Nov 29, 2020
The Visit That Changed the World – Deric Bartlett
This week, Pastor Deric starts the series "Christmas Visits" with a message titled 'The Visit That Changed the World' based on Luke 1:26 -38
 
  1. Guess who’s coming to dinner?  v. 26-30
  2. Dining with the King: v. 29-30
  3. Motherhood and eternal life: v. 31-33
  4. Accepting the impossible by faith. V. 34-38

ICEBREAKER: Would you ever try space tourism if you had the money for it?

1. Why was it important for Luke to record that Joseph was a descendant of David [Luke 1:27]? Examine Matthew 22:41-45; Luke 2:8-14; and 2 Timothy 2:8-10 for more insights.

2. How do you understand the angel Gabriel’s greeting to Mary, “O favoured one” [Luke 1:28]? Was she a bestower of grace, or was she a recipient of grace? What is the difference [cf. John 1:16; Romans 1:5; Ephesians 1:6]?

3. What do you learn about the Baby Boy to be born to Mary from Gabriel’s description in Luke 1:31-33 [cf. Isaiah 9:6-7; Matthew 1:21; and Acts 2:29-36]?

4. The Virgin Birth announced in Luke 1:34-35 is a core teaching of Christianity. How would you explain it to a skeptical friend? Why was it necessary for Jesus to be born in this way [cf. Matthew 1:18-23; Hebrews 1:1-3; Hebrews 4:14-15; and Hebrews 7:26-28]?

5. What are the implications of Jesus bearing the title the “Son of God” [Luke 1:35]? Why is this critical to our salvation [cf. Matthew 14:33; John 1:49; and John 20:30-31]?

6. Mary’s response to the angelic announcement is exemplary [Luke 1:38]. What do you learn about her, and how does she serve as a model to believers today [cf. John 14:21; James 4:7-10; and 1 Peter 5:6-7]?

7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

“[The virgin birth] graphically shows that salvation comes “from above” and that the source of our hope and confidence lies in the living God who entered into human history in the historical figure of Jesus Christ. The virgin birth marks off the origin of Christ from the human race just as his end is marked off by the resurrection.” (Donald Bloesch)

 
 
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  • Nov 29, 2020The Visit That Changed the World – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 29, 2020
    The Visit That Changed the World – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric starts the series "Christmas Visits" with a message titled 'The Visit That Changed the World' based on Luke 1:26 -38
     
    1. Guess who’s coming to dinner?  v. 26-30
    2. Dining with the King: v. 29-30
    3. Motherhood and eternal life: v. 31-33
    4. Accepting the impossible by faith. V. 34-38

    ICEBREAKER: Would you ever try space tourism if you had the money for it?

    1. Why was it important for Luke to record that Joseph was a descendant of David [Luke 1:27]? Examine Matthew 22:41-45; Luke 2:8-14; and 2 Timothy 2:8-10 for more insights.

    2. How do you understand the angel Gabriel’s greeting to Mary, “O favoured one” [Luke 1:28]? Was she a bestower of grace, or was she a recipient of grace? What is the difference [cf. John 1:16; Romans 1:5; Ephesians 1:6]?

    3. What do you learn about the Baby Boy to be born to Mary from Gabriel’s description in Luke 1:31-33 [cf. Isaiah 9:6-7; Matthew 1:21; and Acts 2:29-36]?

    4. The Virgin Birth announced in Luke 1:34-35 is a core teaching of Christianity. How would you explain it to a skeptical friend? Why was it necessary for Jesus to be born in this way [cf. Matthew 1:18-23; Hebrews 1:1-3; Hebrews 4:14-15; and Hebrews 7:26-28]?

    5. What are the implications of Jesus bearing the title the “Son of God” [Luke 1:35]? Why is this critical to our salvation [cf. Matthew 14:33; John 1:49; and John 20:30-31]?

