Feb 21, 2021
This Man Walks on Water – Max Oates
This week, Pastor Max continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'This Man Walks on Water' based on Mark 6:45-52.
 
1. The battle is not for kingdoms, but for souls. (v. 45 – 48a)
 
2. The hero is not just a man, but God Himself. (v. 48b – 50)
 
3. The risk is not in the storm, but in the heart. (v. 52)
 
ICEBREAKER: What is the best location to fully enjoy a good cup of coffee?
 
  1. One of the most astonishing aspects of Jesus’ earthly life was His practice of prayer [Mark 6:46]. Why do you think Jesus prayed, and how does this impact your prayer life [cf. Matthew 26:36-44; Mark 1:35; Luke 5:16; and John 17:1-26]?
  2. Amid growing opposition to Jesus, and following a day of exhausting ministry, how does the description of the contrary wind and the disciples’ difficult lake crossing [Mark 6:48] contribute to Mark’s portrayal of discipleship [cf. Matthew 8:18-22; Matthew 19:16-22; and Luke 9:23-26]?
  3. What does the miracle of Jesus walking on the rough, windblown waters to be with His disciples reveal about Jesus [Mark 6:48]? Consider also John 1:1-5; 1 Corinthians 8:4-6; and Colossians 1:15-17.
  4. Apparently, first century people also believed in the paranormal as in our day, for the disciples feared the one walking on the water was a ghost [Mark 6:49]. What should believers think about the paranormal [cf. Deuteronomy 18:9-14; 1 Samuel 28:3-20; and Isaiah 8:19]?
  5. Whether your fears are well-founded or irrational, how are Jesus’ words in Mark 6:50 bringing you comfort and peace in these troubled times [cf. Exodus 14:13-14; Isaiah 41:13; Isaiah 43:1-2; and John 16:33]?
  6. In Mark 6:51-52, why does Mark expose the disciples’ lack of understanding and hard-heartedness with regard to the loaves? How are the miracles of the feeding of the 5000 and Jesus’ walking on water related? What was the lesson of the loaves that they were failing to grasp [cf. Mark 2:1-12; Mark 4:35-41; Mark 6:30-44; and John 6:14]?
  7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

“If God be our God, He will give us peace in trouble. When there is a storm without, He will make peace within. The world can create trouble in peace, but God can create peace in trouble.” (Thomas Watson)

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  • Feb 21, 2021This Man Walks on Water – Max Oates
    Feb 21, 2021
    This Man Walks on Water – Max Oates
    This week, Pastor Max continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'This Man Walks on Water' based on Mark 6:45-52.
     
    1. The battle is not for kingdoms, but for souls. (v. 45 – 48a)
     
    2. The hero is not just a man, but God Himself. (v. 48b – 50)
     
    3. The risk is not in the storm, but in the heart. (v. 52)
     
    ICEBREAKER: What is the best location to fully enjoy a good cup of coffee?
     
    1. One of the most astonishing aspects of Jesus’ earthly life was His practice of prayer [Mark 6:46]. Why do you think Jesus prayed, and how does this impact your prayer life [cf. Matthew 26:36-44; Mark 1:35; Luke 5:16; and John 17:1-26]?
    2. Amid growing opposition to Jesus, and following a day of exhausting ministry, how does the description of the contrary wind and the disciples’ difficult lake crossing [Mark 6:48] contribute to Mark’s portrayal of discipleship [cf. Matthew 8:18-22; Matthew 19:16-22; and Luke 9:23-26]?
    3. What does the miracle of Jesus walking on the rough, windblown waters to be with His disciples reveal about Jesus [Mark 6:48]? Consider also John 1:1-5; 1 Corinthians 8:4-6; and Colossians 1:15-17.
    4. Apparently, first century people also believed in the paranormal as in our day, for the disciples feared the one walking on the water was a ghost [Mark 6:49]. What should believers think about the paranormal [cf. Deuteronomy 18:9-14; 1 Samuel 28:3-20; and Isaiah 8:19]?
    5. Whether your fears are well-founded or irrational, how are Jesus’ words in Mark 6:50 bringing you comfort and peace in these troubled times [cf. Exodus 14:13-14; Isaiah 41:13; Isaiah 43:1-2; and John 16:33]?
    6. In Mark 6:51-52, why does Mark expose the disciples’ lack of understanding and hard-heartedness with regard to the loaves? How are the miracles of the feeding of the 5000 and Jesus’ walking on water related? What was the lesson of the loaves that they were failing to grasp [cf. Mark 2:1-12; Mark 4:35-41; Mark 6:30-44; and John 6:14]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “If God be our God, He will give us peace in trouble. When there is a storm without, He will make peace within. The world can create trouble in peace, but God can create peace in trouble.” (Thomas Watson)

