Jul 5, 2020
Mission Reset – Deric Bartlett
Series: Reset 2020
This week, Pastor Deric starts a new series 'Reset 2020' with a messaged titled 'Mission RESET' based on Matthew 16:13-23

  1. The leader of the mission is Jesus Christ (v. 13ff)
  2. The goal of the mission is building His church (v. 18)
  3. The foundation of the mission is confessing Jesus as Lord (v.16, 17)
  4. The courage to engage the mission is bold (v.13, 18, 19-20, 23)
  5. The keys that unlock the mission are shared with the church (v. 19-20)  
  6. The threat to the mission is from within its ranks: (v.21 - 23)

ICEBREAKER:

Do you think you rely too heavily on your phone? Why or why not?

1. If Jesus was to ask His question recorded in Matthew 16:13 today, what answers do you think He would receive [cf. Matthew 12:22-32; Matthew 27:62-66; and John 10:30-33]?

2. In response to Jesus’ question, the disciples reported the popular perceptions of Jesus’ identity [Matthew 16:14]. What do these opinions reveal about Jesus, and about the crowds? How accurate were the crowds’ opinions? [cf. Matthew 17:9-13; Luke 9:7-9; and John 1:19-28]?

3. The disciples had been eyewitnesses to Jesus’ teaching and miracles for many months. Now, Jesus posed a question: “Who do you say that I am?” Why is this such a key question? What does it reveal about a true believer’s heart [cf. John 20:26-29; Romans 10:9-10; and Philippians 2:9-11]?

4. Peter’s confession of Jesus as “the Christ, the Son of the living God” [Matthew 16:16] showed he was beginning to grasp Jesus’ true identity. Do you agree with Peter’s assessment? What difference does Jesus’ identity make in life [cf. Matthew 14:28-33; John 6:66-69; and John 11:25-27]?

5. Jesus promised to build His church [Matthew 16:18], and not even the powers of death and darkness would overcome it. How is this promise giving you hope and encouragement in these difficult days [cf. Ephesians 2:19-22; 1 Timothy 3:14-16; and 1 Peter 2:4-12]?

6. Matthew 16:18-19 are a challenge. Is Peter the preeminent apostle? What are “the keys of the kingdom”, and how do we make sense of “binding” and “loosing”? Jesus was emphasizing the early apostles’ historical significance in founding His church, as clearly portrayed in the book of Acts. As followers of Jesus, what is our role today to continue advancing His church [cf. Matthew 28:19-20; Acts 1:8; and 2 Corinthians 5:17-21]?

7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

“The glory of the gospel is that when the church is absolutely different from the world, she invariably attracts it.” (Martyn Lloyd-Jones)

 
WatchNotesDownloadDateTitle
  • Jul 5, 2020Mission Reset – Deric Bartlett
    Jul 5, 2020
    Mission Reset – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Reset 2020
    This week, Pastor Deric starts a new series 'Reset 2020' with a messaged titled 'Mission RESET' based on Matthew 16:13-23

    1. The leader of the mission is Jesus Christ (v. 13ff)
    2. The goal of the mission is building His church (v. 18)
    3. The foundation of the mission is confessing Jesus as Lord (v.16, 17)
    4. The courage to engage the mission is bold (v.13, 18, 19-20, 23)
    5. The keys that unlock the mission are shared with the church (v. 19-20)  
    6. The threat to the mission is from within its ranks: (v.21 - 23)

    ICEBREAKER:

    Do you think you rely too heavily on your phone? Why or why not?

    1. If Jesus was to ask His question recorded in Matthew 16:13 today, what answers do you think He would receive [cf. Matthew 12:22-32; Matthew 27:62-66; and John 10:30-33]?

    2. In response to Jesus’ question, the disciples reported the popular perceptions of Jesus’ identity [Matthew 16:14]. What do these opinions reveal about Jesus, and about the crowds? How accurate were the crowds’ opinions? [cf. Matthew 17:9-13; Luke 9:7-9; and John 1:19-28]?

    3. The disciples had been eyewitnesses to Jesus’ teaching and miracles for many months. Now, Jesus posed a question: “Who do you say that I am?” Why is this such a key question? What does it reveal about a true believer’s heart [cf. John 20:26-29; Romans 10:9-10; and Philippians 2:9-11]?

