Jan 3, 2021
Spiritual Vaccination – Deric Bartlett
Series: One off
This week, Pastor Deric start the new year with a message title 'Spiritual Vaccination' base don Jeremiah 9:23-24.
 

 

  1. Knowing God as the LORD is the experience that summarizes the entire Bible
  2. Knowing God as the LORD will protect you from judgment
  3. Knowing God as the LORD will protect you from boasting
  4. Knowing God as the LORD will protect you from ignorance


ICEBREAKER:
What realistic New Year’s resolutions are you planning to make?

1. Jeremiah is known as “the weeping prophet”. Jeremiah 9:1-2 provides a great example of this tendency. What prompted his tears, and how does it help in the development of a compassionate heart for people [cf. Matthew 5:4; Luke 19:41-44; and Romans 9:1-5]?

2. Notice the word pictures used to describe the spiritual adultery of the people [Jeremiah 9:3-8]. Has the human condition changed over time? What examples from today reveal the human race’s continued spiritual unfaithfulness [cf. Genesis 6:5-7; Mark 7:20-23; Romans 1:28-32; and 2 Timothy 3:1-5]?

3. God’s patience toward sinners eventually ends. What do you learn about God’s character that prompts you to restrain unrighteousness [cf. Romans 2:1-11; Romans 9:19-26; and 2 Peter 3:8-10]?

4. Jeremiah 9:12-22 lists God’s indictment of His unfaithful people along with the impending doom of destruction and exile. Why do you think people persist in sin when it inevitably leads to disaster [cf. Genesis 4:6-7; Numbers 32:23; and Romans 6:15-19]?

5. After outlining the imminent destruction and death [Jeremiah 9:15-22], the LORD exposed the false boasts of the people of Judah [Jeremiah 9:23]. What were these 3 false hopes, and what are modern parallels [cf. Deuteronomy 8:11-20; Isaiah 5:18-23; and Zephaniah 1:14-18]?

6.  According to Jeremiah 9:24, in what does the LORD delight? If someone truly knows the LORD and His character, what practices will he/she exhibit? Consider Exodus 34:6-7; Jeremiah 31:33-34; and Micah 6:6-8 for further insights.

7.   What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

“There’s a difference between knowing God and knowing about God. When you truly know God, you have energy to serve Him, boldness to share Him, and contentment in Him.” (J.I. Packer)

WatchNotesDownloadDateTitle
  • Jan 3, 2021Spiritual Vaccination – Deric Bartlett
    Jan 3, 2021
    Spiritual Vaccination – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Deric start the new year with a message title 'Spiritual Vaccination' base don Jeremiah 9:23-24.
     

     

    1. Knowing God as the LORD is the experience that summarizes the entire Bible
    2. Knowing God as the LORD will protect you from judgment
    3. Knowing God as the LORD will protect you from boasting
    4. Knowing God as the LORD will protect you from ignorance


    ICEBREAKER:
    What realistic New Year’s resolutions are you planning to make?

    1. Jeremiah is known as “the weeping prophet”. Jeremiah 9:1-2 provides a great example of this tendency. What prompted his tears, and how does it help in the development of a compassionate heart for people [cf. Matthew 5:4; Luke 19:41-44; and Romans 9:1-5]?

    2. Notice the word pictures used to describe the spiritual adultery of the people [Jeremiah 9:3-8]. Has the human condition changed over time? What examples from today reveal the human race’s continued spiritual unfaithfulness [cf. Genesis 6:5-7; Mark 7:20-23; Romans 1:28-32; and 2 Timothy 3:1-5]?

    3. God’s patience toward sinners eventually ends. What do you learn about God’s character that prompts you to restrain unrighteousness [cf. Romans 2:1-11; Romans 9:19-26; and 2 Peter 3:8-10]?

    4. Jeremiah 9:12-22 lists God’s indictment of His unfaithful people along with the impending doom of destruction and exile. Why do you think people persist in sin when it inevitably leads to disaster [cf. Genesis 4:6-7; Numbers 32:23; and Romans 6:15-19]?