  • Dec 27, 2020The King Visits a Governor – Max Oates
    Dec 27, 2020
    The King Visits a Governor – Max Oates
    This week, Pastor Max concludes the series "Christmas Visits" with a message titled 'The King Visits a Governor' based on John 18:28-40.

    1. Ask with an authentic heart (v. 28-34)
    . . . and seek His unique answer.
     
    2. Ask with a humble heart (v. 35-37)
    . . . and realize your need for His answer.
     
    3. Ask with a willing heart (v. 38)
    . . . and be prepared to wait for His answer.
     
    4. Ask with an honest heart (v. 39-40)
    . . . and be open to receive His answer.


    ICEBREAKER: What hobby do you think would be a lot of fun to get into? 1.One of the greatest ironies of history is found in John 18:28. The religious leaders did not enter the governor’s headquarters lest they defiled themselves. Yet they were illegally handing Jesus over for crucifixion. What does this indicate about what truly defiles [cf. Isaiah 1:10-20; Matthew 23:1-36; and Mark 7:1-23]? 2.John 18:30 records the greatest of all blasphemies – the religious leaders accusing Jesus of “doing evil”. What contributes to this kind of blatant wickedness that we should beware [cf. Mark 3:1-6; John 9:39-41; and Ephesians 4:17-19]? 3.It is apparent from John 18:31-32 that Jesus’ death was deliberate. Who was responsible, and why [cf. John 12:32; Acts 2:22-23; and Acts 3:12-16]? 4.The dialogue between Pilate and Jesus about kings and kingdoms [John 18:33-36] illuminated two drastically opposing views of power and authority. What do you learn from each of their perspectives? Consider also John 6:15; John 8:23; Revelation 1:5; and Revelation 11:15. 5.Jesus clearly communicated His life purpose in John 18:37. What is the truth according to Jesus, and why is it so important [cf. John 1:17; John 8:14; John 14:6; and 1 John 4:1-6]? 6.The confrontation between Pilate and Jesus portrays the defining moment for us all. Pilate appeared powerful but was being pressured by lies. Jesus appeared powerless but spoke the truth of another kingdom not of this world. Similarly, each of us must decide: What will I do with Jesus: crucify Him, or crown Him? Is He under me, or over me? What is your response? Look up John 19:6; Acts 2:36-39; and Acts 4:8-12 for more insights. 7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message? “Pilate’s skeptical sneer ‘What is truth?’ was addressed to Truth Himself, standing there right in front of his face. The world’s stupidest question was three words; God’s profoundest answer was one Word.” (Peter Kreeft)
  • Aug 23, 2020RESET:Worship – Part 2 – Max Oates
    Aug 23, 2020
    RESET:Worship – Part 2 – Max Oates
    Series: Reset 2020
    This week, Pastor Max shares Part 2 of his message 'RESET: Worship', based on Acts 2:42-47

    1. The Church Needs to Stand Out (v. 42-43)

    2. The Church Needs to Do Life Together (v. 44-46)

    3. The Church Needs to Reach the Lost (v. 47)

    ICEBREAKER:

    Do you think you have a pretty good work-life balance? Why or why not?

    1. The term translated “devoting” [Acts 2:42] contains the ideas of continually holding to, persisting in, and persevering in the apostles’ teaching. What does this look like today? What are you currently doing to devote yourself to sound teaching [cf. Ezra 7:10; Matthew 7:24-27; and Acts 17:11]?

    2. The early Christians’ key activities are recorded in Acts 2:42. What are modern parallels to these spiritual practices that you can participate in at CCBC [cf. Acts 1:14; Acts 20:7; and Hebrews 10:24-25]?

    3. It is noteworthy that when the early believers lived out their beliefs, awe and miracles followed. How can today’s church recapture the infl uence and impact of the early church [cf. Matthew 5:13-16; Ephesians 5:8-10; Philippians 2:14-16; and 1 Peter 2:11-12]?