    4. Peter’s confession of Jesus as “the Christ, the Son of the living God” [Matthew 16:16] showed he was beginning to grasp Jesus’ true identity. Do you agree with Peter’s assessment? What difference does Jesus’ identity make in life [cf. Matthew 14:28-33; John 6:66-69; and John 11:25-27]?

    5. Jesus promised to build His church [Matthew 16:18], and not even the powers of death and darkness would overcome it. How is this promise giving you hope and encouragement in these difficult days [cf. Ephesians 2:19-22; 1 Timothy 3:14-16; and 1 Peter 2:4-12]?

    6. Matthew 16:18-19 are a challenge. Is Peter the preeminent apostle? What are “the keys of the kingdom”, and how do we make sense of “binding” and “loosing”? Jesus was emphasizing the early apostles’ historical significance in founding His church, as clearly portrayed in the book of Acts. As followers of Jesus, what is our role today to continue advancing His church [cf. Matthew 28:19-20; Acts 1:8; and 2 Corinthians 5:17-21]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “The glory of the gospel is that when the church is absolutely different from the world, she invariably attracts it.” (Martyn Lloyd-Jones)

     
  • Jun 28, 2020The Original Storm Chaser – Deric Bartlett
    Jun 28, 2020
    The Original Storm Chaser – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Shalom
    This week, Pastor Deric conclude the series 'Shalom' with a message titled 'The Original Storm Chaser' based on Mark 4:35-41.
     
    1. Jesus prepares His people for the storm (v. 35)
    2. Jesus leads His people into the storm (v.35-37)
    3. He delivers His people through the storm (v.38-39)
    4. Jesus refines His people by the storm (v.40-41)

     

    ICEBREAKER:

    What is the funniest thing you’ve seen recently online?

    1. In context, Mark 4 records Jesus teaching His disciples about the kingdom of God. And then, in Mark 4:35-41, He shows them the kingdom of God in action.How would you describe the kingdom of God from Mark 4 [cf. Mark 9:1-13; Mark 10:13-16; and Mark 10:23-31]?

    2. Mark 4 begins and ends in a boat [Mark 4:1; 36-37]. How does it make you feel knowing that Jesus so identifi ed with humanity that He was willing to be “in the same boat” as us [cf. Isaiah 7:14; Matthew 1:21-23; and John 1:14]?

    3. Have you ever experienced feeling like your ship was sinking in a storm, or watched another go through a similar situation [Mark 4:37]? What did it feel like? What caused it? What did you learn from it [cf. Job 1:13-19; Jonah 1:4-6; and Acts 27:14-20]?

    4. What does the fact that Jesus was asleep in the boat’s stern, curled up on a cushion, tell you about both Jesus’ humanity and His divinity [cf. Matthew 4:2; John 4:6; and John 11:35]?

    5. What does Jesus’ calming of the storm by simply speaking to it indicate about His identity? Consult also John 1:3; Colossians 1:15-17; and Hebrews 1:8-12.

    6. Contrast the opposite reactions of fear and faith [Mark 4:40-41]. Why are we prone to fear? What role do life storms play in strengthening our faith? Examine Matthew 6:25-34; Matthew 14:28-33; and John 14:27 for further insights.

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “If God be our God, He will give us peace in trouble. When there is a storm without, He will make peace within. The world can create trouble in peace, but God can create peace in trouble.” (Thomas Watson)

  • Jun 21, 2020Shalom @ Home – Deric Bartlett
    Jun 21, 2020
    Shalom @ Home – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Shalom
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'Shalom' with a message titled 'Shalom @ Home' based on Deuteronomy 6:1-9.
     
    1. Feed your mind with the Word of God (v. 1-3)
    2. Fuel your heart with the Love of God (v. 4 – 5)
    3. Frame your life by the truth of God (v. 6 – 9)
     
    ICEBREAKER:
     
    What is a valuable lesson you learned from your father?
     
    1. Deuteronomy is the second giving of the law to the generation of Israelites about to enter into the Promised Land. What is commanded in Deuteronomy 6:1-3, and what were the promised results? And what is the link between obedience to God’s Word and fearing the LORD [cf. 1 Samuel 12:14; Psalm 19:7-9; and Proverbs 1:7-9]?
     