    5. After outlining the imminent destruction and death [Jeremiah 9:15-22], the LORD exposed the false boasts of the people of Judah [Jeremiah 9:23]. What were these 3 false hopes, and what are modern parallels [cf. Deuteronomy 8:11-20; Isaiah 5:18-23; and Zephaniah 1:14-18]?

    6.  According to Jeremiah 9:24, in what does the LORD delight? If someone truly knows the LORD and His character, what practices will he/she exhibit? Consider Exodus 34:6-7; Jeremiah 31:33-34; and Micah 6:6-8 for further insights.

    7.   What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “There’s a difference between knowing God and knowing about God. When you truly know God, you have energy to serve Him, boldness to share Him, and contentment in Him.” (J.I. Packer)

  • Oct 18, 2020The Shining City – Deric Bartlett
    Oct 18, 2020
    The Shining City – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Deric shares a special message for our 40th anniversary titled 'The Shining City' based on Matthew 5:13-16.
    We are the salt of the earth We are the light of the world We are a city set on a hill
     
    1.Why do you think Jesus employed the metaphor of salt to describe the impact of His disciples on others [Matthew 5:13]? What is it about salt that makes it influential [cf. Job 6:6; 2 Kings 2:19-22; and Colossians 4:5-6]?
     
    2.Jesus listed the qualities of His disciples in His Beatitudes in Matthew 5:3-12. How do these shed light on how a disciple may lose saltiness [Matthew 5:13]? Consider also Ephesians 4:17-24; Hebrews 6:1-6; and 2 Peter 2:17-22.
     
    3.What is it about the properties of light that make it a fitting metaphor for Jesus’ followers [cf. Matthew 5:14]? Examine also John 8:12; Ephesians 5:7-10; and Philippians 2:14-16.
     
    4.Why would a city set atop a hill be an apt description of a follower of Jesus [Matthew 5:14]? Look up Psalm 48; Zechariah 8:1-8; and Hebrews 11:13-16 as well.
     
    5.According to Jesus, what is the role of “good works” [Matthew 5:16]? Are they necessary for salvation, or necessary as a result of salvation [cf. Ephesians 2:10; Titus 3:4-8, 14; and 1 Peter 2:11-12]?
     
    6.What does it mean to “give glory to your Father in heaven” [Matthew 5:16]? How do we ensure God receives glory [cf. Daniel 4:34-37; Matthew 9:1-8; and Revelation 4:9-11]?
     
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
     
    “Missions is not the ultimate goal of the church. Worship is. Missions exists because worship doesn’t.” (John Piper)
  • Mar 15, 2020Do Not Be Anxious – Deric Bartlett
    Mar 15, 2020
    Do Not Be Anxious – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Deric shares a message called 'Do not be Anxious' based on Psalm 28:& and Philippians 4:6.
    The video link the entire service which was live-streamed as we monitor the Coronavirus situation. This audio is the sermon only.

    CHILDREN’S MINISTRIES

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  • Mar 8, 2020Cornering A Con – Brad Lehman
    Mar 8, 2020
    Cornering A Con – Brad Lehman
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Brad shares a message called 'Cornering A con', based on the book of Philemon.
     
    1. The witnesses of a con: Find faithful accomplices [Philemon 1:1-3].
    2. The victim of a con: Respond to victimization by refreshing others [Philemon 1:4-7].
    3. The cornering of a con: Let God corner the useless to convert them to useful [Philemon 1:8-16].
    4. Climbing into a con’s corner: Identify with the guilty [Philemon 1:17-22].
    5. Greetings from more accomplices: Praise God for His grace [Philemon 1:23-25]. Let Jesus climb into your corner.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What do you wish someone taught you a long time ago?
     
    1. What prayer principles do you pick up from Paul’s prayer in Philemon 1:4-7? Compare with other Scriptures such as 1 Corinthians 1:4-9; Ephesians 1:15-19; and 1 Thessalonians 1:2-5.
     
