the difference? How does this encourage you to take Jesus’ words to heart, “Do not fear, only believe” [cf. Matthew 8:13; John 11:25-26; and John 14:1-7]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Affliction brings out graces that cannot be seen in a time of health. It is the treading of the grapes that brings out the sweet juices of the vine; so it is affliction that draws forth submission, weanedness from the world, and complete rest in God. Use afflictions while you have them.” (Robert Murray McCheyne)

  • Jan 17, 2021Men, Monsters & Miracles – Deric Bartlett
    Jan 17, 2021
    Men, Monsters & Miracles – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric resumes the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Men, Monsters & Miracles' based on Mark 5:1-20.

    1. The MAN who lived in a grave with an evil spirit
    2. The MONSTERS who have to be evicted
    3. The MASTER who sends us back home “clothed and in our right minds”
    4. The MOB who evicts Jesus from their lives

    ICEBREAKER: Where are five places you really want to visit before you die?

    1.Mark portrayed Jesus as full of action and authority. In context, He commanded the wind and waves, and they obeyed, leaving His disciples in awe [Mark 4:35-41]. He then commanded a legion of demons and they obeyed [Mark 5:6-13]. What do these stories tell you about Jesus’ identity? Consider Luke 4:31-37; John 1:1-5; and Colossians 1:16 for more insights.

    2.According to the Bible, unclean spirits exist [Mark 5:2]. A real, yet invisible world, is warring against the human race. How are believers to counter their evil influences [cf. Acts 26:18; Ephesians 6:10-20; James 4:7; and 1 Peter 5:8-9]?

    3.Mark 5:3-5 describes the utter brokenness and lostness of a person as far removed from God and others as possible. How is his wretchedness described? What does it say about Jesus that He invested time and energy in him? Consult Matthew 9:35-36; Luke 5:29-32; and Luke 19:10 for further ideas.

    4.The term “Legion” [Mark 5:9] means “thousands” and was used by the Romans for a military division. This name adds a sense of battle to the text, which, in fact, it was. What strategic lessons do you learn from Jesus’ interchange with the demonic horde [cf. 1 Corinthians 15:23-28; Colossians 2:15; and Hebrews 2:14-15]?

    5.Can you imagine witnessing a legion of unclean spirits possessing about 2000 “unclean” pigs and stampeding them down a sharp decline to drown in a sea [Mark 5:11-13]? This story vividly portrays the number, the influence, and the destructiveness of the demonic world. How do you personally resist such diabolical evil [cf. Romans 8:38-39; 2 Corinthians 2:11; and Ephesians 1:21-22]?

    6.The opposing responses to Jesus could not be in starker contrast. The crowds from the city and countryside feared, and asked Jesus to leave [Mark 5:15-17], showing their persistent brokenness. However, the broken man made whole asked to leave with Jesus but was commissioned to share his story with other broken people [Mark 5:19-20]. Who do you know that is broken and needs Jesus to make them whole [cf. John 4:25-30; John 7:37-38; John 8:12; and John 9:24-41]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “There are two equal and opposite errors into which our race can fall about the devils. One is to disbelieve in their existence. The other is to believe, and to feel an excessive and unhealthy interest in them. They themselves are equally pleased by both errors, and hail a materialist and a magician with the same delight.” (C.S. Lewis)
  • Jan 10, 2021Alone with Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    Jan 10, 2021
    Alone with Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric resumes the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Alone with Jesus' based on Mark 4:21-34
     
    1. Being alone with Jesus produces spiritual discernment: v. 1-20
    2. Being alone with Jesus produces spiritual light: v. 21-25
    3. Being alone with Jesus produces faith in God’s plan: v. 26-29
    4. Being alone with Jesus expands the kingdom of God on earth. v. 30-33
     
    ICEBREAKER: What do you resent paying for most?
     
    1.In the broader context, Jesus was speaking of “the secret of the kingdom of God” [Mark 4:11]. How do you think a lit lamp on a lampstand [Mark 4:21] illustrates Jesus and the kingdom of God [cf. Matthew 5:14-16; John 1:4-5; and John 8:12]?
     
    2.Jesus’ words, “If anyone has ears to hear, let him hear” [Mark 4:23] are actually a command. He is telling His hearers to “Listen up!” Why, according to Mark 4:24-25, should we listen to Christ and the message of God’s kingdom so attentively? How do we put this into practice [cf. Matthew 10:14; Matthew 17:5; and John 10:7-18]?
     
    3.According to Mark 4:26-29, what is humanity’s role in the kingdom of God, and what is God’s role? How does this influence the way you approach ministry today [cf. Matthew 16:18; 2 Corinthians 5:11; and Ephesians 2:19-22]?
     