    6. Mary’s response to the angelic announcement is exemplary [Luke 1:38]. What do you learn about her, and how does she serve as a model to believers today [cf. John 14:21; James 4:7-10; and 1 Peter 5:6-7]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “[The virgin birth] graphically shows that salvation comes “from above” and that the source of our hope and confidence lies in the living God who entered into human history in the historical figure of Jesus Christ. The virgin birth marks off the origin of Christ from the human race just as his end is marked off by the resurrection.” (Donald Bloesch)

     
     
  • Nov 22, 2020Spiritual Farming 101 – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 22, 2020
    Spiritual Farming 101 – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Spiritual Farming 101' based on Mark 4:1-20

    1. Plant the imperishable seed  
    2. Work the invisible field of souls
    3. Reap the bounty of the abundant life


    ICEBREAKER:
    What wastes the most time in your day-to-day life?

    1. Why do you think Jesus used stories drawn from everyday life to communicate spiritual truths [Mark 4:1-9]? Why would agricultural metaphors speak powerfully to His audience? What do we learn from Jesus’ approach to help us communicate to our generation [cf. Matthew 4:18-20; John 6:35; and John 8:12]?

    2. According to Mark 4:10-12, what was the purpose of Jesus’ parables for His disciples, and then “for those outside” [cf. Matthew 11:25-27; Romans 16:25-27; and Colossians 1:24-27]?

    3. In Jesus’ parable, the sower and the seed remain consistent [Mark 4:14]. How does this impact how we go about our Christian mission in the world today [cf. Luke 1:1-4; Acts 5:17-20; and Acts 8:4]?

    4. Jesus affirmed the reality of Satan and that he aggressively opposes the work of God [Mark 4:15]. How does this affect our approach to sharing God’s Word [cf. 2 Corinthians 4:4; Ephesians 6:10-20, and 1 Peter 5:8]?

    5. Jesus listed, in Mark 4:16-19, some of the reasons people fall away from following Him. What are these reasons, and how can we address them [cf. Psalm 1:3; John 15:18-20; and 1 Timothy 6:6-10, 17-19]?

    6. The quality of the soil is the one changing factor in this parable of Jesus. How do you know God’s Word has fallen on good soil? What would that evidence look like [cf. John 15:1-11; Galatians 5:22-23; and Colossians 1:3-12]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “It is of no use for any of you to try to be soul-winners if you are not bearing fruit in your own lives. How can you serve the Lord with your lips if you do not serve Him with your lives? How can you preach His gospel with your tongues, when with hands, feet, and heart you are preaching the devil’s gospel, and setting up an antichrist by your practical unholiness?” (Charles Spurgeon)

  • Nov 15, 2020United in Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 15, 2020
    United in Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'United in Jesus' based on Mark 3:13-35.
     
    1. We share the same foundation; v. 13-21
    2. We share the same faith; v. 22-30
    3. We share the same family: v. 31-35

     

    ICEBREAKER: Who is the most intelligent or creative person you know?

    1. According to Mark 3:14-15, what were the three main responsibilities Jesus gave His apostles? How do we continue to live out these priorities today [cf. Matthew 28:18-20; Acts 4:13; and Romans 10:14-17]?

    2. What ministry principles do you learn from Jesus’ appointment of His 12 apostles [Mark 3:13-19]? Why do you think Jesus chose these specific individuals [cf. Matthew 4:18-22; John 1:35-51; and 2 Timothy 2:2]?

    3. Jesus’ family members weren’t overly supportive during His earthly ministry [Mark 3:20-21]. Why do you think they struggled to accept their elder Brother, and how does this encourage you when loved ones don’t support your Christian commitment [cf. Matthew 12:46-50; Matthew 13:53-58; and John 7:1-10]?

    4. How did Jesus counter the false allegation that He was casting out demons by Satan’s authority [Mark 3:22-27]? What does this indicate about the state of the religious leaders’ hearts [cf. Acts 19:8-9; Romans 1:21; and Ephesians 4:18]?

    5. In light of the context of Mark 3:28-30, what exactly is the “eternal sin” Jesus mentioned? How likely is it to be committed today [cf. John 12:36-43; 2 Corinthians 3:12-16; and Hebrews 3:12-19]?