    2. How does a believer refresh “the hearts of the saints” [Philemon 1:7, 20]? What would that look like? Consult also Matthew 11:28-30; 1 Corinthians 16:15-18; and 2 Corinthians 7:13-16 for further insights.
     
    3. Paul wrote that he had become the “father” of Onesimus during his imprisonment [Philemon 1:10]. What does this show about their spiritual relationship? What impact does the analogy of a “father” have for those who serve in Christ’s church [cf. Acts 20:25-35; 1 Corinthians 4:14-21; and 1 Thessalonians 2:9-12]?
     
    4. Have you ever felt or been called “useless” [Philemon 1:11]? Who or what prompted this reaction? How does the good news of Christ restore one to “usefulness” [cf. Luke 19:1-10; 1 Timothy 1:12-16; and 2 Timothy 2:20-21]?
     
    5. The world focuses on status symbols, titles, power, fame and wealth. In contrast, Christ’s gospel elevates all who trust Him to His beloved family members [Philemon 1:15-17]. How does this changed perspective influence how you treat each member of your church family [cf. Ephesians 6:5-9; Colossians 3:22-24; and 1 Timothy 6:1-2]?
     
    6. How does Paul’s language in Philemon 1:17-19 echo that of the gospel? How does Paul’s advocacy on Onesimus’ behalf imitate Christ for us? How can we do this for others? Consider Luke 15:1-7; Acts 9:26-30; and Romans 15:7 for more ideas.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Wherever Jesus has been proclaimed, we see lives change for the good, nations change for the better, thieves become honest, alcoholics become sober, hateful individuals become channels of love, unjust persons embrace justice.” (Josh McDowell)
  • Mar 1, 2020What’s Suffering Good For? – Darryl Dash
    Mar 1, 2020
    What’s Suffering Good For? – Darryl Dash
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Darryl Dash from Liberty Grace Church shares with us. 'What's Suffering Good For?' is based on 2 Corinthians 1:1-11.
     
    God is a compassionate, encouraging God.
    The suffering we face is purposeful.
    Suffering builds community.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What has really taken a toll on you?
     
    1. Paul discussed affliction and suffering in 2 Corinthians 1:1-11. Yet he began by blessing God [11:3]. What role does worship play in helping us navigate life’s trials [cf. Luke 1:68-75; Ephesians 1:3-6; and 1 Peter 1:3-9]?
     
    2. What does it mean that God is the God of all comfort [2 Corinthians 1:3-4]? How does this encourage you? Consult also Isaiah 40:1-2; Isaiah 60:1-3; 2 Thessalonians 2:16-17.
     
    3. How does our suffering prepare us to help others [2 Corinthians 1:4-6]? Consider also Philippians 3:10-11; Colossians 1:24; and 1 Peter 4:12-14.
     
    4. How does our suffering help to deepen community [2 Corinthians 1:7-11]? Look up Acts 9:15-16; Romans 8:16-17; and 1 Peter 5:8-10 for further insights.
     
    5. Paul was honest about his suffering [2 Corinthians 1:8-9]. Why do we sometimes believe that followers of Jesus shouldn’t suffer or despair [cf. Isaiah 53:3-6; Romans 5:3-5; and 2 Timothy 3:10-12]?
     
    6. What is the place of prayer in suffering [2 Corinthians 1:11]? How have you experienced comfort through the prayers of others? Examine Acts 12:3-17; Philippians 1:19, and Ephesians 6:18-20 for more encouragement.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “I am not a theologian or a scholar, but I am very aware of the fact that pain is necessary to all of us. In my own life, I think I can honestly say that out of the deepest pain has come the strongest conviction of the presence of God and the love of God.” (Elisabeth Elliot)
  • Jan 19, 2020Breaking The Surface – Brad Lehman
    Jan 19, 2020
    Breaking The Surface – Brad Lehman
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Brad shares some tips on how to improve your prayer life titled 'Breaking the Surface' based on Acts 4:23-31.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What was your favourite vehicle that you’ve owned?
     