    4.Why do you think Jesus asked His disciples the question of Mark 4:30? Why are earthly illustrations and comparisons so helpful for understanding spiritual truths [cf. Matthew 16:5-12; John 4:13-14; and 2 Timothy 2:3-7]?
     
    5.The parable of the mustard seed [Mark 4:31-32] indicated that Jesus’ ministry and the kingdom of God seemed insignificant at first but would eventually expand enormously. Why do you think God starts small to accomplish His great plans [cf. Deuteronomy 7:5-8; 2 Samuel 7:8; Matthew 15:32-39; and 1 Corinthians 1:26-29]?
     
    6.Jesus taught the crowds in parables, but to His disciples He gave fuller explanations [Mark 4:33-34]. How does this motivate you to spend more time and energy to be with Jesus and follow Him [cf. Luke 24:25-27; John 16:12-14; and Acts 4:13]?
     
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
    “The goal of sanctification is for God to set apart for Himself a ‘peculiar people’ who are marked by their love for God and a desire for His kingdom – a people who show that as much as they tell it. The Lord wants us to be a people who are a living foretaste of His coming kingdom.” (James Smith)
  • Nov 22, 2020Spiritual Farming 101 – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 22, 2020
    Spiritual Farming 101 – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Spiritual Farming 101' based on Mark 4:1-20

    1. Plant the imperishable seed  
    2. Work the invisible field of souls
    3. Reap the bounty of the abundant life


    ICEBREAKER:
    What wastes the most time in your day-to-day life?

    1. Why do you think Jesus used stories drawn from everyday life to communicate spiritual truths [Mark 4:1-9]? Why would agricultural metaphors speak powerfully to His audience? What do we learn from Jesus’ approach to help us communicate to our generation [cf. Matthew 4:18-20; John 6:35; and John 8:12]?

    2. According to Mark 4:10-12, what was the purpose of Jesus’ parables for His disciples, and then “for those outside” [cf. Matthew 11:25-27; Romans 16:25-27; and Colossians 1:24-27]?

    3. In Jesus’ parable, the sower and the seed remain consistent [Mark 4:14]. How does this impact how we go about our Christian mission in the world today [cf. Luke 1:1-4; Acts 5:17-20; and Acts 8:4]?

    4. Jesus affirmed the reality of Satan and that he aggressively opposes the work of God [Mark 4:15]. How does this affect our approach to sharing God’s Word [cf. 2 Corinthians 4:4; Ephesians 6:10-20, and 1 Peter 5:8]?

    5. Jesus listed, in Mark 4:16-19, some of the reasons people fall away from following Him. What are these reasons, and how can we address them [cf. Psalm 1:3; John 15:18-20; and 1 Timothy 6:6-10, 17-19]?

    6. The quality of the soil is the one changing factor in this parable of Jesus. How do you know God’s Word has fallen on good soil? What would that evidence look like [cf. John 15:1-11; Galatians 5:22-23; and Colossians 1:3-12]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “It is of no use for any of you to try to be soul-winners if you are not bearing fruit in your own lives. How can you serve the Lord with your lips if you do not serve Him with your lives? How can you preach His gospel with your tongues, when with hands, feet, and heart you are preaching the devil’s gospel, and setting up an antichrist by your practical unholiness?” (Charles Spurgeon)

  • Nov 15, 2020United in Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 15, 2020
    United in Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'United in Jesus' based on Mark 3:13-35.
     
    1. We share the same foundation; v. 13-21
    2. We share the same faith; v. 22-30
    3. We share the same family: v. 31-35

     

    ICEBREAKER: Who is the most intelligent or creative person you know?

    1. According to Mark 3:14-15, what were the three main responsibilities Jesus gave His apostles? How do we continue to live out these priorities today [cf. Matthew 28:18-20; Acts 4:13; and Romans 10:14-17]?

    2. What ministry principles do you learn from Jesus’ appointment of His 12 apostles [Mark 3:13-19]? Why do you think Jesus chose these specific individuals [cf. Matthew 4:18-22; John 1:35-51; and 2 Timothy 2:2]?

    3. Jesus’ family members weren’t overly supportive during His earthly ministry [Mark 3:20-21]. Why do you think they struggled to accept their elder Brother, and how does this encourage you when loved ones don’t support your Christian commitment [cf. Matthew 12:46-50; Matthew 13:53-58; and John 7:1-10]?

