Aug 18, 2019
Delivered From All My Fears – Deric Bartlett
Series: Restored
This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Delivered From All My Fears focusing on Psalms 34:1-10
 
Questions
Psalms 34:1-10
ICEBREAKER: Do you have any phobias?
1. The most often repeated command in the Bible is, “Do not fear!” [Examples: Exodus 20:20; Joshua 8:1; Luke 1:30; Revelation 2:10]. To overcome your fears, you must be able to identify them and admit them. What are your most debilitating fears? How are they hindering your walk with the Lord as well as your relationships with others?
2. Examine Numbers 13:17-14:10. How did the Israelites’ fear of the people of Canaan affect their choices and actions [Numbers 14:9-10]? Notice the correlation of fear and rebellion against God’s clearly revealed will. What conclusions do you draw from this story?
3. In Isaiah 7, King Ahaz and his people feared invading armies [Isaiah 7:1-2]. The prophet Isaiah challenged him to trust in the Lord’s deliverance [7:3-9], and even offered a sign to confirm the prophecy [7:10-11]. Ahaz refused the sign under the pretense of piety, but he was covering up his unbelief. God gave him the sign anyway – the birth of a child named Immanuel (“God with us”) [7:13-14]. How does the promise of God’s presence address your fears? What is the best strategy to face your fears based on this text?
4. Psalm 139:23-24 is King David’s sincere prayer for God’s examination of his heart and innermost thoughts. He requested God’s light to expose his darkness. Note the relationship between his anxious thoughts and grievous ways. What does this show you about the detrimental effects of your fears? How does this insight help you combat your fears?
5. Near the end of Jesus’ time with His disciples, He told them he was going to leave them [John 13:36; 14:28]. Obviously, they found this news distressing [14:1]. To counter their anxieties, Jesus offered them His peace [14:27]. What is distinctive about His peace, and Who brings it to us [14:26]?
6. Philippians 4:4-7 provides God’s strategy for dealing with believers’ fearful anxieties. Meditate on these verses and come up with a list of definite steps you can take to experience His promised peace.
7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
 
“Faith, which is trust, and fear are opposite poles. If a man has the one, he can scarcely have the other in vigorous operation. He that has his trust set upon God does not need to dread anything except the weakening or the paralyzing of that trust.” (Alexander MacLaren)
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  • Aug 18, 2019Delivered From All My Fears – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 18, 2019
    Delivered From All My Fears – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Delivered From All My Fears focusing on Psalms 34:1-10
     
    Questions
    Psalms 34:1-10
    ICEBREAKER: Do you have any phobias?
    1. The most often repeated command in the Bible is, “Do not fear!” [Examples: Exodus 20:20; Joshua 8:1; Luke 1:30; Revelation 2:10]. To overcome your fears, you must be able to identify them and admit them. What are your most debilitating fears? How are they hindering your walk with the Lord as well as your relationships with others?
    2. Examine Numbers 13:17-14:10. How did the Israelites’ fear of the people of Canaan affect their choices and actions [Numbers 14:9-10]? Notice the correlation of fear and rebellion against God’s clearly revealed will. What conclusions do you draw from this story?
    3. In Isaiah 7, King Ahaz and his people feared invading armies [Isaiah 7:1-2]. The prophet Isaiah challenged him to trust in the Lord’s deliverance [7:3-9], and even offered a sign to confirm the prophecy [7:10-11]. Ahaz refused the sign under the pretense of piety, but he was covering up his unbelief. God gave him the sign anyway – the birth of a child named Immanuel (“God with us”) [7:13-14]. How does the promise of God’s presence address your fears? What is the best strategy to face your fears based on this text?
    4. Psalm 139:23-24 is King David’s sincere prayer for God’s examination of his heart and innermost thoughts. He requested God’s light to expose his darkness. Note the relationship between his anxious thoughts and grievous ways. What does this show you about the detrimental effects of your fears? How does this insight help you combat your fears?
    5. Near the end of Jesus’ time with His disciples, He told them he was going to leave them [John 13:36; 14:28]. Obviously, they found this news distressing [14:1]. To counter their anxieties, Jesus offered them His peace [14:27]. What is distinctive about His peace, and Who brings it to us [14:26]?
    6. Philippians 4:4-7 provides God’s strategy for dealing with believers’ fearful anxieties. Meditate on these verses and come up with a list of definite steps you can take to experience His promised peace.
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Faith, which is trust, and fear are opposite poles. If a man has the one, he can scarcely have the other in vigorous operation. He that has his trust set upon God does not need to dread anything except the weakening or the paralyzing of that trust.” (Alexander MacLaren)
  • Aug 11, 2019Healing for the Heart – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 11, 2019
    Healing for the Heart – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Healing for the Heart focusing on Proverbs 14:30.
     