    6. What do you learn about Jesus’ view of the family of God from His comments in Mark 3:31-35 [cf. Matthew 7:21; Luke 11:28, and 1 John 2:17]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Our relationship with each other is the criterion the world uses to judge whether our message is truthful - Christian community is the final apologetic.” (Francis Schaeffer)

  • Nov 8, 2020Stretch Out Your Hand to Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 8, 2020
    Stretch Out Your Hand to Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Stretch Out your Hand to Jesus' based on Mark 3:1-12.
     
    1. It was an act of faith
    2. It was an act of hope
    3. It was an act of controversy
    4. It was an act of courage

    ICEBREAKER: What is the best event you have attended? What made it so amazing?

    1.How did Jesus’ approach to the man with the withered hand differ from that of the religious leaders [Mark 3:1-5]? What does this tell you about Jesus? Consider also Psalm 37:32; Jeremiah 20:10; and Luke 20:20.

    2.How would you answer Jesus’ question in Mark 3:4? What does this indicate about the ultimate purpose of the Sabbath [cf. Exodus 20:7-11; Isaiah 58:13-14; and John 9:16]?

    3.Notice the intensity of emotion Jesus demonstrated in Mark 3:5. How does this further reveal both the full humanity and full deity of our Lord? Look up Matthew 8:23-27; John 2:13-17; and John 11:32-36 for more insights.

    4.Which was more serious: the withered hand or the hardened heart [Mark 3:3 & 5]? How can a hardened heart be softened [cf. Matthew 13:10-17; Romans 11:25-32; and Ephesians 4:17-24]?

    5.There is a stark contrast recorded between Mark 3:6 and Mark 3:7-8. The religious leaders conspired to destroy Jesus, while both Jews and Gentiles crowded Him. How do you account for these extremes [cf. Matthew 4:23; Matthew 7:28-29; and Mark 11:18]?

    6.What do you conclude about Jesus’ identity from His actions in Mark 3:7-12, as well as from the crowd and demonic reactions to Him [cf. Isaiah 61:1-3; Luke 4:40-41; and Luke 7:18-23]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “The Pharisees minded what God spoke, but not what He intended. They were busy in the outward work of the hand, but incurious of the affections and choice of the heart. So God was served in the letter, they did not much inquire into His purpose; and therefore they were curious to wash their hands, but cared not to purify their hearts.” (Jeremy Taylor)

  • Nov 1, 2020The Friend of Sinners – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 1, 2020
    The Friend of Sinners – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Friend of Sinners' based on Mark 2:1-17.
     
    Jesus targets sinners (v. 1-2)
    Jesus forgives sinners (v. 3-12)
    Jesus calls sinners (v. 13-14)
    Jesus befriends sinners (v. 15-16)
    Jesus heals sinners (v. 17)



    ICEBREAKER:
    If someone came up to you and said “Hey, do that thing you do!”, what thing would pop into your head first?

    1.Using your imagination, picture the scene of four friends letting the paralyzed man down through the roof [Mark 2:3-5]. What did Jesus commend that others in the crowd may have condemned [cf. Genesis 32:24-32; Luke 18:1-8; and Acts 14:21-22]?

    2.Why do you think Jesus first forgave the paralyzed man’s sins instead of healing him [Mark 2:5]? What was the greater need – physical or spiritual healing [cf. Psalm 51:1-4; Luke 7:40-50; and John 5:9-15]?

    3.Were the scribes in Mark 2:7 correct that only God can forgive sins? What does this indicate about who our sins directly offend? What identity claim was Jesus making in this text [cf. Psalm 32:5; Psalm 103:8-14; and John 10:22-33]?

    4.How would you answer Jesus’ question, “Which is easier, to say to the paralytic, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Rise, take up your bed and walk’? Why? Consider also John 2:11; John 11:4; and John 20:30-31 in your answer.

    5.Why do you think Jesus included Levi, a tax collector, among His 12 disciples [Mark 2:14]? How do you imagine the other disciples felt when Levi was introduced to them and they had to dine in his home with others of his profession [cf. Matthew 11:19; Matthew 21:31-32; and John 4:31-38]?