    1. The context for Acts 4:23-31 began in Acts 3:1. What was the backstory that instigated this prayer? What was noticeably different about the early Christians, and what caused the change [cf. Mark 5:18-19; Luke 19:7-10; John 4:28-29]?
     
    2. How did these early believers begin their prayer in Acts 4:24? Why is worshiping God – rehearsing Who He is and what He has done – such a priority in prayer? Consult also 2 Kings 19:14-19; Nehemiah 9:5b-15; and Isaiah 6:1-7.
     
    3. What do you learn about the value of the Bible as an aid to prayer from Acts 4:25-26? What are the benefits of praying Scripture [cf. Psalm 19:7-11; Matthew 6:9-13; 2 Timothy 3:14-17]?
     
    4. The prayer of these early Christians acknowledged the evil perpetrated by Jesus’ enemies [Acts 4:27]. Yet, they were confident God sovereignly superintended everything for His purposes [Acts 4:28]. How does their confidence in the Lord inspire you in your life challenges [cf. Acts 2:23-24; Romans 8:28; Ephesians 1:11-12]?
     
    5. These early Christians did not pray for deliverance from persecution but boldness in persecution [Acts 4:29]. What does this tell you about the purpose and power of prayer [cf. Acts 4:13; Philippians 1:12-14; 1Thessalonians 2:1-2]?
     
    6. Notice the order of the events in Acts 4:31 – prayer, God’s presence, empowerment, and mission. What do we learn about ministry and mission from this order [Acts 9:17-22; Acts 11:23-26; Ephesians 5:17-20]?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The right way to pray is to stretch out our hands and ask of One who we know has the heart of a Father.” (Dietrich Bonhoeffer)
  • Jan 5, 202020/20 Vision – Deric Bartlett
    Jan 5, 2020
    20/20 Vision – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Deric sets our vision for the year 2020 with a message titled "20/20 Vision"

    Questions:

    ICEBREAKER: What are you planning to practice this year to make it your best year ever spiritually?

    1. The Great Commission of Matthew 28:18-20 is key to understanding City Centre’s reason for existing. Who [Matthew 3:16-17] is commissioning who [Matthew 10:2]? What is the mission [Acts 1:8]? How is it to be done [Matthew 13:36-43]? What is the promise [Matthew 1:21-23] and hope [Revelation 22:1-5]?

    2. Christianity is designed to be a relationship with God, not just a religion. Spending time with God fosters that relationship. What are your daily practices that prioritize alone time with God? Consider Psalm 5:3; Psalm 42:1-2; Luke 5:16; and Acts 17:11 in your thoughts.

    3. What is the purpose of weekly corporate worship, and why is it so important? Include Psalm 95:1-7; Acts 13:1-2; and Revelation 5:6-14 in your response.

    4. Following Christ is more than a solitary pursuit. We are created for community. What are the benefits of walking with Jesus alongside others [cf. Acts 2:42-47; Colossians 3:12-17; and Hebrews 10:24-25]?

    5. Christians are saved to serve, for that was the example of our Lord [cf. Mark 10:45; Luke 22:27]. How does serving others benefit us as well as the entire body of Christ [cf. Galatians 5:13-14; Ephesians 4:11-16; and 1 Peter 4:10]?

    6. Throughout church history, the Great Commission has too often collapsed into the Great Omission. Why is mission so dear to our Heavenly Father’s heart, and what are we able to do to accomplish it together? Reflect on Romans 16:25-27; Galatians 4:4-5; and 1 John 4:9-10 for further insights.

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “All God’s giants have been weak men who did great things for God because they reckoned on God being with them.” (Hudson Taylor

  • Dec 1, 2019Jesus, the Perfect High Priest – Deric Bartlett
    Dec 1, 2019
    Jesus, the Perfect High Priest – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Jesus, the Perfect High Priest focusing on Hebrews 5:1-10.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 5:1-10
     

    Ice Breaker: Are you more productive at night or in the morning? Do you think it’s possible to change and get used to another schedule?

