Nov 17, 2019
Our Great High Priest – Deric Bartlett
This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Our Great High Priest focusing on Hebrews 4:14-16
 
Questions
Hebrews 4: 14 - 16
ICEBREAKER: What scene in a movie always gives you goosebumps every time you watch it?

1. Why is it necessary for us to have Jesus, God’s Son, as our great high priest [Hebrews 4:14; cf. 2:17; 3:1]? What has He done for us that we could not do, and why does it matter? Consult also Matthew 26:64; John 14:1-4; John 20:17; and Titus 2:11-14.
2. How are we to “hold fast to our confession” [Hebrews 4:14]? Look for clues in Matthew 28:9; Acts 4:1-22; Acts 5:27-33; 2 Thessalonians 2:15; Revelation 2:13; and Revelation 3:11.
3. Why does it matter to you that Jesus, your high priest, is fully able to sympathize with your weaknesses [Hebrews 4:15]? What does this tell you about how much God loves you? See also Psalm 103:8-13; Isaiah 53:4-6; Matthew 4:2; John 4:6; John 19:28; and 2 Corinthians 5:21.
4. Jesus faced temptation just like us, “yet without sin” [Hebrews 4:15]. How does this fact influence your perspective on temptation and your strategy to overcome it? Examine also Matthew 4:1-11; Matthew 26:36-46; and 1 Peter 2:21-25.
5. The “throne of grace” may refer to the mercy-seat above the ark of the covenant in the Old Testament tabernacle and temple [cf. 2 Kings 19:15; 1 Chronicles 13:6; Psalm 99:1]. In any case, it points to the presence of God. Since Jesus, our high priest, has entered into God’s presence for us [Hebrew 4:14], what are we now able to do [Hebrews 4:16]? Reflect also on Isaiah 55:6-7; Matthew 7:7-11; Romans 5:1-2; and Philippians 4:6-7.
6. Hebrews 4:16 promises God’s timely help just when needed. Why do we specifically need mercy and grace? Can you think of an instance when God came to your rescue at just the right time with just what you needed? See some biblical examples in Daniel 6:16-23; Matthew 8:23-27; and Matthew 14:28-33.
7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
 
“It seems to me that Jesus is qualified to sympathize, to understand, to provide encouragement, and to be depended on. Jesus is to be valued by his followers. Is not the incarnation of the Son of God and his corresponding trials while here not comforting to the wounded heart?...Run to Jesus with your wounded heart and encourage others to do the same; for he is exalted in his children’s weakness.” (Erik Raymond)
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  • Nov 17, 2019Our Great High Priest – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 17, 2019
    Our Great High Priest – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Our Great High Priest focusing on Hebrews 4:14-16
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 4: 14 - 16
    ICEBREAKER: What scene in a movie always gives you goosebumps every time you watch it?

    1. Why is it necessary for us to have Jesus, God’s Son, as our great high priest [Hebrews 4:14; cf. 2:17; 3:1]? What has He done for us that we could not do, and why does it matter? Consult also Matthew 26:64; John 14:1-4; John 20:17; and Titus 2:11-14.
    2. How are we to “hold fast to our confession” [Hebrews 4:14]? Look for clues in Matthew 28:9; Acts 4:1-22; Acts 5:27-33; 2 Thessalonians 2:15; Revelation 2:13; and Revelation 3:11.
    3. Why does it matter to you that Jesus, your high priest, is fully able to sympathize with your weaknesses [Hebrews 4:15]? What does this tell you about how much God loves you? See also Psalm 103:8-13; Isaiah 53:4-6; Matthew 4:2; John 4:6; John 19:28; and 2 Corinthians 5:21.
    4. Jesus faced temptation just like us, “yet without sin” [Hebrews 4:15]. How does this fact influence your perspective on temptation and your strategy to overcome it? Examine also Matthew 4:1-11; Matthew 26:36-46; and 1 Peter 2:21-25.
    5. The “throne of grace” may refer to the mercy-seat above the ark of the covenant in the Old Testament tabernacle and temple [cf. 2 Kings 19:15; 1 Chronicles 13:6; Psalm 99:1]. In any case, it points to the presence of God. Since Jesus, our high priest, has entered into God’s presence for us [Hebrew 4:14], what are we now able to do [Hebrews 4:16]? Reflect also on Isaiah 55:6-7; Matthew 7:7-11; Romans 5:1-2; and Philippians 4:6-7.
    6. Hebrews 4:16 promises God’s timely help just when needed. Why do we specifically need mercy and grace? Can you think of an instance when God came to your rescue at just the right time with just what you needed? See some biblical examples in Daniel 6:16-23; Matthew 8:23-27; and Matthew 14:28-33.
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “It seems to me that Jesus is qualified to sympathize, to understand, to provide encouragement, and to be depended on. Jesus is to be valued by his followers. Is not the incarnation of the Son of God and his corresponding trials while here not comforting to the wounded heart?...Run to Jesus with your wounded heart and encourage others to do the same; for he is exalted in his children’s weakness.” (Erik Raymond)
  • Nov 10, 2019Face to Face with Jesus – Phil Webb
    Nov 10, 2019
    Face to Face with Jesus – Phil Webb
    Series: One off
    This week Phil Webb preached a sermon titled Face to Face With Jesus focusing on Luke 18:18 - 29
     