    6.Jesus clearly portrayed and conveyed His earthly mission in Mark 2:15-17. What was His mission, and how does it impact our ministry priorities [cf. Luke 15:3-7; Luke 19:10; and 1 Timothy 1:15]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Jesus was a friend of sinners not because He winked at sin, ignored sin, or enjoyed light-hearted revelry with those engaged in immorality. Jesus was a friend of sinners in that He came to save sinners and was very pleased to welcome sinners who were open to the gospel, sorry for their sins, and on their way to putting their faith in Him.” (Kevin DeYoung)

  • Oct 25, 2020Rule Breaker – Brad Lehman
    Oct 25, 2020
    Rule Breaker – Brad Lehman
    This week, Pastor Brad continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Rule Breaker' based on Mark 2:18-28.
     
    1. Feast with Jesus [Mark 2:18-22
    2. Be free in Jesus [Mark 2:23-28]
    3. Jesus is the Rule Breaker because He is the Rule Maker.

    ICEBREAKER: How did you get that scar of yours?

    1.What is the purpose of fasting, and how can it be practiced in a spiritually beneficial way [Mark 2:18]? Consider also 2 Chronicles 20:1-4; Ezra 8:21-23; Matthew 6:16-18; and Acts 13:1-3.

    2.Why is the imagery of a bridegroom so significant in the Scriptures [Mark 2:19-20]? How does it inspire hope for your future? Examine also Isaiah 54:5-6; Isaiah 62:4-5; Matthew 22:1-10; and Revelation 19:6-9.

    3.Why was the bridegroom going to be taken away from His followers [Mark 2:20]? Where was He headed [cf. Matthew 20:28; John 10:17-18; 1 Timothy 2:5-6; and 1 Peter 3:18]?

    4.There was a deliberate contrast between “new” and “old” in Jesus’ two word pictures of patching a garment and pouring wine into wineskins [Mark 2:21-22]. What do you think was Jesus’ point, and what difference does it make [cf. Galatians 4:1-7; Colossians 2:16-23; and Hebrews 10:1-4]?

    5.In Mark 2:25-26, Jesus referred to the story of David eating bread that was set aside for only the priests [1 Samuel 21:1-6]. How does this story demonstrate the intended blessing of the Sabbath [Mark 2:27]? Look at Genesis 2:1-3; Isaiah 58:6-14; and Matthew 12:9-13 for more insights.

    6.What was Jesus claiming when He referred to Himself as “lord even of the Sabbath” [Mark 2:28]? What difference does this make in the life of every disciple [cf. John 1:1-3; Colossians 1:15-17; and Hebrews 1:1-4]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “When Jesus came to earth, demons recognized him, the sick flocked to him, and sinners doused his feet and head with perfume. Meanwhile he offended pious Jews with their strict preconceptions of what God should be like. Their rejection makes me wonder, could religious types be doing just the reverse now? Could we be perpetuating an image of Jesus that fits our pious expectations but does not match the person portrayed so vividly in the Gospels?” (Philip Yancey)

     
  • Oct 18, 2020The Shining City – Deric Bartlett
    Oct 18, 2020
    The Shining City – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Deric shares a special message for our 40th anniversary titled 'The Shining City' based on Matthew 5:13-16.
    We are the salt of the earth We are the light of the world We are a city set on a hill
     
    1.Why do you think Jesus employed the metaphor of salt to describe the impact of His disciples on others [Matthew 5:13]? What is it about salt that makes it influential [cf. Job 6:6; 2 Kings 2:19-22; and Colossians 4:5-6]?
     
    2.Jesus listed the qualities of His disciples in His Beatitudes in Matthew 5:3-12. How do these shed light on how a disciple may lose saltiness [Matthew 5:13]? Consider also Ephesians 4:17-24; Hebrews 6:1-6; and 2 Peter 2:17-22.
     
    3.What is it about the properties of light that make it a fitting metaphor for Jesus’ followers [cf. Matthew 5:14]? Examine also John 8:12; Ephesians 5:7-10; and Philippians 2:14-16.
     
    4.Why would a city set atop a hill be an apt description of a follower of Jesus [Matthew 5:14]? Look up Psalm 48; Zechariah 8:1-8; and Hebrews 11:13-16 as well.
     