    1. According to Hebrews 5:1, what qualifies a person to serve as an Old Testament high priest? How does this help us understand Christ’s high priestly role, and how does it encourage you? Check also Romans 8:1-4; 2 Corinthians 5:21; and 1 Peter 2:24-25.

    2. Hebrews 5:2-4 speak of an effective high priest’s empathy for the people he represents before God. How does Jesus measure up, and surpass, such lofty standards? Also look at Matthew 9:35-38; Luke 7:11-17; and John 11:32-35.

    3. Although the texts quoted in Hebrews 5:5-6 speak of the exalted position of God’s Anointed King [Psalm 2:7; Psalm 110:4], Jesus lived on earth as a humble servant [cf. Matthew 21:5; Luke 2:4-7; Philippians 2:3-11]. How does this portrayal of Jesus amaze and inspire you?

    4. How does Jesus’ model of a prayer life instruct and inspire your prayer life [Hebrews 5:7]? Consult also Luke 5:16; Luke 11:1-4; and Luke 22:39-46.

    5. How do you understand Hebrews 5:8? What is the relationship between a child of God and the purpose of suffering [cf. Matthew 5:10-12; Romans 5:3-5; Philippians 4:10-13; and James 1:2-4]?

    6. What is the role of obedience in Christ’s experience as well as the believer’s experience [Hebrews 5:8-9]? How does His obedience motivate your obedience [cf. Romans 1:5; Romans 2:6-8; and Romans 6:15-19]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

  • Nov 24, 2019Great Expectations – Max Oates
    Nov 24, 2019
    Great Expectations – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    1. Two times David writes he “waits in silence for God” in this psalm [Psalm 62:1 & 5]. What does that look like? Does it mean do nothing, or is there some activity we must engage in? Consult also Psalm 27:14; Psalm 130:5-6; and Isaiah 40:28-31.
     
    2. Why does David use the images of a rock, a refuge, and a fortress [Psalm 62:2, 6-8]? Why were these images so meaningful to him [cf. 1 Samuel 23:24-29; 1 Samuel 30:6; 2 Samuel 5:17]? How do these images help you through life’s difficulties?
     
    3. David’s experience seems to mirror today. The current climate of our culture is characterized by mean-spiritedness. Everyone seems angry and personally offended by opposing viewpoints, resulting in yelling past one another, especially in social media. Have you ever experienced Psalm 62:3-4? Is there a better way to respond [ cf. Galatians 5:15; Ephesians 4:25-32; and James 1:19-21]?
     
    4. Faith, love and hope are expressed in other words in Psalm 62:8. Why are these 3 expressions so central to believers’ lives, and how do they strengthen us in the middle of hardships? Also examine Romans 5:1-5; 1 Thessalonians 1:3 and 5:8 for more insights.
    5. Psalm 62:9 addresses our human tendency toward self-importance. In our “selfie” and “viral” age, God’s Word reminds us we are but a “breath”. How does this word picture influence your self-awareness and priorities [cf. Genesis 1:26-27; Psalm 8:3-8; Psalm 144:3-4; James 4:13-14; and 1 John 3:1-3]?
    6. The Bible warns us to not set our hears on temporary material things, especially if they are unjustly gained [Psalm 62:10]. How can we keep material possessions from possessing us? Reflect also on Ecclesiastes 5:10-20; Matthew 6:19-24; and  Hebrews 13:5.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
  • Nov 10, 2019Face to Face with Jesus – Phil Webb
    Nov 10, 2019
    Face to Face with Jesus – Phil Webb
    Series: One off
    This week Phil Webb preached a sermon titled Face to Face With Jesus focusing on Luke 18:18 - 29
     
    Questions
    Luke 18: 18 - 29
    ICEBREAKER: What takes a lot of time but is totally worth it?