    2. The very heart of the Jewish faith is summarized in the confession of Deuteronomy 6:4. Jesus repeated it in Mark 12:29. It affirms the people’s allegiance to the LORD as well as His superiority over all others. Why is this confession central for worship [cf. Deuteronomy 7:7-11; Deuteronomy 10:12-17; and Mark 12:28-34]?
     
    3. Why is love for God an integral part of obedience [Deuteronomy 6:5]? Consult also Joshua 22:5; John 14:21; and 1 John 2:3-6.
     
    4. Why are we to love God with all our heart, soul and might [Deuteronomy 6:5]? How are you doing this in all these areas of life [cf. Deuteronomy 30:6; Joshua 23:6-11; and 1 Timothy 1:5]?
     
    5. How do you practice the discipleship principles listed in Deuteronomy 6:6-9 with your family and with your church family relationships? Examine Psalm 119:9, 11; Colossians 3:16-17; and 2 Timothy 2:2 for further insights.
     
    6. It is a human tendency to forget God’s great displays of grace in our lives [Deuteronomy 6:10-13]. How can we keep ourselves from taking God’s grace for granted [cf. Joshua 24:13-15; Nehemiah 9:24-26; and 2 Peter 1:9-15]?
     
    “To fall in love with God is the greatest romance; to seek him the greatest adventure; to find him, the greatest human achievement.” (Saint Augustine of Hippo)
  • Jun 14, 2020God’s City of Shalom – Deric Bartlett
    Jun 14, 2020
    God’s City of Shalom – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Shalom
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'Shalom' with a message titled 'God's City of Shalom' based on Isaiah 26:1-13.
     
    1. It’s a peaceful city 
    2. It’s a gated city  
    3. It’s an active city 
    4. It’s a protected city
    ICEBREAKER: What are you doing these days to try to stay in physical shape? 1. Isaiah 26 begins with a psalm of praise to be sung in the future (“in that day”) for the faithfulness of the LORD to protect His people. Salvation is likened to the walls, bulwarks and gates of a fortified city [Isaiah 26:1-2]. What does it look like to “keep faith” so one can enter into God’s refuge [cf. Psalm 24:3-6; 2 Timothy 4:7-8; and Revelation 21:1-7]? 2. According to Isaiah 26:3, what is key to unlocking God’s perfect peace in your life [cf. Jeremiah 17:7-8; John 14:27; and Philippians 4:6-7]? 3. The Scriptures often highlight the battle between humility and pride in human hearts. What are the outcomes of each attitude as depicted in Isaiah 26:4-6 [cf. Matthew 23:11-12; James 4:6, 10; 1 Peter 5:5]? 4. What are some benefits to living righteously according to Isaiah 26:7-9 [cf. Psalm 23:3; Psalm 25:4-5; and Matthew 6:25-34]? 5. The sad reality for many in our day, as in Isaiah’s, is presuming on the grace and mercy of God by persisting in sin [Isaiah 26:10-11]. How can believers graciously but clearly communicate the prospect of God’s impending judgment [cf. John 3:16-21; Romans 2:1-11; and 2 Peter 3:3-10]? 6. Isaiah 26:12-13 sing a note of hope for God’s oppressed people. What can believers anticipate for their future [cf. Psalm 29:11; Psalm 119:165; and Isaiah 9:6-7]? 7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message? “I’m not looking for peace on earth through a political solution. I’m a pastor. The Bible talks about three kinds of peace. There is peace with God. There’s the peace of God. And there’s peace with each other.” (Rick Warren)
  • Jun 7, 2020Goodness and Mercy All My Days – Deric Bartlett
    Jun 7, 2020
    Goodness and Mercy All My Days – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Shalom
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'Shalom' with a message titled 'Goodness and Mercy All My Days' based on Psalm 23.
     

    1.   We gain shalom in the knowledge of God (v. 1-3)

    2.   We experience shalom in the presence of God (v. 4-5)

    3.   We inherit shalom as the gift of God  (v. 6)    

    ICEBREAKER: Would you ride in a zeppelin if given a chance?