    Questions
    Luke 18: 18 - 29
    ICEBREAKER: What takes a lot of time but is totally worth it?

    1. The story of the ruler’s question [Luke 18:18-30] follows immediately after Jesus welcomed little children [Luke 18:15-17]. What do you think of the ruler’s question [v. 18] in light of the preceding verse [v. 17], along with John 6:28-29; Acts 16:30-31, and Ephesians 2:8-10? Do you think his question was sincere? Why or why not?
    2. Why do you think Jesus introduced the 10 Commandments to assess the ruler’s spiritual condition [Luke 18:20-22]? How might you use them to share the gospel with unbelievers [cf. Romans 7:7-12; Romans 13:8-10; and Galatians 3:10-14]?
    3. What was the one thing the ruler lacked [Luke 18:22-23]? What do you think was going on in the ruler’s heart? What needed to happen for him to inherit eternal life [cf. John 3:15-17; 1 Timothy 1:15-16; and 1 John 5:10-13]?
    4. Is Jesus commanding all wealthy people to sell everything and distribute the proceeds to the poor in order to follow Him [Luke 18:22]? How should believers view wealth based on this text, as well as Ecclesiastes 5:10-20; Matthew 6:19-24; and 1 Timothy 6:5-10?
    5. How should wealthy believers relate to the poor based on Luke 18:22, as well as Proverbs 14:21 & 31; Luke 12:13-21; Acts 4:32-37; 1 Timothy 6:17-19; and James 2:1-13?
    6. A common misconception is that riches indicate favour while poverty indicates disfavour. Jesus appeared to discourage this wealthy ruler, much to the shock of those with Him [Luke 18:24-26]. According to Jesus, “then who can be saved” to experience God’s favour [Luke 18:27- 30]? Consult also Luke 18:9-14; Luke 19:1-10; and Acts 9:1-6, 17-22.
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “If we discover a desire within us that nothing in this world can satisfy, also we should begin to wonder if perhaps we were created for another world.” (C.S. Lewis)
  • Nov 3, 2019Good News About REST – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 3, 2019
    Good News About REST – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Good News About Rest focusing on Hebrews 4:1-13
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 4: 1 -13
    ICEBREAKER: What incredibly common thing have you never done?

    1. The term “rest” is central to this passage. Look up Genesis 2:2 (God’s rest after creation), Numbers 13-14 (the Promised Land rest), Psalm 95:7-11 (God’s rest still available in David’s day), and Hebrews 4:1, 10-11. Why is “rest” so important?
    2. Hearing the good news is a significant first step [Hebrews 4:2]. But faith needs to accompany it. Reread Numbers 13:25-14:10 and contrast the two opposite responses to the opportunity to enter the Promised Land. What do you notice about true faith?
    3. The future for God’s people is described as “rest” [Hebrews 4:3-11]. What do believers have to look forward to in God’s rest? Consult also Genesis 2:2-3; Exodus 20:11; Exodus 31:17; and Matthew 11:28-30.
    4. Entering into God’s rest depends on the condition of one’s heart [Hebrews 4:6-7]. A disobedient, hard heart hinders the experience of God’s rest. What specifically shows a disobedient, hard heart in this text, along with Isaiah 6:9-10; John 12:36-43; and Acts 19:8-10?
    5. The author of Hebrews referred to several Old Testament texts throughout Hebrews 3:7-4:10 before writing of the discerning power of the Word of God in Hebrews 4:12. From this text, as well as Psalm 19:7-14; 2 Timothy 3:16-17; and 1 Peter 1:22-25, what effect does God’s Word have on human hearts?
    6. Few today think seriously about having to give an account for their thoughts, attitudes and actions. But Hebrews 4:13 warns of the certainty of the day of judgment. Therefore, how should we live in light of our accountability before God? Examine 1 Chronicles 28:9; 2 Chronicles 6:30; Ecclesiastes 12:13-14; Romans 2:16; and 1 Corinthians 4:5 for further insights.
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “You have made us for Yourself, O Lord; and our heart is restless until it rests in You.” (Augustine)
  • Oct 27, 2019The Beautiful Strokes of God – Allan Gallant
    Oct 27, 2019
    The Beautiful Strokes of God – Allan Gallant
    Series: One off
    This week Allan Gallant preached a sermon titled The Beautiful Strokes of God focusing on Romans 8:28-29.
     