    5.According to Jesus, what is the role of “good works” [Matthew 5:16]? Are they necessary for salvation, or necessary as a result of salvation [cf. Ephesians 2:10; Titus 3:4-8, 14; and 1 Peter 2:11-12]?
     
    6.What does it mean to “give glory to your Father in heaven” [Matthew 5:16]? How do we ensure God receives glory [cf. Daniel 4:34-37; Matthew 9:1-8; and Revelation 4:9-11]?
     
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
     
    “Missions is not the ultimate goal of the church. Worship is. Missions exists because worship doesn’t.” (John Piper)
  • Oct 11, 2020The Lord & The Leper – Deric Bartlett
    Oct 11, 2020
    The Lord & The Leper – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Lord & The Leper' based on Mark 1:35-45.
     
    1. Prayer is a priority to Jesus: v. 35 
    2. Preaching is the passion of Jesus: v. 36-39 
    3. Restoration is the power of Jesus: v. 40-45
     
    ICEBREAKER: Do you have a regular, daily time of prayer? Is there a particular time or place that you pray? 1. Some general patterns seem to emerge regarding Jesus’ personal habits in verse 35. Also read Mark 6:46 and 14:32. What can we learn from this verse that might be beneficial to our own patterns in life? 2. What can we discover about the leper’s attitude by his posture towards Jesus in verse 40? 3. What was Jesus risking by responding to the man the way He did? What can we learn about Jesus’ nature from this encounter described in verses 40 to 41? 4. This encounter gives us a graphic illustration of Jesus’ mission on earth. Read Galatians 3:13-14 as well, and then in your own words, describe Jesus’ mission. What word would we commonly use to describe the “mission” of Jesus? 5. Jesus’ response and charge to the man in verses 43 and 44 was somewhat surprising. What was His response and why might Jesus have instructed him in this way? Why would Jesus instruct him to show himself to the priest? (Read Deuteronomy 24:8; Leviticus 14:2-4) 6. By disobeying Jesus’ instructions to “say nothing to anyone”, how did the man complicate Jesus’ plans? How do you identify with the man’s reaction and response? In what ways do we do the very same thing today? 7. What did you find particularly helpful or challenging about the message this week?
    “Life must be seen and lived in the light of God’s Word.” J.I. Packer
  • Oct 4, 2020Astonished by Jesus! – Deric Bartlett
    Oct 4, 2020
    Astonished by Jesus! – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Astonished by Jesus!' based on Mark 1:21-34.
     
    1. Astonished by His teaching (21-22,27)
    2. Astonished by His mission (v. 23-26)
    3. Astonished by His care (v. 29-31) 
    4. Astonished by His capacity (v. 32-34) 

    ICEBREAKER:

    What is your favourite food combination?

    1.Mark’s Gospel informs us that Jesus taught “as one who had authority” [Mark 1:22]. What do you think that meant, and what difference does that make to you [cf. Matthew 5:21-48; Matthew 7:28-29; and Mark 11:27-33]?

    2.What do you learn about Jesus’ identity from His encounter with the man with the unclean spirit [Mark 1:23-27]? Consult also Acts 2:22; 1 Corinthians 15:24-27; and Colossians 2:15.

    3.Jesus frequently confronted the demonic world during His earthly ministry [Mark 1:23-27]. Christians can be guilty of fascination, fear, or failing to take demons seriously. What is a biblically balanced approach to the demonic world? Consider also 2 Corinthians 11:13-15; Ephesians 6:10-20; and Revelation 20:1-10.

    4.What do you observe about the early disciples’ lives from Mark 1:29-31 that demonstrates how ordinary they were [cf. Luke 5:10; John 1:40-42; and 1 Corinthians 9:5]?

    5.Why do you think Jesus prohibited the unclean spirits from speaking about Him [Mark 1:34]? Examine Matthew 8:29; Luke 4:33-36; and Luke 4:41 for more insights.