    1. This beloved psalm begins and ends with the personal Name of the LORD based on the verb “to be”, referring to God’s self-existing and eternal nature. It was often used when delivering His people from bondage. With this background, how comforting is it to call Him “my Shepherd” [Psalm 23:1]? Consider Isaiah 40:11; John 10:11-15; and 1 Peter 2:25 as well.

    2. Reflecting on the shepherding word picture, why do you think “green pastures” and “still waters” are significant for God’s “sheep” [Psalm 23:2]? Look up Ezekiel 34:11-16; John 10:9-10; and Revelation 7:16-17 as well.

    3. From Psalm 23:3, how does being led by the LORD in paths of righteousness help to restore your soul [cf. Psalm 19:7; Proverbs 4:11; and John 10:2-4]?

    4. David changed from writing about the LORD to writing to Him in Psalm 23:4, becoming even more personal. How is God’s presence in your life calming your fears through these difficult days [cf. Psalm 27:1; Isaiah 41:10; and Isaiah 43:1-2]?

    5. David switched metaphors in Psalm 23:5 to a royal banquet. How does it make you feel knowing the LORD views you as His favoured guest as depicted by the references to a table, anointing oil, and a full cup [cf. Psalm 16:5-6; John 14:1-4; and 1 Thessalonians 4:17]?

    6. Psalm 23:6 literally reads God’s goodness and mercy will “pursue me”. One of the best stories to illustrate this is King David’s gracious treatment of Mephibosheth, Jonathan’s crippled son [cf. 2 Samuel 9]. How does Psalm 23:6 give you hope in the middle of life’s current uncertainties [cf. Psalm 16:11; Psalm 27:4; Revelation 21:1-7, 22-27; and Revelation 22:1-6]?

    “When we think of the shepherd we think of a gentle meek nurturer of the lambs, but that is a highly filtered image. Shepherds were tough, blue-collar workers who did difficult work in difficult circumstances. Part of that work was leading the sheep, but the other part of that work was beating the wolves. Both were involved. So, the truth is that the rugged view of a shepherd is closer to reality than the gentle view of the shepherd. More precisely, for Jesus graciously to protect the sheep, he must vigorously destroy the enemy.” (Steven W. Smith)

  • May 24, 2020Peace Through the Cross – Deric Bartlett
    May 24, 2020
    Peace Through the Cross – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Shalom
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'Shalom' with a message titled 'Peace Through the Cross' based on Romans 5:1-11.
     
    1. Peace is  needed (v. 1)
    2. Peace is  promised (v. 1-5) 
    3. Peace is  experienced (v. 5 - 8)   
    4. Peace is  maintained  (v. 9 - 11)

     

    ICEBREAKER:What’s your best “my coworkers are crazy” story?

    1. Romans 5:1-2 speaks of at least three benefits for believers in Jesus Christ. What are these benefits, and what difference do they make [cf. Colossians 1:20; Ephesians 3:11-12; and Colossians 1:27]?

    2. How is it possible to “rejoice in our sufferings” [Romans 5:3]? How does the Holy Spirit work through our sufferings to help us grow in Christ-likeness [Romans 5:3-5]? Consult also Matthew 5:11-12; 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; and James 1:2-4.

    3. In Romans 5:6-8, humans are called “weak”, “ungodly”, and “sinners”. Is this an accurate portrayal of humanity? If so, what evidence would you provide for those who are skeptical [cf. Romans 3:9-18; Galatians 5:19-21; and Ephesians 2:1-3]?

    4. The bad news is humanity is in a spiritual mess. The good news is God never abandoned us [Romans 5:6-8]. How did God show His love for us, why did He love us, and what had we done to deserve His love? Also look up John 3:16; John 15:13; 1 Timothy 1:15; and 1 John 4:10.

    5. Both God’s love and wrath are clearly portrayed in Romans 5:8-9. How do you understand these seemingly contradictory aspects of God’s nature, why are they both necessarily crucial, and what do they teach us about our God [cf. Romans 1:18-32; 1 Thessalonians 1:10; and 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10]?