    Questions
    Romans 8:28 - 29
    ICEBREAKER: What is the most clever or funniest use of advertising you’ve seen?

    1. Romans 8:28 assures believers that “all things work together for good”. What does this tell you about the character and power of God? How does this assurance help you when times are tough [cf. Romans 5:3-5; 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; and James 1:2-4].
    2. What does it mean “to be conformed to the image of His Son” [Romans 8:29]? If this is God’s purpose for every believer’s life, how does this goal impact how we live [cf. 2 Corinthians 3:16-18; Ephesians 1:5; Ephesians 4:22-24]?
    3. Romans 8:31 tells us that no one can be against believers when God is for them. What is the greatest proof that God is for us, according to Romans 8:32? What promise can we hold on to in Romans 8:32 to help us through trying times [cf. Romans 4:24-25; Romans 5:6-8; Ephesians 5:1-2]?
    4. Romans 8:33-34 uses the word picture of a law court. In this context, who serves as the judge, the prosecuting attorney, the defence attorney, and the accused? How is the accused acquitted of all charges in this spiritual courtroom? Are you able to identify [cf. Isaiah 54:17; Zechariah 3:1-5; John 5:24; Romans 8:1]?
    5. How does Christ’s love for you enable you to be more than a conqueror despite the many and various difficulties of life [Romans 8:35-37]? Consult also Matthew 5:10; John 16:33; and 2 Corinthians 12:10.
    6. Are you completely convinced of God’s great love for you? Spend some quiet moments reflecting on each of the threats listed in Romans 8:38-39 that are no match for God’s amazing love for you. Include 1 Corinthians 3:21-23; 1 Corinthians 15:23-28, and Ephesians 1:20-23 in your response.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “God is completely sovereign. God is infinite in wisdom. God is perfect in love. God in His love always wills what is best for us. In His wisdom He always knows what is best, and in His sovereignty He has the power to bring it about.” (Jerry Bridges)
  • Oct 20, 2019The Hard Heart – Deric Bartlett
    Oct 20, 2019
    The Hard Heart – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled The Hard Heart focusing on Hebrews 3:7 - 19.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 3:7 - 19
    ICEBREAKER: When someone finds out what you do, or where you are from, what question do they always ask you?

    1. Hebrews 3:7-11 is a quote from Psalm 95:7-11 that reflects back on an incident when Israel grumbled against Moses and the Lord [cf. Numbers 17:1-7]. What prompted the complaints? Do you think they were valid? Have you ever been tempted to question the Lord during trying times?
    2. How does a person “harden” his/her “heart” [Hebrews 3:8]? What contributes to a hardened heart [cf. Exodus 17:1-7; Proverbs 28:14; Zechariah 7:12; Matthew 13:15; Romans 2:5]? What can be done to remedy this condition?
    3. Going astray in one’s heart is related in Hebrews 3:10 to not knowing the Lord’s “ways”. What are the Lord’s “ways”? Consult also Deuteronomy 8:5-10; Psalm 138 (especially verse 5); and Revelation 15:1-4.
    4. We are commanded to beware of an unbelieving heart [Hebrews 3:12]. Part of that defensive strategy is to enlist the help of other believers [Hebrews 3:13]. What should we include in our exhortations to one another from this text, as well as Acts 14:22; Romans 12:1-2; 1 Thessalonians 5:11; and Hebrews 10:24-25?
    5. What is “our original confidence” that we are to hold firm to the end [Hebrews 3:14]? Examine Luke 8:15; 1 Corinthians 15:1-11; and Hebrews 10:19-23 for more clarity.
    6. Hebrews 3:16-18 poses a series of questions to highlight the hard hearts and unbelief [Hebrews 3:15, 19] of the Exodus generation of Israel. Using the terms found in these verses, what do we need to watch out for so that our hearts remain “soft” to God’s voice? Include Deuteronomy 9:18; 1 Samuel 15:22-23; Psalm 106:6-43; and Ephesians 5:3-13 in your response.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Better a shattered heart than a hardened heart.” (Woodrow Kroll)
  • Oct 13, 2019Faithful – Deric Bartlett
    Oct 13, 2019
    Faithful – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Faithful focusing on Hebrews 3:1 - 6.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 3:1 - 6
    ICEBREAKER: What are you most thankful for on this Thanksgiving Day weekend?