    4. How did Jesus counter the false allegation that He was casting out demons by Satan’s authority [Mark 3:22-27]? What does this indicate about the state of the religious leaders’ hearts [cf. Acts 19:8-9; Romans 1:21; and Ephesians 4:18]?

    5. In light of the context of Mark 3:28-30, what exactly is the “eternal sin” Jesus mentioned? How likely is it to be committed today [cf. John 12:36-43; 2 Corinthians 3:12-16; and Hebrews 3:12-19]?

    6. What do you learn about Jesus’ view of the family of God from His comments in Mark 3:31-35 [cf. Matthew 7:21; Luke 11:28, and 1 John 2:17]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Our relationship with each other is the criterion the world uses to judge whether our message is truthful - Christian community is the final apologetic.” (Francis Schaeffer)

  • Nov 8, 2020Stretch Out Your Hand to Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 8, 2020
    Stretch Out Your Hand to Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Stretch Out your Hand to Jesus' based on Mark 3:1-12.
     
    1. It was an act of faith
    2. It was an act of hope
    3. It was an act of controversy
    4. It was an act of courage

    ICEBREAKER: What is the best event you have attended? What made it so amazing?

    1.How did Jesus’ approach to the man with the withered hand differ from that of the religious leaders [Mark 3:1-5]? What does this tell you about Jesus? Consider also Psalm 37:32; Jeremiah 20:10; and Luke 20:20.

    2.How would you answer Jesus’ question in Mark 3:4? What does this indicate about the ultimate purpose of the Sabbath [cf. Exodus 20:7-11; Isaiah 58:13-14; and John 9:16]?

    3.Notice the intensity of emotion Jesus demonstrated in Mark 3:5. How does this further reveal both the full humanity and full deity of our Lord? Look up Matthew 8:23-27; John 2:13-17; and John 11:32-36 for more insights.

    4.Which was more serious: the withered hand or the hardened heart [Mark 3:3 & 5]? How can a hardened heart be softened [cf. Matthew 13:10-17; Romans 11:25-32; and Ephesians 4:17-24]?

    5.There is a stark contrast recorded between Mark 3:6 and Mark 3:7-8. The religious leaders conspired to destroy Jesus, while both Jews and Gentiles crowded Him. How do you account for these extremes [cf. Matthew 4:23; Matthew 7:28-29; and Mark 11:18]?

    6.What do you conclude about Jesus’ identity from His actions in Mark 3:7-12, as well as from the crowd and demonic reactions to Him [cf. Isaiah 61:1-3; Luke 4:40-41; and Luke 7:18-23]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “The Pharisees minded what God spoke, but not what He intended. They were busy in the outward work of the hand, but incurious of the affections and choice of the heart. So God was served in the letter, they did not much inquire into His purpose; and therefore they were curious to wash their hands, but cared not to purify their hearts.” (Jeremy Taylor)

  • Nov 1, 2020The Friend of Sinners – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 1, 2020
    The Friend of Sinners – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Friend of Sinners' based on Mark 2:1-17.
     
    Jesus targets sinners (v. 1-2)
    Jesus forgives sinners (v. 3-12)
    Jesus calls sinners (v. 13-14)
    Jesus befriends sinners (v. 15-16)
    Jesus heals sinners (v. 17)



    ICEBREAKER:
    If someone came up to you and said “Hey, do that thing you do!”, what thing would pop into your head first?

    1.Using your imagination, picture the scene of four friends letting the paralyzed man down through the roof [Mark 2:3-5]. What did Jesus commend that others in the crowd may have condemned [cf. Genesis 32:24-32; Luke 18:1-8; and Acts 14:21-22]?

    2.Why do you think Jesus first forgave the paralyzed man’s sins instead of healing him [Mark 2:5]? What was the greater need – physical or spiritual healing [cf. Psalm 51:1-4; Luke 7:40-50; and John 5:9-15]?

    3.Were the scribes in Mark 2:7 correct that only God can forgive sins? What does this indicate about who our sins directly offend? What identity claim was Jesus making in this text [cf. Psalm 32:5; Psalm 103:8-14; and John 10:22-33]?

    4.How would you answer Jesus’ question, “Which is easier, to say to the paralytic, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Rise, take up your bed and walk’? Why? Consider also John 2:11; John 11:4; and John 20:30-31 in your answer.

    5.Why do you think Jesus included Levi, a tax collector, among His 12 disciples [Mark 2:14]? How do you imagine the other disciples felt when Levi was introduced to them and they had to dine in his home with others of his profession [cf. Matthew 11:19; Matthew 21:31-32; and John 4:31-38]?