    4. Does Acts 2:44-45 indicate the early Christians believed and behaved as “socialists”? Why or why not [cf. Luke 18:22; Acts 4:32-37; and Acts 6:1-6]?

    5. What do you learn about hospitality and true Christian fellowship from Acts 4:46 that can be put into action today [cf. Acts 16:32-34; Romans 12:9-13; and 1 Peter 4:9]?

    6. When the early church focused on its spiritual priorities, something amazing happened. What did the Lord do that shows us how to go on mission today [cf. John 15:4-5; Acts 6:7; and 2 Peter 3:18]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Without doubt the emphasis in Christian teaching today should be on worship. There is little danger that we shall become merely worshipers and neglect the practical implications of the gospel. No one can long worship God in spirit and in truth before the obligation to holy service becomes too strong to resist. Fellowship with God leads straight to obedience and good works. That is the divine order and it can never be reversed.” (A.W. Tozer)

  • Aug 16, 2020RESET:Worship Part 1 – Max Oates
    Aug 16, 2020
    RESET:Worship Part 1 – Max Oates
    Series: Reset 2020
    This week, Pastor Max continues the series 'Reset' with a message titled 'RESET:Worship' from Hebrews 13:7-16. This is part 1 of 2.

    1. Worship means being led (v. 7)

    2. Worship means staying faithful and focused (v. 8-10)

    3. Worship means stepping forward (v. 11-14)

    4. Worship means making a sacrifice. (v.15-16)

     

    ICEBREAKER:

    What is your favorite method of worshipping God? What do you find most challenging about worship?

    1. In verse 7, the author seems to be prescribing that we should look to spiritual leaders who have completed their years of service and passed on to their reward. Who would you look to that could fi ll this role? Why would it be helpful to study these kinds of leaders and in what ways might we imitate their faith? What does this verse imply about how we, as Christian leaders in the church today, live our lives in the world?

    2. How is Jesus an even better example of a leader we can follow? How does Jesus’ example of life and leadership contrast and compare to the examples of historical leaders you might look to? (v.8)

    3. What warning does the author plainly state? How would you apply that warning to our present world, community and society? How do you guard your body, mind and soul so as not to be tripped up by these things? (v.11-13)

    4. What 3 features in our lives should others see as the evidence of our commitment to Jesus and a response to His love for us? (v.14-16)

    5. What is the right response to our Christian church leaders of today? (v.17) What qualities in them are worth imitating? In what ways are you submitting to their authority?

    6. What did you find particularly helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Worship is the proper response of all moral, sentient beings to God, ascribing all honour and worth to their Creator- God precisely because He is worthy, delightfully so.” – D.A. Carson

  • May 31, 2020Living in Peace – Max Oates
    May 31, 2020
    Living in Peace – Max Oates
    Series: Shalom
    This week, Pastor Max continues the series 'Shalom' with a message titled 'Living in Peace' based on 2 Corinthians 13:11.
     

    1. Peace is birthed out of Joy.

    2. Peace grows in Relationship.

    3. Peace is founded on Holiness.

    4. Peace blossoms with Unity.

    5. Peace is coextensive with Love.
     

    ICEBREAKER: What do you rebel against?

    1. Surprisingly, some in the early church were not fans of the Apostle Paul. In 2 Corinthians, he defended his apostleship, outlining the price he had paid for serving Christ faithfully. Why does suffering play such an important role in the Christian life [cf. Matthew 5:10-12; Philippians 3:10-11; and James 5:10-11]?

    2. As Paul wrapped up 2 Corinthians, he gave a series of five commands followed by a promise. The form of each command calls for continuous activity from every believer. How is it possible for us to “rejoice” as a habitual way of life [cf. Psalm 40:16-17; Luke 10:20; Philippians 4:4-7; and 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18]?

    3. In addition to being called to continuous obedience, these commands are all plural. The call to “aim for restoration” borrows a term sometimes used in the mending of fishing nets [cf. Mark 1:19]. How does this word picture help you repair torn relationships? Consult also Romans 15:1-6; 1 Corinthians 1:10; Galatians 6:1-2; and James 5:19-20 for further insights.