    6.What was the purpose of Jesus’ healing ministry [Mark 1:34]? What did it indicate about His identity and mission [cf. Isaiah 53:4-5; Isaiah 61:1-3; and Matthew 8:1-4]?

    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “(Jesus’) authority on earth allows us to dare to go to all the nations. His authority in heaven gives us our only hope of success. And His presence with us leaves us no other choice.” (John Stott)

  • Sep 27, 2020The Kingdom has Come! – Deric Bartlett
    Sep 27, 2020
    The Kingdom has Come! – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the  series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Kingdom has Come!' based on Mark 1:9-20.

    1. Heaven is open (v. 9-11)
    2. Hell is doomed (v. 12-13)
    3. The kingdom of God is among us (v. 14-15) 
    4. God's net is cast (v. 16-20)

    ICEBREAKER:

    What is the most amazing natural occurrence you have witnessed?

    1. What do you learn about Jesus’ identity and mission from His baptism in Mark 1:9-11? Consult also Isaiah 42:1-4; Matthew 3:13-17; and John 1:32-34.

    2. What do you think was the purpose of Jesus’ wilderness temptation experience, and what did it reveal about Him [Mark 1:12-13]? Consider also Deuteronomy 8:1-6; Matthew 4:1-11; and Luke 4:1-13.

    3. As Mark 1 unfolds, notice the subtle ominous mood, with the driving of Jesus into the wilderness to be tempted by Satan, the wild animals, and then John’s arrest. What message was being conveyed to the early persecuted Christians reading this book [cf. 2 Timothy 3:12; Hebrews 2:18; Hebrews 4:15; and Revelation 2:13]?

    4. According to Mark 1:14-15, what is the content of the gospel, and what must be the response to it [cf. Luke 24:46-49; Acts 20:21; and 1 Corinthians 15:1-11]?

    5. As Jesus began to call his first followers, what principles of discipleship do you observe in Mark 1:17? How do these impact how you are following Jesus today [cf. Matthew 10:24-25; Luke 14:26-27; and John 1:35-51]?

    6. Following Jesus meant leaving other things behind [Mark 1:18-20]. What might you need to leave behind in order to fully follow Jesus [cf. Mark 10:28-31; Luke 9:23-27; and Ephesians 5:6-21]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “One way to define spiritual life is getting so tired and fed up with yourself you go on to something better, which is following Jesus.” (Eugene H. Peterson)




  • Sep 20, 2020HOPE From Heaven – Deric Bartlett
    Sep 20, 2020
    HOPE From Heaven – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the new series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'HOPE From Heaven' based on Mark 1:1-8.
     
    1. Hope from heaven is delivered in person (v. 1)
    2. Hope from heaven is written in prophecy (v. 2-3)
    3. Hope from heaven was announced by a prophet (v. 4-7) 
    4. Hope from heaven is accompanied by Divine power (v. 8)

    ICEBREAKER:

    Where is your favourite place to nap?

    1. What difference does it make to you that Jesus is the Son of God [Mark 1:1]? Consult Matthew 14:33; Mark 5:7; Luke 1:35; and John 20:31 for more insights.

    2. Malachi and Isaiah prophesied of a messenger preparing the way for Messiah’s first coming [Mark 1:2-3]. We are awaiting Messiah’s second coming. How do we best prepare ourselves [cf. Joel 2:12-13; Luke 1:17; and 1 John 3:2-3]?

    3. What is the significance of “the wilderness” in Old Testament Jewish thinking [Mark 1:4]? What role does the wilderness play in God’s dealings with people [cf. Exodus 3:18; Numbers 14:22-35; and Deuteronomy 8:2-5]?

    4. What is repentance, and why is it essential to the forgiveness of sins [Mark 1:4]? Consider also Luke 24:47; Acts 2:38; Acts 3:19; and Acts 26:18.

    5. Why are John the Baptist’s clothing, diet, and words recorded in the text [Mark 1:6-8], and how do these contrast with the religious leaders of his day [cf. Matthew 6:1; Matthew 6:5; and Matthew 23:5-7]? What do these details reveal about John’s character that is worthy of emulation?