    6. Due to Christ’s death, we have been reconciled to God [Romans 5:10-11]. What does this mean, why was it necessary, and how does it impact how you live as Jesus’ follower [cf. Isaiah 53:5; 2 Corinthians 5:18-21; Ephesians 2:14-16; and Colossians 1:19-20]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “A man rejects God neither because of intellectual demands nor because of the scarcity of evidence. A man rejects God because of a moral resistance that refuses to admit his need for God.” (Ravi Zacharias)

  • May 17, 2020Jehovah Shalom – Deric Bartlett
    May 17, 2020
    Jehovah Shalom – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Shalom
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'Shalom' with a message titled 'Jehovah Shalom' based on Judges 6:11-24.
     
    1. The Lord INITIATES peace
    2. The Lord CONFIRMS peace
    3. The Lord DEFENDS peace

    ICEBREAKER:What tells you the most about a person?

    1. Judges 6:1-10 records the historical background to the story of Gideon. Why was Israel suffering [6:1], what were the consequences [6:2-6], and what spiritual issues did the nation need to address [6:7-10]? How does this apply to us today [cf. Deuteronomy 28:49-52; Joshua 24:14-15; and 2 Kings 17:7-20]?

    2. The unnamed prophet of Judges 6:8-10 reminded the broken Israelite nation of how God had delivered them from Egypt and entered into a covenant relationship with them. But they had been unfaithful. What is the value of regularly reminding ourselves of God’s salvation [cf. Jonah 2:1-9; 1 Corinthians 11:23-26; and 2 Peter 1:10-15]?

    3. Gideon appeared weak, but the LORD called him a “mighty man of valour” [Judges 6:11-12]. How does God’s promised presence in your life encourage you to trust Him in the middle of life’s challenges? Consider also Joshua 1:5; Isaiah 41:10; Matthew 28:20; and Hebrews 13:5-6

    4. Gideon’s story demonstrates that our God works through the weak to overcome the strong [Judges 6:13-16]. Why do you think God accomplishes His will in this way [cf. 1 Corinthians 1:26-31; 2 Corinthians 12:7-10; and Hebrews 11:32-34]?

    5. What is signified when a person gives an offering to the LORD [Judges 6:17-19]? What does it indicate when the LORD accepts an offering from His people [6:20-21]? Look up Leviticus 9:22-24; Romans 12:1; and 1 John 2:1-6 as well.

    6. The various names of God throughout the Scriptures reveal His character. How is God’s name, “Jehovah-Shalom”, meaning “The LORD Is Peace” [Judges 6:24], calming your anxious thoughts during these days of crisis? Meditate on Isaiah 9:6-7; Isaiah 26:1-3; John 16:33; and Philippians 4:6-7 for greater insights.

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “The happy sequence culminating in fellowship with God is penitence, pardon, and peace -- the first we offer, the second we accept, and the third we inherit.” (Charles H. Brent)

  • May 10, 2020Shalom from Generation to Generation – Deric Bartlett
    May 10, 2020
    Shalom from Generation to Generation – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Shalom
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'Shalom' with a message titled 'Shalom from Generation to Generation' based on Proverbs 3-1-12.
     
    1. Keep it RELATIONAL
    2. Keep it BIBLICAL
    3. Keep it BALANCED
    4. Keep it PROMISING
    5. Keep it FOCUSED

     

    ICEBREAKER:

    Share a favourite story about your mother, or an important lesson she directly or indirectly taught you.

    1. The book of Proverbs is not a collection of guaranteed promises. Rather, it contains wise observations of life that are generally true from a divine and eternal perspective. So, according to Proverbs 3:1-2, when people obey God’s Word, what three benefits often result [cf. Deuteronomy 30:15-20; Psalm 91:14-16; Psalm 119:165; and 1 Peter 3:8-12]?

    2. If people are characterized by “steadfast love” and “faithfulness” in all their thoughts, words and deeds, how likely is it that they will relate well to God and others [Proverbs 3:3-4]? Why or why not [cf. Deuteronomy 11:18-23; Psalm 85:10-13; and Micah 6:6-8]?

    3. Why is it wise to trust the Lord rather than our own understanding [Proverbs 3:5]? What does it look like to acknowledge the Lord in all our ways [Proverbs 3:6]? Consult also Jeremiah 9:23-24; Jeremiah 17:7-8; Romans 12:16; and 2 Timothy 3:15 for more insights.