    4. How is the promise of God’s presence in your life bringing you continual comfort and encouragement during your difficulties [cf. Luke 16:25; 2 Corinthians 1:3-7; 2 Corinthians 7:5-7]?

    5. How is it possible for believers to “agree with one another”, and why is this critical to our mission to the world [cf. John 13:34-35; Romans 12:16; Philippians 2:1-4; and Colossians 3:1-4]?

    6. The final command in this list promising “the God of love and peace will be with [you]” calls for us to continually “live in peace”. How do we do this, and what would it look like? Look up Romans 12:18; 1 Corinthians 1:10-13; Philippians 1:27; and 1 Thessalonians 5:12-15 for more clues.

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Peace comes when there is no cloud between us and God. Peace is the consequence of forgiveness, God’s removal of that which obscures His face and so breaks union with Him.” (Charles H. Brent)

     
  • Nov 24, 2019Great Expectations – Max Oates
    Nov 24, 2019
    Great Expectations – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    1. Two times David writes he “waits in silence for God” in this psalm [Psalm 62:1 & 5]. What does that look like? Does it mean do nothing, or is there some activity we must engage in? Consult also Psalm 27:14; Psalm 130:5-6; and Isaiah 40:28-31.
     
    2. Why does David use the images of a rock, a refuge, and a fortress [Psalm 62:2, 6-8]? Why were these images so meaningful to him [cf. 1 Samuel 23:24-29; 1 Samuel 30:6; 2 Samuel 5:17]? How do these images help you through life’s difficulties?
     
    3. David’s experience seems to mirror today. The current climate of our culture is characterized by mean-spiritedness. Everyone seems angry and personally offended by opposing viewpoints, resulting in yelling past one another, especially in social media. Have you ever experienced Psalm 62:3-4? Is there a better way to respond [ cf. Galatians 5:15; Ephesians 4:25-32; and James 1:19-21]?
     
    4. Faith, love and hope are expressed in other words in Psalm 62:8. Why are these 3 expressions so central to believers’ lives, and how do they strengthen us in the middle of hardships? Also examine Romans 5:1-5; 1 Thessalonians 1:3 and 5:8 for more insights.
    5. Psalm 62:9 addresses our human tendency toward self-importance. In our “selfie” and “viral” age, God’s Word reminds us we are but a “breath”. How does this word picture influence your self-awareness and priorities [cf. Genesis 1:26-27; Psalm 8:3-8; Psalm 144:3-4; James 4:13-14; and 1 John 3:1-3]?
    6. The Bible warns us to not set our hears on temporary material things, especially if they are unjustly gained [Psalm 62:10]. How can we keep material possessions from possessing us? Reflect also on Ecclesiastes 5:10-20; Matthew 6:19-24; and  Hebrews 13:5.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
  • Sep 1, 2019Are We Ready? – Max Oates
    Sep 1, 2019
    Are We Ready? – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Max preached a sermon titled Are We Ready? focusing on 1 Peter 3:13-17.
     
    Questions
    1 Peter 3:13-17.
    ICEBREAKER: What would be on the menu for your favourite meal?
    1. The Apostle Peter wrote his first letter to challenge believers to live holy lives while facing a hostile culture [1 Peter 1:1; 2:11-12]. Where have you observed cultural hostility toward Christians lately? Do you find this surprising or not? Why?
    2. The specifics of “what is good” [1 Peter 3:13] are spelled out in 1 Peter 3:8-12. Why would anyone harm another for doing “what is good”? Consider 2 Corinthians 4:3-4, Ephesians 4:17-19, and 1 Peter 4:3-4 in your response.
    3. How can suffering for righteousness’ sake be a blessing [1 Peter 3:14]? Examine Matthew 5:10-12, Romans 8:16-22, 2 Corinthians 12:9-10, and Philippians 1:27-30 for clues.
    4. Historically, Christian communities have variously attempted to hide from the world, deride the world, or side with the world. But 1 Peter 3:15 calls us to come alongside the world with a ready answer for our faith. Where does this calling originate, and how are we to pursue it [cf. Matthew 28:19-20, Acts 1:8, 2 Corinthians 5:17-21]?
    5. What is “the hope that is in you” [1 Peter 3:15]? Consult Acts 24:14-15, Titus 2:11-14, and 1 John 3:2-3 for further insights.
    6. The gospel’s power to change lives resides in the Person of Christ Jesus and the accurate proclamation of the truth. However, the believer’s demeanour is also influential [1 Peter 3:16]. How do our approaches and attitudes affect unbelievers’ receptivity to the gospel according to this text, as well as Colossians 4:5-6, Titus 3:1-7, 1 Peter 2:12, and 1 Peter 3:1-2?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “What an incredible witness it is to a lost and fearful society when the Christian acts like a child of God, living under the loving sovereignty of the Heavenly Father.” (Henry Blackaby)
  • Jul 28, 2019The Trouble with Forgiveness – Max Oates
    Jul 28, 2019
    The Trouble with Forgiveness – Max Oates
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Max continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled The Trouble with Forgiveness focusing on Micah 7:18-20.
     