    6.Jesus clearly portrayed and conveyed His earthly mission in Mark 2:15-17. What was His mission, and how does it impact our ministry priorities [cf. Luke 15:3-7; Luke 19:10; and 1 Timothy 1:15]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Jesus was a friend of sinners not because He winked at sin, ignored sin, or enjoyed light-hearted revelry with those engaged in immorality. Jesus was a friend of sinners in that He came to save sinners and was very pleased to welcome sinners who were open to the gospel, sorry for their sins, and on their way to putting their faith in Him.” (Kevin DeYoung)

  • Oct 25, 2020Rule Breaker – Brad Lehman
    Oct 25, 2020
    Rule Breaker – Brad Lehman
    This week, Pastor Brad continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Rule Breaker' based on Mark 2:18-28.
     
    1. Feast with Jesus [Mark 2:18-22
    2. Be free in Jesus [Mark 2:23-28]
    3. Jesus is the Rule Breaker because He is the Rule Maker.

    ICEBREAKER: How did you get that scar of yours?

    1.What is the purpose of fasting, and how can it be practiced in a spiritually beneficial way [Mark 2:18]? Consider also 2 Chronicles 20:1-4; Ezra 8:21-23; Matthew 6:16-18; and Acts 13:1-3.

    2.Why is the imagery of a bridegroom so significant in the Scriptures [Mark 2:19-20]? How does it inspire hope for your future? Examine also Isaiah 54:5-6; Isaiah 62:4-5; Matthew 22:1-10; and Revelation 19:6-9.

    3.Why was the bridegroom going to be taken away from His followers [Mark 2:20]? Where was He headed [cf. Matthew 20:28; John 10:17-18; 1 Timothy 2:5-6; and 1 Peter 3:18]?

    4.There was a deliberate contrast between “new” and “old” in Jesus’ two word pictures of patching a garment and pouring wine into wineskins [Mark 2:21-22]. What do you think was Jesus’ point, and what difference does it make [cf. Galatians 4:1-7; Colossians 2:16-23; and Hebrews 10:1-4]?

    5.In Mark 2:25-26, Jesus referred to the story of David eating bread that was set aside for only the priests [1 Samuel 21:1-6]. How does this story demonstrate the intended blessing of the Sabbath [Mark 2:27]? Look at Genesis 2:1-3; Isaiah 58:6-14; and Matthew 12:9-13 for more insights.

    6.What was Jesus claiming when He referred to Himself as “lord even of the Sabbath” [Mark 2:28]? What difference does this make in the life of every disciple [cf. John 1:1-3; Colossians 1:15-17; and Hebrews 1:1-4]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “When Jesus came to earth, demons recognized him, the sick flocked to him, and sinners doused his feet and head with perfume. Meanwhile he offended pious Jews with their strict preconceptions of what God should be like. Their rejection makes me wonder, could religious types be doing just the reverse now? Could we be perpetuating an image of Jesus that fits our pious expectations but does not match the person portrayed so vividly in the Gospels?” (Philip Yancey)

     
  • Oct 11, 2020The Lord & The Leper – Deric Bartlett
    Oct 11, 2020
    The Lord & The Leper – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Lord & The Leper' based on Mark 1:35-45.
     
    1. Prayer is a priority to Jesus: v. 35 
    2. Preaching is the passion of Jesus: v. 36-39 
    3. Restoration is the power of Jesus: v. 40-45
     
    ICEBREAKER: Do you have a regular, daily time of prayer? Is there a particular time or place that you pray? 1. Some general patterns seem to emerge regarding Jesus’ personal habits in verse 35. Also read Mark 6:46 and 14:32. What can we learn from this verse that might be beneficial to our own patterns in life? 2. What can we discover about the leper’s attitude by his posture towards Jesus in verse 40? 3. What was Jesus risking by responding to the man the way He did? What can we learn about Jesus’ nature from this encounter described in verses 40 to 41? 4. This encounter gives us a graphic illustration of Jesus’ mission on earth. Read Galatians 3:13-14 as well, and then in your own words, describe Jesus’ mission. What word would we commonly use to describe the “mission” of Jesus? 5. Jesus’ response and charge to the man in verses 43 and 44 was somewhat surprising. What was His response and why might Jesus have instructed him in this way? Why would Jesus instruct him to show himself to the priest? (Read Deuteronomy 24:8; Leviticus 14:2-4) 6. By disobeying Jesus’ instructions to “say nothing to anyone”, how did the man complicate Jesus’ plans? How do you identify with the man’s reaction and response? In what ways do we do the very same thing today? 7. What did you find particularly helpful or challenging about the message this week?
    “Life must be seen and lived in the light of God’s Word.” J.I. Packer