    1. What is the “heavenly calling” we share in together in Hebrews 3:1? Consult Philippians 3:14; 2 Thessalonians 2:14; 2 Timothy 1:9; and 1 Peter 5:1, 10 for further insights. How does this hope encourage you today?
    2. We are commanded to “consider Jesus” in Hebrews 3:1. List the various titles and descriptions of our Saviour in Hebrews 3:1-6 and reflect on their significance in God’s plan of salvation, as well as the impact on your personal life.
    3. The term “faithful” and related phrases appear in Hebrews 3:1-6 at least 4-5 times, indicating, through repetition, a central theme of the text. Who are the ones called “faithful”, how do they demonstrate faithfulness, and what difference do their examples make? Also consider Numbers 12:1-8 (Moses); Psalm 100 (God); and Colossians 1:7 (church servant).
    4. Moses is a towering figure in the Old Testament Scriptures. In Hebrews 3:1-6, Moses and Jesus are compared and contrasted. According to this passage, in what ways are they similar? And in what ways is Jesus superior? Why do you think this matters?
    5. Hebrews 3:4 declares an absolute truth: God is the builder of all things. This impacts the household of faith that is being built in this text. But it also affects all of life. How does your understanding of God as Creator influence your worship and walk each day? Examine Genesis 1; Psalm 19:1-6; and Romans 1:18-25 to go deeper.
    6. Hebrews 3:6 contains the condition that if we are of God’s household of faith, we must hold fast our confidence and hope in Christ. How do you understand this “if” phrase, and how do you “hold fast” in practical ways? Use Matthew 10:22; Matthew 13:3-8, 18-23; Philippians 2:12-13; and Colossians 1:21-23 to gain further clarity.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Everything about God is great, vast, incomparable. He never forgets, never fails, never falters, never forfeits His word. To every declaration of promise or prophecy the Lord has exactly adhered, every engagement of covenant or threatening He will make good.” (A.W. Pink)
  • Oct 6, 2019Celebrate the Good News – Dan Shurr
    Oct 6, 2019
    Celebrate the Good News – Dan Shurr
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Dan Shurr preached a sermon titled Celebrate the Good News  focusing on Luke 4:17-20.
     
