Feb 14, 2021
The Master’s Math Lesson – Brad Lehman
This week, Pastor Brad continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Master's Math Lesson: The Feeding of the 5000' based on Mark 6:30-44.
  1. Prioritize rest to recharge your reserves [Mark 6:30-32].
  2. Pray for a compassionate heart for others [Mark 6:33-36].
  3. Exhaust your human resources [Mark 6:37-38].
  4. Let your Master do the math [Mark 6:39-44].
  5. Meager resources grow exponentially when entrusted to Jesus.
ICEBREAKER: How into self-improvement are you? In what areas?
  1. Why is rest so essential for followers of Jesus [Mark 6:31]? How are you incorporating rest into your regular routine [cf. Genesis 2:1-3; Mark 1:35; and Luke 5:16]?
  2. What does compassion look like in practical terms, and how does a follower of Jesus develop it [Mark 6:34]? Examine Luke 7:11-15; Luke 15:20-24; and Colossians 3:12-15 for more ideas.
  3. Why do sheep require a shepherd [Mark 6:34]? Why does Jesus uniquely qualify to be our Shepherd [cf. Psalm 23; Ezekiel 34:1-16; and John 10:1-18]?
  4. Why do you think God sometimes gives seemingly impossible assignments to His people [Mark 6:37]? What do these assignments require of us? What do they require of God [cf. Exodus 3:7-22; Numbers 11:10-23; and Matthew 19:23-26]?
  5. Children played significant roles in Jesus’ earthly ministry [Mark 6:38; cf. John 6:9]. Why do you think this was so [cf. Matthew 18:1-4; Mark 10:13-16; and Luke 9:46-48]?
  6. What did the beheading of John the Baptist [Mark 6:24-29] forebode for Jesus? Why is following Jesus costly? Do you believe Jesus is worth suffering for? Why or why not? [cf. Luke 9:23-26; John 12:25-26; and Revelation 12:11]?
  7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
“Compassion asks us to go where it hurts, to enter into the places of pain, to share in brokenness, fear, confusion, and anguish. Compassion challenges us to cry out with those in misery, to mourn with those who are lonely, to weep with those in tears. Compassion requires us to be weak with the weak, vulnerable with the vulnerable, and powerless with the powerless. Compassion means full immersion in the condition of being human.” (Henri J.M. Nouwen)
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  • Feb 14, 2021The Master’s Math Lesson – Brad Lehman
    Feb 14, 2021
    The Master’s Math Lesson – Brad Lehman
    This week, Pastor Brad continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Master's Math Lesson: The Feeding of the 5000' based on Mark 6:30-44.
    1. Prioritize rest to recharge your reserves [Mark 6:30-32].
    2. Pray for a compassionate heart for others [Mark 6:33-36].
    3. Exhaust your human resources [Mark 6:37-38].
    4. Let your Master do the math [Mark 6:39-44].
    5. Meager resources grow exponentially when entrusted to Jesus.
    ICEBREAKER: How into self-improvement are you? In what areas?
    1. Why is rest so essential for followers of Jesus [Mark 6:31]? How are you incorporating rest into your regular routine [cf. Genesis 2:1-3; Mark 1:35; and Luke 5:16]?
    2. What does compassion look like in practical terms, and how does a follower of Jesus develop it [Mark 6:34]? Examine Luke 7:11-15; Luke 15:20-24; and Colossians 3:12-15 for more ideas.
    3. Why do sheep require a shepherd [Mark 6:34]? Why does Jesus uniquely qualify to be our Shepherd [cf. Psalm 23; Ezekiel 34:1-16; and John 10:1-18]?
    4. Why do you think God sometimes gives seemingly impossible assignments to His people [Mark 6:37]? What do these assignments require of us? What do they require of God [cf. Exodus 3:7-22; Numbers 11:10-23; and Matthew 19:23-26]?
    5. Children played significant roles in Jesus’ earthly ministry [Mark 6:38; cf. John 6:9]. Why do you think this was so [cf. Matthew 18:1-4; Mark 10:13-16; and Luke 9:46-48]?
    6. What did the beheading of John the Baptist [Mark 6:24-29] forebode for Jesus? Why is following Jesus costly? Do you believe Jesus is worth suffering for? Why or why not? [cf. Luke 9:23-26; John 12:25-26; and Revelation 12:11]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
    “Compassion asks us to go where it hurts, to enter into the places of pain, to share in brokenness, fear, confusion, and anguish. Compassion challenges us to cry out with those in misery, to mourn with those who are lonely, to weep with those in tears. Compassion requires us to be weak with the weak, vulnerable with the vulnerable, and powerless with the powerless. Compassion means full immersion in the condition of being human.” (Henri J.M. Nouwen)
  • Oct 25, 2020Rule Breaker – Brad Lehman
    Oct 25, 2020
    Rule Breaker – Brad Lehman
    This week, Pastor Brad continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Rule Breaker' based on Mark 2:18-28.
     
    1. Feast with Jesus [Mark 2:18-22
    2. Be free in Jesus [Mark 2:23-28]
    3. Jesus is the Rule Breaker because He is the Rule Maker.