    Questions
    Micah 7:18-20
    ICEBREAKER: Has anyone ever shown you mercy? What happened, and how did it make you feel?
    1. The minor prophet, Micah, lamented the many social ills of his day in Micah 7:1-6. Do you notice any parallels to today? Yet, he shared his hope in God’s restoration in Micah 7:7-17. Are you maintaining your hope in this chaotic world? How?
    2. Micah 7:18 begins with a question that expects the answer: “No one!” How do we know that God is unlike every other so-called “god”? What sets Him apart, according to this text as well as Numbers 14:18, 1 Kings 14:18, and Isaiah 55:7?
    3. Micah celebrates the forgiveness of the Lord in Micah 7:18 by writing that our God “pardons iniquity” and “passes over transgression”. What does this indicate about the reality of our offences, and the greatness of God’s grace?
    4. How do you reconcile the anger of God and the love of God [Micah 7:18]? Consider Exodus 34:6-7, Jeremiah 3:12-14, and Nehemiah 9:16-17 in your response.
    5. Mercy is the withholding of punishment or judgment that one deserves [Micah 7:19]. How has God shown you mercy? How can you show mercy to others [cf. Matthew 5:7, Matthew 9:9-13, and Matthew 18:23-35]?
    6. What are appropriate responses to God’s willingness to forgive us our sins [cf. Psalm 103:8-14, Matthew 18:21-22, Mark 11:25, Luke 7:44-47, and Ephesians 4:32]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Forgiveness is the economy of the heart. Forgiveness saves the expense of anger, the cost of hatred, the waste of spirits.” (Hannah More)
  • Jun 30, 2019I Need a Rest – Max Oates
    Jun 30, 2019
    I Need a Rest – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Max preached a sermon titled I Need a Rest focusing on Matthew 11:28-30.
     
    Questions
    Matthew 11.28-30
    ICEBREAKER: What is your favourite place in the world? Why?
    1. As John the Baptist languished in Herod’s prison [Matthew 11:2-3], he wrestled with some doubts regarding Jesus’ identity. How did Jesus address John’s concerns [11:4-6]? How do texts such as Isaiah 29:18, Isaiah 35:5, and Isaiah 61:1 relate to Jesus’ response?
    2. Three times Jesus asked the question, “What did you go out to see?” regarding John the Baptist’s ministry [Matthew 11:7-9]. What was John’s role according to this text and others such as Isaiah 40:1, Malachi 3:1, and Malachi 4:5-6?
    3. According to Matthew 11:11 as well as Matthew 5:19, Matthew 18:6, and Luke 9:46- 48, how does one become “great” in the kingdom of heaven and avoid being “least”?
    4. Neither John nor Jesus was able to get everyone to accept them [Matthew 11:16-19]. What was both John and Jesus looking for from the people they addressed [cf. Matthew 3:2, Matthew 4:1, and Matthew 11:20]? What does this response look like?
    5. Why do you think Jesus denounced the cities of Galilee and pronounced a greater degree of punishment on Judgement Day for them than some of the most wicked cities recorded in the Old Testament [Matthew 11:20- 24]? Examine Isaiah 1:1-20 and John 15:18-25 for further insights.
    6. Jesus promised “rest” for those who come to Him [Matthew 11:28-29]. What does that rest look like and what are the prerequisites for experiencing it according to John 14:1-6, Hebrews 4:1-16, and Revelation 22:17?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters. He restores my soul.” (King David)
  • Jun 23, 2019Our Place in God’s Commitment – Max Oates
    Jun 23, 2019
    Our Place in God’s Commitment – Max Oates
    Series: COMMITTED
    This week Pastor Max concludes the series Committed with a sermon titled Our Place in God's Commitment focusing on 1 Thessalonians 5:12-22
     