    Questions
    Proverbs 14:30
    ICEBREAKER: Have you ever had a physical wound that took you a period of time to recover from? What was it, and what was the recovery process like?
    1. For Christians, the center-point of our faith is what Jesus accomplished on the cross. What initially comes to your mind when you think of the cross, and why Jesus died for us?
    2. Think about a diamond. It has many sides, called facets, and these all make up the shape of the stone. Keep this illustration in mind as you reflect on the cross. What different pictures—or facets—do we see from Scripture about the cross, and about what Jesus accomplished there? Look up the following passages, note down observations, then discuss your findings together (see Colossians 2:13-15; Acts 2:23; Mark 2:17; 10:45; John 1:29; Romans 3:23-25; Galatians 3:13-14; Ephesians 2:11-16; 5:25-27; Titus 3:3-7; Hebrews 2:14-18; 1 Peter 2:24-25; Isaiah 53:5).
    3. When we have grasped the message of the cross and how we can have forgiveness through Jesus and security for the afterlife, we can often stop there. But Scripture’s multi-faceted picture of the cross tells us there is so much more to why Jesus died for us. Forgiveness is offered to us because God wants us to have a restored relationship with Him. In that way, it is the foundation of our relationship, but only the beginning of the relationship God wants with us. Reflect on what the Scripture says about God’s intention for us to be reconciled with Him (see John 14:27; 15:9-11; Psalm 16:11; Romans 5:3-5; Revelation 19:6-9).
    4. The wounds and hurts we carry with us in life often prevent us from experiencing the joy and peace in our hearts that God wants us to enjoy in relationship with Him. How could unhealed wounds affect people, or you personally? And why do you think it is important that we find healing for our past wounds?
    5. In his Soul Care book, Rob Reimer says: “Sadly, sometimes these hurts [from our past] are protected behind a fortress of defense mechanisms that keep us from accessing them. The fortress is not a healing refuge. The walls must come down, and we must let Jesus into our painful places, for He alone is the Healer” (p.150). What “defense mechanisms” have you seen in people (or in yourself personally) that keep us from processing our hurts with God?
    6. What can each of us do to curb our habits of avoiding facing our pain, and carve out more space and time to process them with the Lord?
    7. What did you find challenging or helpful about this Sunday’s message?
     
     
  • Aug 4, 2019Your Ancestry Sin – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 4, 2019
    Your Ancestry Sin – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Your Ancestry Sin focusing on Ephesians 5:31-32.
     