    1. The story of the ruler’s question [Luke 18:18-30] follows immediately after Jesus welcomed little children [Luke 18:15-17]. What do you think of the ruler’s question [v. 18] in light of the preceding verse [v. 17], along with John 6:28-29; Acts 16:30-31, and Ephesians 2:8-10? Do you think his question was sincere? Why or why not?
    2. Why do you think Jesus introduced the 10 Commandments to assess the ruler’s spiritual condition [Luke 18:20-22]? How might you use them to share the gospel with unbelievers [cf. Romans 7:7-12; Romans 13:8-10; and Galatians 3:10-14]?
    3. What was the one thing the ruler lacked [Luke 18:22-23]? What do you think was going on in the ruler’s heart? What needed to happen for him to inherit eternal life [cf. John 3:15-17; 1 Timothy 1:15-16; and 1 John 5:10-13]?
    4. Is Jesus commanding all wealthy people to sell everything and distribute the proceeds to the poor in order to follow Him [Luke 18:22]? How should believers view wealth based on this text, as well as Ecclesiastes 5:10-20; Matthew 6:19-24; and 1 Timothy 6:5-10?
    5. How should wealthy believers relate to the poor based on Luke 18:22, as well as Proverbs 14:21 & 31; Luke 12:13-21; Acts 4:32-37; 1 Timothy 6:17-19; and James 2:1-13?
    6. A common misconception is that riches indicate favour while poverty indicates disfavour. Jesus appeared to discourage this wealthy ruler, much to the shock of those with Him [Luke 18:24-26]. According to Jesus, “then who can be saved” to experience God’s favour [Luke 18:27- 30]? Consult also Luke 18:9-14; Luke 19:1-10; and Acts 9:1-6, 17-22.
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “If we discover a desire within us that nothing in this world can satisfy, also we should begin to wonder if perhaps we were created for another world.” (C.S. Lewis)
  • Oct 27, 2019The Beautiful Strokes of God – Allan Gallant
    Oct 27, 2019
    The Beautiful Strokes of God – Allan Gallant
    Series: One off
    This week Allan Gallant preached a sermon titled The Beautiful Strokes of God focusing on Romans 8:28-29.
     
    Questions
    Romans 8:28 - 29
    ICEBREAKER: What is the most clever or funniest use of advertising you’ve seen?

    1. Romans 8:28 assures believers that “all things work together for good”. What does this tell you about the character and power of God? How does this assurance help you when times are tough [cf. Romans 5:3-5; 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; and James 1:2-4].
    2. What does it mean “to be conformed to the image of His Son” [Romans 8:29]? If this is God’s purpose for every believer’s life, how does this goal impact how we live [cf. 2 Corinthians 3:16-18; Ephesians 1:5; Ephesians 4:22-24]?
    3. Romans 8:31 tells us that no one can be against believers when God is for them. What is the greatest proof that God is for us, according to Romans 8:32? What promise can we hold on to in Romans 8:32 to help us through trying times [cf. Romans 4:24-25; Romans 5:6-8; Ephesians 5:1-2]?
    4. Romans 8:33-34 uses the word picture of a law court. In this context, who serves as the judge, the prosecuting attorney, the defence attorney, and the accused? How is the accused acquitted of all charges in this spiritual courtroom? Are you able to identify [cf. Isaiah 54:17; Zechariah 3:1-5; John 5:24; Romans 8:1]?
    5. How does Christ’s love for you enable you to be more than a conqueror despite the many and various difficulties of life [Romans 8:35-37]? Consult also Matthew 5:10; John 16:33; and 2 Corinthians 12:10.
    6. Are you completely convinced of God’s great love for you? Spend some quiet moments reflecting on each of the threats listed in Romans 8:38-39 that are no match for God’s amazing love for you. Include 1 Corinthians 3:21-23; 1 Corinthians 15:23-28, and Ephesians 1:20-23 in your response.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “God is completely sovereign. God is infinite in wisdom. God is perfect in love. God in His love always wills what is best for us. In His wisdom He always knows what is best, and in His sovereignty He has the power to bring it about.” (Jerry Bridges)
  • Oct 6, 2019Celebrate the Good News – Dan Shurr
    Oct 6, 2019
    Celebrate the Good News – Dan Shurr
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Dan Shurr preached a sermon titled Celebrate the Good News  focusing on Luke 4:17-20.
     