    ICEBREAKER: How did you get that scar of yours?

    1.What is the purpose of fasting, and how can it be practiced in a spiritually beneficial way [Mark 2:18]? Consider also 2 Chronicles 20:1-4; Ezra 8:21-23; Matthew 6:16-18; and Acts 13:1-3.

    2.Why is the imagery of a bridegroom so significant in the Scriptures [Mark 2:19-20]? How does it inspire hope for your future? Examine also Isaiah 54:5-6; Isaiah 62:4-5; Matthew 22:1-10; and Revelation 19:6-9.

    3.Why was the bridegroom going to be taken away from His followers [Mark 2:20]? Where was He headed [cf. Matthew 20:28; John 10:17-18; 1 Timothy 2:5-6; and 1 Peter 3:18]?

    4.There was a deliberate contrast between “new” and “old” in Jesus’ two word pictures of patching a garment and pouring wine into wineskins [Mark 2:21-22]. What do you think was Jesus’ point, and what difference does it make [cf. Galatians 4:1-7; Colossians 2:16-23; and Hebrews 10:1-4]?

    5.In Mark 2:25-26, Jesus referred to the story of David eating bread that was set aside for only the priests [1 Samuel 21:1-6]. How does this story demonstrate the intended blessing of the Sabbath [Mark 2:27]? Look at Genesis 2:1-3; Isaiah 58:6-14; and Matthew 12:9-13 for more insights.

    6.What was Jesus claiming when He referred to Himself as “lord even of the Sabbath” [Mark 2:28]? What difference does this make in the life of every disciple [cf. John 1:1-3; Colossians 1:15-17; and Hebrews 1:1-4]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “When Jesus came to earth, demons recognized him, the sick flocked to him, and sinners doused his feet and head with perfume. Meanwhile he offended pious Jews with their strict preconceptions of what God should be like. Their rejection makes me wonder, could religious types be doing just the reverse now? Could we be perpetuating an image of Jesus that fits our pious expectations but does not match the person portrayed so vividly in the Gospels?” (Philip Yancey)

     
  • Mar 8, 2020Cornering A Con – Brad Lehman
    Mar 8, 2020
    Cornering A Con – Brad Lehman
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Brad shares a message called 'Cornering A con', based on the book of Philemon.
     
    1. The witnesses of a con: Find faithful accomplices [Philemon 1:1-3].
    2. The victim of a con: Respond to victimization by refreshing others [Philemon 1:4-7].
    3. The cornering of a con: Let God corner the useless to convert them to useful [Philemon 1:8-16].
    4. Climbing into a con’s corner: Identify with the guilty [Philemon 1:17-22].
    5. Greetings from more accomplices: Praise God for His grace [Philemon 1:23-25]. Let Jesus climb into your corner.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What do you wish someone taught you a long time ago?
     
    1. What prayer principles do you pick up from Paul’s prayer in Philemon 1:4-7? Compare with other Scriptures such as 1 Corinthians 1:4-9; Ephesians 1:15-19; and 1 Thessalonians 1:2-5.
     
    2. How does a believer refresh “the hearts of the saints” [Philemon 1:7, 20]? What would that look like? Consult also Matthew 11:28-30; 1 Corinthians 16:15-18; and 2 Corinthians 7:13-16 for further insights.
     
    3. Paul wrote that he had become the “father” of Onesimus during his imprisonment [Philemon 1:10]. What does this show about their spiritual relationship? What impact does the analogy of a “father” have for those who serve in Christ’s church [cf. Acts 20:25-35; 1 Corinthians 4:14-21; and 1 Thessalonians 2:9-12]?
     
    4. Have you ever felt or been called “useless” [Philemon 1:11]? Who or what prompted this reaction? How does the good news of Christ restore one to “usefulness” [cf. Luke 19:1-10; 1 Timothy 1:12-16; and 2 Timothy 2:20-21]?
     
    5. The world focuses on status symbols, titles, power, fame and wealth. In contrast, Christ’s gospel elevates all who trust Him to His beloved family members [Philemon 1:15-17]. How does this changed perspective influence how you treat each member of your church family [cf. Ephesians 6:5-9; Colossians 3:22-24; and 1 Timothy 6:1-2]?
     
    6. How does Paul’s language in Philemon 1:17-19 echo that of the gospel? How does Paul’s advocacy on Onesimus’ behalf imitate Christ for us? How can we do this for others? Consider Luke 15:1-7; Acts 9:26-30; and Romans 15:7 for more ideas.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Wherever Jesus has been proclaimed, we see lives change for the good, nations change for the better, thieves become honest, alcoholics become sober, hateful individuals become channels of love, unjust persons embrace justice.” (Josh McDowell)
  • Apr 19, 2019The Monster Lurking Below_Brad Lehman
    Apr 19, 2019
    The Monster Lurking Below_Brad Lehman
    Series: One off
    On Good Friday of 2019, Pas. Brad Lehman preached a Sermon titled The Monster Lurking Below focusing on Hebrews 2: 14-18.