    Questions
    Ephesians 5:31-32
    ICEBREAKER: Have you ever accomplished something in your life that others (or even you!) thought you would never be able to do? What was it? How were you able to succeed when the odds were against you? How did you feel when it was over?
    1. Abraham’s story has about as good a beginning as one could imagine! Blessings and a covenant promise from God Himself! In time, things begin to deteriorate, and sin patterns emerge. Read these short chapters, Genesis 12-17. Can you identify the sin patterns and possible causes for these patterns to gain a strong foothold in this family?
    2. David is as well known for his personal failures as he is for his successes. Read 2 Samuel 12:1-23. How is it that David is able to change his sin patterns? Read 1 Chronicles 21:1-27. After disobeying God again, how does David react to his sin? How does God respond and what is the result?
    3. Jacob’s love for his son Joseph actually ends up hurting Joseph. How far back can you trace this pattern of favouritism in Joseph’s family? (ex. read Genesis 25:19 – 37:36)
    4. Joseph is remembered as a success and as a victim. How is Joseph able to rise up and avoid a ‘victim mentality’ even though he was clearly hurt by others? (read Genesis 39-41)
    5. Looking back at your family history, what sin patterns can you identify? How have you seen these patterns influence your family? What have you learned from Scripture that you can now apply to your own situation and family life ?
    6. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “When kingdom culture clashes with my American culture or my family-of- origin culture, I must choose Kingdom culture.” – Dr. Rob Reimer
  • Jul 28, 2019The Trouble with Forgiveness – Max Oates
    Jul 28, 2019
    The Trouble with Forgiveness – Max Oates
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Max continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled The Trouble with Forgiveness focusing on Micah 7:18-20.
     
    Questions
    Micah 7:18-20
    ICEBREAKER: Has anyone ever shown you mercy? What happened, and how did it make you feel?
    1. The minor prophet, Micah, lamented the many social ills of his day in Micah 7:1-6. Do you notice any parallels to today? Yet, he shared his hope in God’s restoration in Micah 7:7-17. Are you maintaining your hope in this chaotic world? How?
    2. Micah 7:18 begins with a question that expects the answer: “No one!” How do we know that God is unlike every other so-called “god”? What sets Him apart, according to this text as well as Numbers 14:18, 1 Kings 14:18, and Isaiah 55:7?
    3. Micah celebrates the forgiveness of the Lord in Micah 7:18 by writing that our God “pardons iniquity” and “passes over transgression”. What does this indicate about the reality of our offences, and the greatness of God’s grace?
    4. How do you reconcile the anger of God and the love of God [Micah 7:18]? Consider Exodus 34:6-7, Jeremiah 3:12-14, and Nehemiah 9:16-17 in your response.
    5. Mercy is the withholding of punishment or judgment that one deserves [Micah 7:19]. How has God shown you mercy? How can you show mercy to others [cf. Matthew 5:7, Matthew 9:9-13, and Matthew 18:23-35]?
    6. What are appropriate responses to God’s willingness to forgive us our sins [cf. Psalm 103:8-14, Matthew 18:21-22, Mark 11:25, Luke 7:44-47, and Ephesians 4:32]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Forgiveness is the economy of the heart. Forgiveness saves the expense of anger, the cost of hatred, the waste of spirits.” (Hannah More)
  • Jul 21, 2019Confessing Christians – Deric Bartlett
    Jul 21, 2019
    Confessing Christians – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Confessing Christians focusing on 1 John 1 :1- 10.
     
    Questions
    Galatians 1 John 1: 1 - 10
    ICEBREAKER: Did you ever run away from home?
    1. How important is it to you that the gospel writers, including the apostle John, were actual eye-witnesses of Jesus’ earthly life [1 John 1:1-2]? What difference does this make in your faith [cf. Luke 24:45-48; Acts 10:34-43; 2 Peter 1:16]?
    2. In today’s world, everyone thinks morality is determined by what they feel is right or wrong for them. How does the Word of God counter this dangerous falsehood with the necessity of repentance [cf. Matthew 3:7-12; Luke 5:31-32; 2 Timothy 2:24- 26]?
    3. How does the assertion that “God is light, and in him is no darkness at all” [1 John 1:5] affect your understanding of God’s character and mission? Consider other texts such as John 3:19-21, John 8:12, and John 9:5 in your response.
    4. In the book, Soul Care, the author writes, “A soul in alignment is a soul without secrets. We cannot walk free if we will not repent from sin and bring it into the light with God and others” [p. 78]. What are the negative consequences of remaining in the dark [1 John 1:6]? What are the positives of walking in God’s light [1 John 1:7]?
    5. The doomed attempt to appear perfect or faultless is an unhealthy, debilitating burden to bear. According to 1 John 1: 8 and 10, what results from such false appearances? What does this reveal about the power of unchecked, unconfessed sin [cf. Genesis 4:6-7; Isaiah 53:6; James 3:2]?
    6. What are the liberating effects of humbly and authentically taking full ownership for our part in our sin [1 John 1:9]? Reflect on Psalm 32, Psalm 139:23-24, Acts 13:37-39, and Acts 28:18 for further insights.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Few things accelerate the peace process as much as humbly admitting our own wrongdoing and asking forgiveness.” (Lee Strobel)
  • Jul 14, 2019Let’s Talk About You – Deric Bartlett
    Jul 14, 2019
    Let’s Talk About You – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Let's Talk About You! focusing on Galatians 2:20
     