    Questions
    Luke 4:17-20.
    ICEBREAKER: Do you have any siblings? What are/were they like?
    1. Luke 4:16-17 give us a brief glimpse into Jesus’ spiritual life along with the worship practices of the first century Jews. What do you learn from these verses, as well as Matthew 21:12-13; Luke 5:16; and Luke 11:1, that inspire your walk with the Lord?
    2. Jesus relied on the Holy Spirit throughout His earthly ministry [Luke 4:18; cf. Luke 4:1; Luke 10:21; Acts 10:38]. How do you live in light of the resources provided by the Holy Spirit? Consider Acts 1:8; 2 Corinthians 1:21-22; and Ephesians 5:15-20 as well.
    3. The text Jesus read in Nazareth’s synagogue was from Isaiah 61, which is clearly messianic. How would people identify the Messiah from this text? Did Jesus qualify? Examine other passages such as Matthew 4:17; Matthew 11:2- 6; Luke 8:26-33; and Luke 13:10-17.
    4. Jesus stopped reading Isaiah 61 halfway through verse 2 and did not read “...and the day of vengeance of our God.” Why do you think He stopped there? Consult also Matthew 20:28; John 1:29; John 3:17; and 1 Timothy 1:15.
    5. “To proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour” [Luke 4:19] refers back to the Jewish practice of the year of Jubilee [Leviticus 25:8-12]. From Jesus’ lips, the Jubilee year becomes a word picture of salvation. What should be our response to total debt forgiveness, according to this text and Matthew 18:32-33; Luke 5:24; Ephesians 4:32; and Colossians 3:12-13?
    6. Jesus claimed to be the fulfillment of Isaiah’s messianic prophecy [Luke 4:21]. However, by vs. 29, his hometown people completely turned against Him. What happened? What are your expectations of Jesus [cf. Matthew 16:21-23; Luke 24:21; and Acts 1:6]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “You don’t realize Jesus is all you need until Jesus is all you have.” (Tim Keller)
  • Sep 1, 2019Are We Ready? – Max Oates
    Sep 1, 2019
    Are We Ready? – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Max preached a sermon titled Are We Ready? focusing on 1 Peter 3:13-17.
     
    Questions
    1 Peter 3:13-17.
    ICEBREAKER: What would be on the menu for your favourite meal?
    1. The Apostle Peter wrote his first letter to challenge believers to live holy lives while facing a hostile culture [1 Peter 1:1; 2:11-12]. Where have you observed cultural hostility toward Christians lately? Do you find this surprising or not? Why?
    2. The specifics of “what is good” [1 Peter 3:13] are spelled out in 1 Peter 3:8-12. Why would anyone harm another for doing “what is good”? Consider 2 Corinthians 4:3-4, Ephesians 4:17-19, and 1 Peter 4:3-4 in your response.
    3. How can suffering for righteousness’ sake be a blessing [1 Peter 3:14]? Examine Matthew 5:10-12, Romans 8:16-22, 2 Corinthians 12:9-10, and Philippians 1:27-30 for clues.
    4. Historically, Christian communities have variously attempted to hide from the world, deride the world, or side with the world. But 1 Peter 3:15 calls us to come alongside the world with a ready answer for our faith. Where does this calling originate, and how are we to pursue it [cf. Matthew 28:19-20, Acts 1:8, 2 Corinthians 5:17-21]?
    5. What is “the hope that is in you” [1 Peter 3:15]? Consult Acts 24:14-15, Titus 2:11-14, and 1 John 3:2-3 for further insights.
    6. The gospel’s power to change lives resides in the Person of Christ Jesus and the accurate proclamation of the truth. However, the believer’s demeanour is also influential [1 Peter 3:16]. How do our approaches and attitudes affect unbelievers’ receptivity to the gospel according to this text, as well as Colossians 4:5-6, Titus 3:1-7, 1 Peter 2:12, and 1 Peter 3:1-2?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “What an incredible witness it is to a lost and fearful society when the Christian acts like a child of God, living under the loving sovereignty of the Heavenly Father.” (Henry Blackaby)
  • Jun 30, 2019I Need a Rest – Max Oates
    Jun 30, 2019
    I Need a Rest – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Max preached a sermon titled I Need a Rest focusing on Matthew 11:28-30.
     