    4. Do you think there is a correlation between fearing the Lord, and physical and spiritual wellness [Proverbs 3:7-8]? If so, what is it? If you think there is no correlation, why not [cf. Proverbs 3:13-18; Proverbs 26:12; Ecclesiastes 12:13-14]?

    5. Proverbs 3:9-10 uses a beautiful word picture to convey God’s blessing for those who put Him first in all aspects of life. What might this blessing look like today [cf. Malachi 3:8-12; Luke 6:38; Luke 14:12-14; and 1 John 3:17-18]?

    6. What are the physical and spiritual benefits of discipline [Proverbs 3:11-12]? Consider also Deuteronomy 8:5; John 15:2; and Hebrews 12:5-11 in your ponderings.

    "Never be afraid to trust an unknown future to a known God." (Corrie Ten Boom)

     
  • May 3, 2020The Blessing – Deric Bartlett
    May 3, 2020
    The Blessing – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Shalom

    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'Shalom' with a message called 'The Blessing' from Numbers 6:22-27.

    1. God Himself is the initiator of the SHALOM we need
    2. God’s people perpetuate SHALOM
    3. God’s blessing comes from KNOWING HIM
    4. God’s blessing is GOOD NEWS for the world


    ICEBREAKER:
    If you could choose your dreams, what would you prefer to dream about?

    1. In a world full of “false news”, misinformation, lies and deceit, how encouraged are you by the Bible’s claim that God has spoken to His people [Numbers 6:22]? Consider also Exodus 4:12-16; Matthew 4:4; 1 Thessalonians 2:13; and 2 Timothy 3:16-17.

    2. According to Numbers 6:23, what difference does it make to you that God desires to see His people blessed [cf. 1 Kings 8:54-61; 1 Chronicles 23:13; and Acts 3:26]?

    3. This priestly blessing of Numbers 6:24-26 was often used by the high priest after emerging from a sacrifice in the tabernacle [cf. Leviticus 9:22]. Why was a blessing so relevant following a sacrifice, and why does that matter to us today [cf. Hebrews 10:11-18; 1 John 2:1-2; and 1 John 4:7-12]?

    4. This blessing is actually stronger than a wish or prayer. It is the certain word of God pronounced over His people. How does the assurance of God’s life-enriching blessing and the promise of His protection [Numbers 6:24] calm your anxieties today? Meditate also on Psalm 17:6-9; Psalm 28:6-9; and Psalm 121:1-8.

    5. What do you think it means for someone’s face to shine on another [Numbers 6:25]? How does it make you feel knowing your gracious Heavenly Father looks with delight and favour on you, His beloved child [cf. Psalm 80:7, 19; 1 Corinthians 13:12; 2 Corinthians 4:5-6; and Revelation 22:4]?

    6. God’s grace and peace are the two main emphases in this blessing. What impact is God’s grace and peace having on you during these days of pandemic, fear and isolation? Examine Romans 16:20; 2 Peter 1:2-4; and Revelation 1:4-7 for further encouragement.

    “All the blessings we enjoy are Divine deposits, committed to our trust on this condition, that they should be dispensed for the benefit of our neighbours.” (John Calvin)

  • Apr 26, 2020God’s Plan for You – Deric Bartlett
    Apr 26, 2020
    God’s Plan for You – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Shalom

    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series ' Shalom' with a message called 'God's Plan For You'. Based on Jeremiah 29: 7, 11-14.

    1. God has a plan for your life
    2. God’s plan is for you is SHALOM
    3. God’s plan for you is revealed in prayer
    4. God’s plan is to bless you so that you bless others in His name

     

    ICEBREAKER: What does your perfect breakfast look like?

    1. In context, Jeremiah wrote a letter [Jeremiah 29:1] to the Jews exiled in Babylon explaining they would be there for a total of 70 years [Jeremiah 29:10]. This conflicted with others prophesying a short-lived exile and Babylon’s soon demise [Jeremiah 29:8-9]. In light of this background, what do you find amazing about Jeremiah’s instructions to the exiles in Jeremiah 29:4-7?

    2. God knew the Babylonian captivity of His people would last 70 years [Jeremiah 25:11-12; 29:10; and Daniel 9:1-2]. How does God’s knowledge of the future furnish you with hope and courage today [cf. 1 Corinthians 15:51-57; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18; 2 Peter 3:10-13; and Revelation 21:1-4]?