    Questions
    1 Thessalonians 5:12-22
    ICEBREAKER: Who were your role models when you were younger?
    1. Leaders are expected to work hard, to provide oversight on the Lord’s behalf, and to admonish those under their care. What is expected of those being led [1 Thessalonians 5:12-13], and how are they to do this according to this text as well as 1 Corinthians 16:15-18, Philippians 2:25-30 and Hebrews 13:17?
    2. The measure of a community’s character is in its treatment of the vulnerable. How are we encouraged to serve those who are hurting among us [1 Thessalonians 5:14]? What would this look like within our church family?
    3. Revenge seems sweet, but ultimately embitters us. How are followers of Jesus to respond when wronged [1Thessalonians 5:15; Matthew 5:38-48; Romans 12:17- 19; 1 Peter 3:9]?
    4. God’s will for believers’ lives is made clear in 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18. Rejoicing, praying, and giving thanks are commanded as habitual practices for every believer. How do we obey these within the context of our brutal, busy and broken world?
    5. How does one quench the Spirit [1 Thessalonians 5:19]? Consider Isaiah 63:10, Acts 5:3, Acts 7:51 and Ephesians 4:30 in your response.
    6. One of the functions of the Word of God is to train believers to be discerning [1 Thessalonians 5:20-22]. How does the Word of God accomplish this according to these verses as well as Psalm 19:7-14, Philippians 4:8, and 1 John 4:1-3?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Men compare themselves with men, and readily with the worst, and flatter themselves with that comparative betterness. This is not the way to see spots, to look into the muddy streams of profane men’s lives; but look into the clear fountain of the Word, and there we may both discern and wash them; and consider the infinite holiness of God, and this will humble us to the dust.” (Robert Leighton)
  • Mar 17, 2019Community Living Part 2-Max Oates
    Mar 17, 2019
    Community Living Part 2-Max Oates
    This week Pastor Max concludes the series Community Living with a sermon entitled Community Living - Part 2 focusing on Ephesians 4:25-32
     
    Questions
    Ephesians 4:25-32
    ICEBREAKER: What is your earliest childhood memory?
    1. Why does falsehood disrupt community? What are believers to substitute for falsehood [Ephesians 4:25], and what would this look like within our faith community?
    2. How is it possible to be angry and not sin [Ephesians 4:26]? How do you reconcile this with Jesus’ actions when He cleared the temple courts [cf. John 2:13-17]? Why is this a critical lesson to learn [4:27]?
    3. What do you learn from Ephesians 4:28-29 about overcoming evil behaviours and speech? How would you use this principle to counsel someone struggling with any sin?
    4. How do we grieve the Holy Spirit [cf. Acts 2:3-4; 1 Thessalonians 5:19], and what does this reveal about the Spirit’s identity [Ephesians 4:30]?
    5. What does this list of misbehaviours indicate about Christians [Ephesians 4:31]? How do we specifically put these things away [cf. Colossians 3:5- 11]?
    6. What should characterize our church relationships [Ephesians 4:32]? Where do we need to grow as church family? What might result if our community acted like this?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Nothing can be more cruel than the leniency which abandons others to their sin. Nothing can be more compassionate than the severe reprimand which calls another Christian in one’s community back from the path of sin.” (Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Life Together: The Classic Exploration of Christian Community)
  • Mar 10, 2019Community Living – Max Oates
    Mar 10, 2019
    Community Living – Max Oates
    This week Pastor Max begins the series Community Living with a sermon entitled Community Living - Part 1 focussing on 1 Peter 4: 8 -11
     