    Questions
    Matthew 11.28-30
    ICEBREAKER: What is your favourite place in the world? Why?
    1. As John the Baptist languished in Herod’s prison [Matthew 11:2-3], he wrestled with some doubts regarding Jesus’ identity. How did Jesus address John’s concerns [11:4-6]? How do texts such as Isaiah 29:18, Isaiah 35:5, and Isaiah 61:1 relate to Jesus’ response?
    2. Three times Jesus asked the question, “What did you go out to see?” regarding John the Baptist’s ministry [Matthew 11:7-9]. What was John’s role according to this text and others such as Isaiah 40:1, Malachi 3:1, and Malachi 4:5-6?
    3. According to Matthew 11:11 as well as Matthew 5:19, Matthew 18:6, and Luke 9:46- 48, how does one become “great” in the kingdom of heaven and avoid being “least”?
    4. Neither John nor Jesus was able to get everyone to accept them [Matthew 11:16-19]. What was both John and Jesus looking for from the people they addressed [cf. Matthew 3:2, Matthew 4:1, and Matthew 11:20]? What does this response look like?
    5. Why do you think Jesus denounced the cities of Galilee and pronounced a greater degree of punishment on Judgement Day for them than some of the most wicked cities recorded in the Old Testament [Matthew 11:20- 24]? Examine Isaiah 1:1-20 and John 15:18-25 for further insights.
    6. Jesus promised “rest” for those who come to Him [Matthew 11:28-29]. What does that rest look like and what are the prerequisites for experiencing it according to John 14:1-6, Hebrews 4:1-16, and Revelation 22:17?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters. He restores my soul.” (King David)
  • May 12, 2019Parenting Your Adult Children – Deric Bartlett
    May 12, 2019
    Parenting Your Adult Children – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    On the Mother's day of 2019, Pastor Deric preached a sermon entitled Parenting Your Adult Children focused on Proverbs 23:22.
     
    Questions
    Proverbs 23:22
    ICEBREAKER: What is your favourite or most memorable “Mom” moment?
    1. Genesis 2:24 gives the reason a man leaves his parents to marry his wife. From this text, what are the implications for the parents who are left? If you have experienced this departure, either as a child or as a parent, what was it like?
    2. 3 John 4 is referring to spiritual children, but the principle can apply to the parenting process as well. What evidence are you looking for to discern whether your children are “walking in the truth”?
    3. The fifth commandment mandates the honouring of parents [Exodus 20:12]. Does this require that all children, including adult ones, should be expected to obey their parents at all times and in every way? Is it possible to honour parents without fully obeying them?
    4. What principles of parenting children do you glean from God’s comments to Abraham in Genesis 18:19?
    5. Proverbs 3:1-10 provides an excellent example of a godly parent passing on wise counsel to children of an unspecified age. Some of the counsel appears particularly relevant to older offspring as well [3:9]. Which of these proverbs would be fitting for your family members, and how would they apply?
    6. Part of parenting adult children is to encourage them to conduct themselves in a godly, responsible manner within the broader family of God. What good counsel comes from Paul in 1 Timothy 5:1-16 that applies to all ages?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “To learn strong faith is to endure great trials. I have learned my faith by standing firm amid severe testings.” [George Mueller]