    Questions
    Luke 4:17-20.
    ICEBREAKER: Do you have any siblings? What are/were they like?
    1. Luke 4:16-17 give us a brief glimpse into Jesus’ spiritual life along with the worship practices of the first century Jews. What do you learn from these verses, as well as Matthew 21:12-13; Luke 5:16; and Luke 11:1, that inspire your walk with the Lord?
    2. Jesus relied on the Holy Spirit throughout His earthly ministry [Luke 4:18; cf. Luke 4:1; Luke 10:21; Acts 10:38]. How do you live in light of the resources provided by the Holy Spirit? Consider Acts 1:8; 2 Corinthians 1:21-22; and Ephesians 5:15-20 as well.
    3. The text Jesus read in Nazareth’s synagogue was from Isaiah 61, which is clearly messianic. How would people identify the Messiah from this text? Did Jesus qualify? Examine other passages such as Matthew 4:17; Matthew 11:2- 6; Luke 8:26-33; and Luke 13:10-17.
    4. Jesus stopped reading Isaiah 61 halfway through verse 2 and did not read “...and the day of vengeance of our God.” Why do you think He stopped there? Consult also Matthew 20:28; John 1:29; John 3:17; and 1 Timothy 1:15.
    5. “To proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour” [Luke 4:19] refers back to the Jewish practice of the year of Jubilee [Leviticus 25:8-12]. From Jesus’ lips, the Jubilee year becomes a word picture of salvation. What should be our response to total debt forgiveness, according to this text and Matthew 18:32-33; Luke 5:24; Ephesians 4:32; and Colossians 3:12-13?
    6. Jesus claimed to be the fulfillment of Isaiah’s messianic prophecy [Luke 4:21]. However, by vs. 29, his hometown people completely turned against Him. What happened? What are your expectations of Jesus [cf. Matthew 16:21-23; Luke 24:21; and Acts 1:6]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “You don’t realize Jesus is all you need until Jesus is all you have.” (Tim Keller)
  • Sep 29, 2019Merciful and Faithful – Deric Bartlett
    Sep 29, 2019
    Merciful and Faithful – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Merciful and Faithful focusing on Hebrews 2: 14 - 18.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 2: 14 - 18.
    ICEBREAKER: What were some games you played as a child?
    1. Hebrews 2:14 asserts that Jesus, the Pioneer of our salvation, shared in our humanity, becoming flesh and blood like us. Why is the full humanity of Jesus an essential part of God’s plan of salvation? Consult Matthew 8:23-24; Luke 4:1-2; John 1:14; John 4:5-6; and John 11:35 for further insights.
    2. According to Hebrews 2:14-15, what are the results of Jesus’ death, and why are these accomplishments so significant? Compare Romans 8:1-3; 1 Corinthians 15:54-57; Colossians 1:13-15; and 2 Timothy 1:10 as well.
    3. Why do you think death is fearful and enslaving? How do texts such as Hebrews 2:15, as well as Psalm 23:4; Isaiah 25:6-9; Luke 20:34-36; 1 Corinthians 15:26; and Revelation 21:4 give you a different perspective that is full of hope and encouragement?
    4. Who are “the offspring of Abraham” [Hebrews 2:16]? Examine Genesis 15:6; Isaiah 41:8; Luke 19:8-10; Romans 4:16-22, and Galatians 3:6-9 for clarification.
    5. What role does a high priest play [Hebrews 2:17], and why do you think it is helpful to know Jesus is merciful and faithful? Consider such texts as Hebrews 4:15-16; Hebrews 5:1-6; Hebrews 8:1-3; 1 John 2:1-2; and 1 John 4:10 in your response.
    6. Do you find it helpful to know Jesus suffered and was tempted just as we are? Why or why not? Look up Matthew 4:1-11; 2 Timothy 4:16-18; James 1:2-4, 12; and 2 Peter 2:9 for more input.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “No man knows how bad he is till he has tried very hard to be good. A silly idea is current that good people do not know what temptation means. This is an obvious lie. Only those who try to resist temptation know how strong it is...We never find out the strength of the evil impulse inside us until we try to fight it: and Christ, because He was the only man who never yielded to temptation, is also the only man who knows to the full what temptation means...” (C.S. Lewis)
  • Sep 22, 2019A Focused Faith – Deric Bartlett
    Sep 22, 2019
    A Focused Faith – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled A Focused Faith focusing on Hebrews 2: 1-13
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 2:1-13.
    ICEBREAKER: Who has been the greatest influence on your Christian life, and why?
    1. Believers are urged to pay closer attention to what we have heard [Hebrews 2:1] so we won’t drift away from following Christ. In context, what specifically are the things “we have heard”? Also consult 1 Corinthians 15:1-8; Philippians 2:5-11; Colossians 1:13-20; and 1 Timothy 2:5-6.
    2. The author of Hebrews warns that believers can “neglect such a great salvation” by ignoring it or treating it with disregard [Hebrews 2:3]. How do we prevent this from happening according to this text, as well as Acts 4:8-12; Acts 28:23-28; Romans 13:11-14; Philippians 2:12-13; and Titus 2:11-14?
    3. Hebrews 2:6-8 (a quote from Psalm 8:4-6) reflects on the God-given exalted dignity and privileged position over creation of every member of the human race. Do you see yourself as God sees you? Why or why not? Do you see others as God sees them? Compare such texts as Genesis 1:26-28; Psalm 8; 2 Corinthians 3:17-18; James 3:8-10; and 1 John 3:1-3.
    4. The entire earthly life and ministry of Jesus is succinctly summarized in Hebrews 2:9. By way of contrast, He accomplished what fallen humanity could not [Hebrews 2:6-8]. What has Jesus achieved for us, and why does it matter? Examine John 3:16; Romans 3:21-26; Ephesians 2:13- 22; and 2 Timothy 1:8-10 as well.
    5. The believer can look forward to future glory [Hebrews 2:10]. However, the road to glory passes through sufferings, just as our Saviour experienced. How does this text, along with Romans 8:16-17; 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; Philippians 1:27-31; and Colossians 1:21-24, strengthen you for the challenges of the Christian life?
    6. Jesus is not ashamed to call believers His sisters and brothers [Hebrews 2:11-13]. How does this make you feel, and how does it influence your living? Include Luke 8:19-21; Romans 8:28-30; and Jude 1:1-2 in your discussion.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “People don’t drift toward holiness; they drift toward compromise and call it tolerance, and drift toward disobedience and call it freedom.” (D. A. Carson)
  • Sep 15, 2019The Greatest Claims in History – Deric Bartlett
    Sep 15, 2019
    The Greatest Claims in History – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled The Greatest Claims in History focusing on Hebrews 1:1-14.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 1:1-14.
    ICEBREAKER: If you could add two commandments to the existing ten, what would they be?
    1. The author of Hebrews emphasizes that God had spoken to us – in the past through the prophets, and in the present in His Son [Hebrews 1:1-2]. What does this tell us about God and the authority of His word? Consider Exodus 20:1-20, 2 Timothy 3:16-17, and 2 Peter 1:19-21 as well.
    2. Hebrews 1:1-4 contains one of the most exalted and comprehensive descriptions of Jesus found in all of Scripture. What does this text affirm about Jesus’ identity and activity, and how do each of these descriptions impact your spiritual walk with Him?
    3. Many false ideas about angels exist today. What do the following texts assert about them: Matthew 13:41-42; Matthew 22:30; Matthew 25:31; Luke 16:22; Luke 20:30; Acts 27:23-25; Acts 10:3, 22; Colossians 1:16; and Hebrews 2:7?
    4. Throughout Hebrews 1, Jesus is referred to as the Son [Hebrews 1:2, 3, 5, 8]. From this chapter, what is the significance of this title for Jesus, and why does it matter?
    5. How does Hebrews 5:8 affirm the deity of Jesus? Examine also Isaiah 9:6-7; Matthew 1:23; John 10:30; and Titus 2:13 for more Scriptural support. Why is this important?
    6. In Hebrews 1:14, angels are called “ministering spirits” sent to serve believers. Do you find this concerning, confusing, or comforting? How do such passages as 2 Kings 6:15-17; Isaiah 6:6-7; Psalm 34:7, Acts 1:11 and Matthew 28:1-7 encourage you?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The ultimate key to joining together in radical obedience to Christ is found in fostering a humble view of ourselves and a high view of God in the church. [Let us] give ourselves in total abandonment for His great purpose in the world: the declaration of His gospel and the demonstration of His glory to all the peoples of the earth.” (David Platt)
  • Sep 8, 2019No Turning Back Introduction – Deric Bartlett
    Sep 8, 2019
    No Turning Back Introduction – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric begins the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Introduction to Studies in the Book of Hebrews focusing on Hebrews 12:1-3.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 12:1-3
    ICEBREAKER: Describe an embarrassing incident that happened in elementary school.
    1. Hebrews 1:1 - 4 contains at least 7 descriptions of Jesus, God’s Son, showing the reasons He is God’s supreme revelation. How many can you identify from this text, and what difference does each make in your daily walk with the Lord?
    2. “To drift” implies a gradual change over time [Hebrews 2:1]. Apparently, this was, and still is, a very real danger for believers. Based on this text, what can we do to prevent drifting away? Also consult Deuteronomy 4:9-10, Proverbs 4:23, Acts 20:28 - 31, and Romans 16:17 - 18 for more strategies.
    3. How do you, as one of God’s holy people who shares in a heavenly calling, practice the discipline of “consider(ing) Jesus” [Hebrews 3:1]? Examine Philippians 2:5 - 11, Colossians 1:13 - 20, Hebrews 4:14 - 16, and 1 Peter 2:21 - 23 for further insights.
    4. The struggle to not fall away, to not be hardened by sin’s deceitfulness, and to not rebel against God’s voice [Hebrews 3:12 - 15] requires the help of God’s people to exhort us each day [Hebrews 3:13]. What does this exhortation include according to this text, as well as Acts 14:19 - 23; Colossians 3:12 - 17, and Revelation 3:14 - 22?
    5. Believers are commanded to “hold fast to our confession” [Hebrews 4:14]. This does not refer to confessing our sins, but to publicly proclaiming our allegiance to Christ. How do we best do this according to this text, as well as 1 Timothy 6:12, Hebrews 3:1, and Hebrews 10:19 - 25?
    6. How does Jesus’ example in Hebrews 12:1 - 3 motivate you to run the Christian race with endurance? Look closely at 1 Corinthians 9:24 - 27, 1 Timothy 4:6 - 8, and James 5:7 - 11 for other inspiring examples of endurance.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “To endure the cross is not tragedy; it is the suffering which is the fruit of an exclusive allegiance to Jesus Christ.” (Dietrich Bonhoeffer)
  • Sep 1, 2019Are We Ready? – Max Oates
    Sep 1, 2019
    Are We Ready? – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Max preached a sermon titled Are We Ready? focusing on 1 Peter 3:13-17.
     