    3. How does the fact that Jeremiah 29:11 was given in the context of God disciplining His people refine your understanding of this favourite promise in His Word? Consult Jeremiah 31:16-20; Hebrews 12:5-11; and Revelation 3:19 for further insights.

    4. What do you learn about pursuing God from Jeremiah 29:12-13 [cf. Deuteronomy 30:1-5; 1 Kings 8:46-48; and Daniel 9:3-19]?

    5. The theme of believers being in exile is repeated throughout the Bible [Jeremiah 29:14]. How does this word picture help you navigate the challenges of living in the world today [cf. Zephaniah 3:14-20; Hebrews 11:13-16; and 1 Peter 2:11-12]?

    6. What does it mean to “seek the welfare of the city” where God has intentionally placed you [Jeremiah 29:7]? What would that look like [Romans 13:1-7; 1 Timothy 2:1-4; and 1 Peter 2:13-17]?

    “Seeking the welfare of our community in a world that is hostile to our faith is not for the squeamish. It’s not for the half-hearted or cynical or bewildered or angry or dispirited. And we can’t let resistance or resignation or resentment get in our way…But I can see that God wants me to get over my attitude problem with being an exile and dig in for the long haul.”

    (Tom Hobson)

  • Apr 19, 2020The Lord is My Helper – Deric Bartlett
    Apr 19, 2020
    The Lord is My Helper – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Shalom
    This week, Pastor Deric begin a new series 'Shalom' with a message tilted 'The Lord is My Helper'.

    1. He gives us peace (5)
    2. He gives us confidence (6)
    3. He gives us focus (7,8,9)
    4. He gives us courage (11-14)

     

    ICEBREAKER: What subjects should be taught in school but aren't?

    1. Why do you think the promise of God’s faithful presence [cf. Deuteronomy 31:6, 8; and Joshua 1:5] is linked to the twin commands of Hebrews 13:5 to be free from the love of money and to be content [cf. Philippians 4:11; 1 Timothy 3:3; and 1 Timothy 6:6-10]?

    2. How have past leaders influenced your life and faith [Hebrews 13:7]? How does Jesus’ consistent and faithful example give you comfort and courage in your present circumstances [cf. 1 Corinthians 11:1; 1 Thessalonians 1:6; and James 1:17]?

    3. What is it about grace that strengthens your heart as opposed to the performance of religious rituals [Hebrews 13:9-10]? Examine Romans 14:16-17; Ephesians 4:14; and Colossians 2:16-19 for more insights.

    4. How did the practice of the Old Testament sacrificial system point forward to the fulfillment in Christ’s final sacrifice for sin? What did Christ’s suffering accomplish for you [Hebrews 13:11-12]? Also consider Leviticus 16:27; Romans 3:24-26; and 2 Corinthians 5:21.

    5. After meditating on Christ’s sufferings [Hebrews 13:13], how are followers of Jesus to respond when insulted for Christ’s sake [cf. Luke 6:22; Luke 9:23-26; and 1 Peter 4:12-19]?

    6. According to Hebrews 13:14, what will help Jesus’ disciples value heaven over earth [cf. 2 Corinthians 5:1; Philippians 3:20-21; and 2 Peter 3:10-13]?

    “I know of nothing which so stimulates my faith in my Heavenly Father as to look back and reflect on His faithfulness to me in every crisis and every chilling circumstance of life. Over and over He has proved His care and concern for my welfare. Again and again I have been conscious of the Good Shepherd’s guidance through dark days and deep valleys.” (Phillip Keller)

  • Apr 12, 2020THE Easter Benediction – Deric Bartlett
    Apr 12, 2020
    THE Easter Benediction – Deric Bartlett
    Join us as we celebrate Easter. This week also concludes our series 'No Turning Back' as Pastor Deric shares a message called 'THE Easter Benediction'.
  • Apr 10, 2020The Betrayal, Arrest, Trial and Death of Jesus – Good Friday – Deric Bartlett
    Apr 10, 2020
    The Betrayal, Arrest, Trial and Death of Jesus – Good Friday – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Good Friday
    Deric shares a timeline of the events leading up to the crucifixion of Jesus.
    At the end, Max and Deric share instructions for communion, as Jesus shared with the disciples.
  • Apr 5, 2020The Kingdom That Cannot Be Shaken – Deric Bartlett
    Apr 5, 2020
    The Kingdom That Cannot Be Shaken – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message called 'The Kingdom That Cannot Be Shaken', based on Hebrews 12:18-29.
     