    Questions
    1 Peter 4: 8 - 11
    ICEBREAKER: If you were banished to a desert island, would you rather be stranded alone, or with your worst enemy? Why?
    1. In context, healthy church community life flows from a specific conviction [1 Peter 4:7]. What is that conviction, and how are we to conduct ourselves accordingly?
    2. Why is love such a priority for the Christian community [1 Peter 4:8a]? How have you experienced genuine Christian love within a church family?
    3. “Love covers a multitude of sins” [1 Peter 4:8b]. Does this mean sins should never be confronted? Explain the difference between covering sins and covering up sins.
    4. Is it possible to grumble while showing hospitality [1 Peter 4:9]? What does this reveal about human character? Under what circumstances could this occur?
    5. What are the privileges and responsibilities associated with being a “steward”, and how would one know if he/she was a “good” one [1 Peter 4:10]?
    6. What is the ultimate purpose in stewarding our spiritual gifts [1 Peter 4:11]? What is our role, and what is God’s role, in fostering healthy church community life?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “As the church, we are in community together trying to fulfill this Great Commission that Jesus left us with. As we gently press into each other, we form one united thing, His church. As we work together, sharing the space God gives us to do His work, we all become shaped a little different. We all become a little more like Him.” (Jennifer L. Lane)
  • Nov 25, 2018Waiting for a Miracle-Max Oates
    Nov 25, 2018
    Waiting for a Miracle-Max Oates
    This week Pastor Max preaches a sermon entitled Waiting for a Miracle focussing on Isaiah 8:11-17.
     
    Questions
    Isaiah 8:11-17.
     
    ICEBREAKER: Where would you like to be in life one year from today?
    1. For what reason had God become a stone of stumbling and snare to the people of Israel? (v.14) What would the outcome of that be for the nation?
    2. What does the use of the imagery of water signify in verses 6-8?
    3. What specifically do you think Isaiah was hoping in God for? (v.17) What was he waiting on God to do?
    4. How many verses from the book of Psalms can you find that speak about waiting on God? What is the outcome often associated with that? 5. Why do you think it’s sometimes necessary to wait on God? What are some reasons he may not act as quickly as we’d like?
    6. What is the most difficult thing for you about waiting on God?
    7. What are some ways we can be encouraging to others who are in a “season of waiting”?
    8. What did you find helpful or challenging about the message?
     
    "Biblically, waiting is not just something we have to do until we get what we want. Waiting is part of the process of becoming what God wants us to be.” – John Ortberg
  • Oct 14, 2018Merciful Saviour, Sovereign Lord
    Oct 14, 2018
    Merciful Saviour, Sovereign Lord

    This week Pastor Max preaches a sermon entitled Merciful Saviour, Sovereign Lord focussing on Ephesians 2:1-10.

    Questions
    Ephesisans 2:1-10
     
    ICEBREAKER: What was the high point of your week? What made it so great?
    1. What is the “course of the world” that the ungodly follow? (v.2) What does Paul mean when he says the world follows the “prince of the power of the air”?
    2. How has God’s merciful sovereignty changed the disobedience of mankind? (vv.4-5,8-9)
    3. What is your response to God’s plan for you mentioned in vv.6-7? How does this change the way you view the future? How does this change the way you live your life now?
    4. How is the principle outlined in verse 8 highlighted in the story of Jonah?
    5. What is God’s purpose for you outlined in verse 10? What does this mean for you personally?
    6. In what areas of your life do you need to start seeking the Lord in order to conform yourself to God’s plan for your life?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about the message?
     

    "Greater is Your care for me than all the care I am able to take from myself.” - Thomas à Kempis

  • Oct 7, 2018The Danger of Being Divided
    Oct 7, 2018
    The Danger of Being Divided

    This week Pastor Max preaches a sermon entitled The Danger of Being Divided focussing on 1 Corinthians 10:14-22.

    Questions
    1 Corinthians 10:14-22
     
    ICEBREAKER: What is the biggest misconception people tend to have about you?
    1. What do you think best describes the true nature of idolatry?
    2. In ancient times people used to worship a physical idol - what are some modern examples of idols?
    3. According to Jesus in Matthew 6:24, is it possible to serve God and other idols in our lives? How does this tie in with James 4:1-4?
    4. Read Galatians 5:19-21. What kinds of other sins are found in the same list as “rivalries, dissensions, divisions.” How does this indicate how serious disunity is in God’s eyes?
    5. List three attitudes or behaviours that might cause division in a church. What are the godly opposites of those things? What is the biblical remedy to correct those things?
    6. What steps do you need to take to avoid causing division among the people in your own life?  How can you better practice the godly virtues you listed above?
    7. Read 1 Kings 18:21. What bearing does Elijah’s question to Israel have on your own life?
    8. What did you find helpful or challenging about the message?
     

    "Believers are never told to become one; we already are one and are expected to act like it." - Joni Tada