    Questions
    Galatians 2:20
    ICEBREAKER: Are you known more as a person who follows all the “rules” or someone who paints outside the lines? How has this been a help or a hindrance to you in the past?
    1. Consider the context of today’s text: Galatians 2:15-19. Compare with Matthew 5:17-19, Philippians 3:9 and Romans 8:1-8. What do you learn about the Law from these passages? How does the Law relate to the life of a Christian today? What other passages of Scripture would you use to support your ideas?
    2. Examine Colossians 2:20, 3:3, 2 Timothy 2:11 and Romans 6:3-14 with today’s text. What does it mean to be “crucified with Christ”?
    3. Read Romans 1:1, James 1:1, 2 Peter 1:1 and Jude 1:1. What do these verses suggest to you about the way the disciples viewed their identity?
    4. Reflect on Galatians 2:20 from the perspective of 1 Corinthians 11:1 and 1 Peter 2:21. How do these passages impact the way you respond to events in your day-to-day life?
    5. How is the person others perceive you to be different than the person you really are? What other passages of Scripture do you turn to when you experience doubt or confusion about your own identity?
    6. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Jesus came to announce to us that an identity based on success, popularity and power is a false identity- an illusion! Loudly and clearly he says: ‘You are not what the world makes you; but you are children of God.” ― Henri J.M. Nouwen, Here and Now: Living in the Spirit
  • Jul 7, 2019Restored – Deric Bartlett
    Jul 7, 2019
    Restored – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric begins the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Restored focusing on Psalm 23.
     
    Questions
    Psalm 23
    ICEBREAKER: If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be? Why?
    1. According to Psalm 23:1-4, along with 1 Samuel 17:34-35, Psalm 28:9, Isaiah 40:11, and John 10:1-16, what are the roles and functions of an effective shepherd?
    2. Psalm 23 is full of first-person personal pronouns (“me”, “I”), indicating it has an intensely personal message. Insert your personal name whenever one of these personal pronouns appears and read it out loud. How does this make you feel as you reflect on God’s personal interest and care for you?
    3. Our culture seems bent on living the fast-paced, frenzied, and frazzled lifestyle. Psalm 23:1-3 counters with a message of rest, restoration and refreshment. How are you choosing each day to resist the rush of the world and to rest in your relationship with the Lord? Consider Jeremiah 6:16, Matthew 11:28-30, and Luke 10:38-42 for further insights.
    4. Why do our souls require restoring by our Great Shepherd [Psalm 23:3]? Consult Jeremiah 17:9-10, Matthew 15:18-20, Romans 3:23-24, and Galatians 5:16-24 for deeper understanding.
    5. Life inevitably leads through valleys of deep darkness where danger, despair and doubt lurk [Psalm 23:4]. How does the promise of God’s presence comfort and encourage you from this text, as well as Exodus 33:12-17, Deuteronomy 31:6, Isaiah 43:1-3, Psalm 46:1-3, and Psalm 121?
    6. Psalm 23:1-4 depicts a shepherd with a sheep. In Psalm 23:5-6, the picture shifts to a royal banquet. How does the portrayal that you are an invited and honoured guest of God inspire you to live in close relationship with Him? Examine Psalm 27:4-6, 2 Corinthians 5:1-10, and Revelation 19:5-9 for deeper appreciation.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Jesus Christ became Incarnate for one purpose, to make a way back to God that man might stand before Him as He was created to do, the friend and lover of God Himself.” (Oswald Chambers)