    Questions
    1 Peter 3:13-17.
    ICEBREAKER: What would be on the menu for your favourite meal?
    1. The Apostle Peter wrote his first letter to challenge believers to live holy lives while facing a hostile culture [1 Peter 1:1; 2:11-12]. Where have you observed cultural hostility toward Christians lately? Do you find this surprising or not? Why?
    2. The specifics of “what is good” [1 Peter 3:13] are spelled out in 1 Peter 3:8-12. Why would anyone harm another for doing “what is good”? Consider 2 Corinthians 4:3-4, Ephesians 4:17-19, and 1 Peter 4:3-4 in your response.
    3. How can suffering for righteousness’ sake be a blessing [1 Peter 3:14]? Examine Matthew 5:10-12, Romans 8:16-22, 2 Corinthians 12:9-10, and Philippians 1:27-30 for clues.
    4. Historically, Christian communities have variously attempted to hide from the world, deride the world, or side with the world. But 1 Peter 3:15 calls us to come alongside the world with a ready answer for our faith. Where does this calling originate, and how are we to pursue it [cf. Matthew 28:19-20, Acts 1:8, 2 Corinthians 5:17-21]?
    5. What is “the hope that is in you” [1 Peter 3:15]? Consult Acts 24:14-15, Titus 2:11-14, and 1 John 3:2-3 for further insights.
    6. The gospel’s power to change lives resides in the Person of Christ Jesus and the accurate proclamation of the truth. However, the believer’s demeanour is also influential [1 Peter 3:16]. How do our approaches and attitudes affect unbelievers’ receptivity to the gospel according to this text, as well as Colossians 4:5-6, Titus 3:1-7, 1 Peter 2:12, and 1 Peter 3:1-2?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “What an incredible witness it is to a lost and fearful society when the Christian acts like a child of God, living under the loving sovereignty of the Heavenly Father.” (Henry Blackaby)
  • Aug 25, 2019The Fight of Faith – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 25, 2019
    The Fight of Faith – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric concludes the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled The Fight of Faith focusing on Ephesians 6:10-20.
     