    Questions
     
    ICEBREAKER: Next to the Bible, what book has had the most significant impact on you? Why?
    1. Hebrews 12:18-21 captures the awesome scene from Exodus 19 when God gave the 10 Commandments. Why does the author of Hebrews refer to this terrifying event? What does it imply about the relationship between God and humanity under the old covenant [cf. Leviticus 16; Leviticus 23:26-32; and 2 Corinthians 3:13-15]?
     
    2. In this text, there is an obvious contrast between Mount Sinai [Hebrews 12:18-21] and Mount Zion [Hebrews 12:22-24]. What makes participation in Mount Zion so superior? What changes have occurred for those who trust Christ? Compare also Psalm 48; Isaiah 51:11; Ephesians 2:19-22; and Philippians 3:20-21.
    3. Jesus is the Mediator of a new covenant [Hebrews 12:24]. Why does His blood “speak a better word” than Abel’s [cf. Genesis 4:8-11; Matthew 23:29-35; and 1 Timothy 2:3-6]?
     
    4. We receive a serious warning in Hebrews 12:25 to listen when God communicates to us. Why do some refuse to listen, and why do others listen? Investigate Ezekiel 3:4-9; Romans 2:5; and James 1:21 for more clues.
     
    5. Our world is currently being shaken to its foundations. What are the “things that are shaken” [Hebrews 12:27] that will one day be entirely removed, and what are “the things that cannot be shaken” that will remain forever [cf. Psalm 102:25-28; Isaiah 65:17-25; and Romans 8:18-25]?
     
    6. According to Hebrews 12:28-29, what do we have to look forward to despite the struggles of this present world? How should we be living in light of our bright future [ cf. Daniel 2:44; Daniel 7:14; and 1 Peter 1:3-5]?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The way to Heaven is ascending; we must be content to travel uphill, though it be hard and tiresome, and contrary to the natural bias of our flesh.” (Jonathan Edwards)

  • Mar 29, 2020A Family Chat about Hardship – Deric Bartlett
    Mar 29, 2020
    A Family Chat about Hardship – Deric Bartlett

    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message called 'A Family chat about Hardship', based on Hebrews 12:5-17.

    QUESTIONS

    ICEBREAKER: Who is the most interesting person you’ve met and talked with? Why?

    1. How does the practice of reflecting on Jesus’ endurance [Hebrews 12:3] help you persevere [cf. Mark 15:15-24; Galatians 6:9; and 1 Peter 2:21-24]?
     
    2. Is Jesus worth the sacrifice of your life [Hebrews 12:4]? Why or why not [cf. Mark 8:34-38; Acts 7:54-60; Romans 12:1; and Revelation 6:9-11]?
     
    3. Why do so many avoid discipline? Why does God include it in our development as disciples [Hebrews 12:5-6]? Consult Deuteronomy 8:2-5; 1 Corinthians 11:27-32; and Revelation 3:19 for more insights.
     
    4. According to Hebrews 12:7-8, what does God’s discipline indicate about our status? What is its purpose? How do these verses also apply to parenting [cf. Proverbs 19:18; Proverbs 29:15, 17; and Ephesians 6:4]?
     
    5. Recall a time during your upbringing when you were legitimately disciplined. What did you learn from that experience that has helped shaped you into a mature person? How does this relate to the point of Hebrews 12:9-10 [cf. Genesis 18:19; Deuteronomy 6:4-9; 1 Samuel 2:22-25, 29, 3:11-13; Proverbs 22:6]?
    6. What are the long-term benefits to being trained through discipline [Hebrews 12:11]? Meditate on 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; 1 Timothy 4:7-8; and 1 Peter 1:6-9 for further ideas.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
    “He remembers our frame and knows that we are dust. He may sometimes chasten us, it is true, but even this He does with a smile, the proud, tender
    smile of a Father who is bursting with pleasure over an imperfect but promising son who is coming every day to look more and more like the One whose child he is.” (A.W. Tozer)