    Questions
    Ephesians 6:10-20
    ICEBREAKER: Describe a memorable uncle.
    1. The Apostle Paul’s famous discourse on the Christian’s spiritual armour [Ephesians 6:10-20] falls on the heels of his instructions for godly relationships in the home [Ephesians 5:21-6:9]. Do you think the home is a potential battleground? In what ways? Are relationships at risk from the evil one? Why do you think he attacks relationships?
    2. It is always dangerous to get our spiritual beliefs from pop culture. How does our culture view the supernatural world? What is the truth as outlined in Ephesians 6:11,12, 16, 18, as well as 2 Corinthians 10:4-6, James 4:7, and 2 Peter 5:8-9?
    3. What do you infer from all the battle imagery and terminology in Ephesians 6:10-20? How does this make you feel? How should you best prepare [cf. 1 Corinthians 16:13, Romans 13:11-14, 2 Corinthians 2:11]?
    4. Several times in this text [Ephesians 6:11, 13, 14], we are challenged to stand firm in the face of formidable foes. This requires great courage. How does each piece of God’s spiritual armour encourage you to prevail?
    5. What are some of the evil one’s “flaming arrows” [Ephesians 6:16] that need to be extinguished? Consult Genesis 3:1-5, Matthew 4:1-10, John 8:44, 2 Corinthians 11:3-4, and 1 John 3:4-10 for further insights.
    6. Why is persevering prayer so crucial to spiritual warfare [Ephesians 6:18-20]? What does this say about the best strategy to overcome evil [cf. Matthew 6:13; Matthew 26:41; Philippians 4:6-7; and Colossians 4:2-4]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The tragedy today is that many Christians think they are fighting flesh and blood in their marital and parenting issues, rather than realizing that Satan has an agenda to destroy their home. Whoever controls the family controls the future.” (Tony Evans, Victory in Spiritual Warfare)
     
    “You are not fighting for victory—you are fighting from victory. This battle has already been won!” (Tony Evans, Victory in Spiritual Warfare)
  • Aug 18, 2019Delivered From All My Fears – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 18, 2019
    Delivered From All My Fears – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Delivered From All My Fears focusing on Psalms 34:1-10
     
    Questions
    Psalms 34:1-10
    ICEBREAKER: Do you have any phobias?
    1. The most often repeated command in the Bible is, “Do not fear!” [Examples: Exodus 20:20; Joshua 8:1; Luke 1:30; Revelation 2:10]. To overcome your fears, you must be able to identify them and admit them. What are your most debilitating fears? How are they hindering your walk with the Lord as well as your relationships with others?
    2. Examine Numbers 13:17-14:10. How did the Israelites’ fear of the people of Canaan affect their choices and actions [Numbers 14:9-10]? Notice the correlation of fear and rebellion against God’s clearly revealed will. What conclusions do you draw from this story?
    3. In Isaiah 7, King Ahaz and his people feared invading armies [Isaiah 7:1-2]. The prophet Isaiah challenged him to trust in the Lord’s deliverance [7:3-9], and even offered a sign to confirm the prophecy [7:10-11]. Ahaz refused the sign under the pretense of piety, but he was covering up his unbelief. God gave him the sign anyway – the birth of a child named Immanuel (“God with us”) [7:13-14]. How does the promise of God’s presence address your fears? What is the best strategy to face your fears based on this text?
    4. Psalm 139:23-24 is King David’s sincere prayer for God’s examination of his heart and innermost thoughts. He requested God’s light to expose his darkness. Note the relationship between his anxious thoughts and grievous ways. What does this show you about the detrimental effects of your fears? How does this insight help you combat your fears?
    5. Near the end of Jesus’ time with His disciples, He told them he was going to leave them [John 13:36; 14:28]. Obviously, they found this news distressing [14:1]. To counter their anxieties, Jesus offered them His peace [14:27]. What is distinctive about His peace, and Who brings it to us [14:26]?
    6. Philippians 4:4-7 provides God’s strategy for dealing with believers’ fearful anxieties. Meditate on these verses and come up with a list of definite steps you can take to experience His promised peace.
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Faith, which is trust, and fear are opposite poles. If a man has the one, he can scarcely have the other in vigorous operation. He that has his trust set upon God does not need to dread anything except the weakening or the paralyzing of that trust.” (Alexander MacLaren)
  • Aug 11, 2019Healing for the Heart – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 11, 2019
    Healing for the Heart – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Healing for the Heart focusing on Proverbs 14:30.
     
    Questions
    Proverbs 14:30
    ICEBREAKER: Have you ever had a physical wound that took you a period of time to recover from? What was it, and what was the recovery process like?
    1. For Christians, the center-point of our faith is what Jesus accomplished on the cross. What initially comes to your mind when you think of the cross, and why Jesus died for us?
    2. Think about a diamond. It has many sides, called facets, and these all make up the shape of the stone. Keep this illustration in mind as you reflect on the cross. What different pictures—or facets—do we see from Scripture about the cross, and about what Jesus accomplished there? Look up the following passages, note down observations, then discuss your findings together (see Colossians 2:13-15; Acts 2:23; Mark 2:17; 10:45; John 1:29; Romans 3:23-25; Galatians 3:13-14; Ephesians 2:11-16; 5:25-27; Titus 3:3-7; Hebrews 2:14-18; 1 Peter 2:24-25; Isaiah 53:5).
    3. When we have grasped the message of the cross and how we can have forgiveness through Jesus and security for the afterlife, we can often stop there. But Scripture’s multi-faceted picture of the cross tells us there is so much more to why Jesus died for us. Forgiveness is offered to us because God wants us to have a restored relationship with Him. In that way, it is the foundation of our relationship, but only the beginning of the relationship God wants with us. Reflect on what the Scripture says about God’s intention for us to be reconciled with Him (see John 14:27; 15:9-11; Psalm 16:11; Romans 5:3-5; Revelation 19:6-9).
    4. The wounds and hurts we carry with us in life often prevent us from experiencing the joy and peace in our hearts that God wants us to enjoy in relationship with Him. How could unhealed wounds affect people, or you personally? And why do you think it is important that we find healing for our past wounds?
    5. In his Soul Care book, Rob Reimer says: “Sadly, sometimes these hurts [from our past] are protected behind a fortress of defense mechanisms that keep us from accessing them. The fortress is not a healing refuge. The walls must come down, and we must let Jesus into our painful places, for He alone is the Healer” (p.150). What “defense mechanisms” have you seen in people (or in yourself personally) that keep us from processing our hurts with God?
    6. What can each of us do to curb our habits of avoiding facing our pain, and carve out more space and time to process them with the Lord?
    7. What did you find challenging or helpful about this Sunday’s message?