    6. What are the results of Jesus baptising people in the Holy Spirit [Mark 1:8]? Examine also Acts 1:8; Acts 5:32, and 1 Corinthians 12:13.

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “The Christian Gospel is that I am so flawed that Jesus had to die for me, yet I am so loved and valued that Jesus was glad to die for me. This leads to deep humility and deep confidence at the same time. It undermines both swaggering and sniveling. I cannot feel superior to anyone, and yet I have nothing to prove to anyone. I do not think more of myself or less of myself. Instead, I think of myself less.” (Tim Keller)

  • Sep 13, 2020Introduction to the Gospel of Mark – Deric Bartlett
    Sep 13, 2020
    Introduction to the Gospel of Mark – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric start the new series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with an introduction to the book of Mark.
     
    THREE reasons to study the Gospel of Mark  
    1. The theme: “The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God”
    2. The author is human: John Mark 
    3. The context is relevant: “pamphlet for hard times”
    FOUR facts about Jesus in the Gospel of Mark 
    1. Jesus was a man
    2. Jesus was a preacher man
    3. Jesus was a busy man
    4. Jesus was a focused man
    THREE takeaways from the Gospel of Mark  
    1. The important place that people have in the kingdom of God 
    2. The central place that humility has in the kingdom of God
    3. The vital place that the Gospel has in the kingdom of God
     
    ICEBREAKER: What do you buy way more of than most people? 1. According to your understanding, what is the gospel [Mark 1:1], and why is it directly related to the Person of Jesus Christ [cf. Romans 1:16-17; 1 Corinthians 15:1-8; and 2 Timothy 1:8-12]? 2. The Gospel of Mark makes no reference to Jesus’ lineage but begins with quotes from Malachi 3:1 and Isaiah 40:3 about the coming of Messiah’s forerunner. What was a forerunner’s purpose, and how can believers carry on a similar ministry today [cf. Colossians 4:5-6; 2 Timothy 2:24-26; and 1 Peter 3:13-16]? 3. Mark presents Jesus as a man of action and power. Why do you think that would appeal to a Roman audience at the height of the Roman Empire? Consult Mark 2:1-12; Mark 4:35-41; and Mark 5:1-20 for more insights 4. Mark 8:27-30 is strategic in Mark’s Gospel as Peter confesses Jesus as the Christ. From that moment, Jesus begins to foretell His suffering and death [Mark 8:31]. Why was Christ’s suffering necessary [cf. Philippians 3:10-11; Colossians 1:24; 1 Peter 1:10-11; and 1 Peter 4:12-13]? 5. The crowds and Jesus’ disciples had their own particular ideas of what the Messiah’s mission should be and how it should be accomplished. Jesus had a radically different idea as expressed in a key verse – Mark 10:45. How does this verse shape your view of ministry for Christ’s sake [cf. John 13:12-17; Galatians 5:13; and 1 Peter 4:10]? 6. Mark’s Gospel was likely addressed to suffering Christians. How would Christ’s example, as God’s Suffering Servant, be of great comfort and challenge to persecuted believers? Consider also Acts 14:22; Philippians 1:27-30; and 2 Timothy 3:12. 7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message? “Jesus lost all his glory so that we could be clothed in it. He was shut out so we could get access. He was bound, nailed, so that we could be free. He was cast out so we could approach. And Jesus took away the only kind of suffering that can really destroy you: that is being cast away from God. He took that so that now all suffering that comes into your life will only make you great. A lump of coal under pressure becomes a diamond. And the suffering of a person in Christ only turns you into somebody gorgeous.” (Tim Keller)
  • Sep 6, 2020Resetting Your Focus on Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    Sep 6, 2020
    Resetting Your Focus on Jesus – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Reset 2020
    This week, Pastor Deric concludes the series 'Reset' with a message titled 'Resetting Your Focus on Jesus' from Revelation 1:9-20
     
    John was “in the Spirit” (v. 10) John “heard a loud voice” (v. 10,12,15) John “turned to see” (v. 12) John “saw the son of man” (v. 12-16) John “fell at His feet” (v. 17-18)
     
    ICEBREAKER:
    In your opinion, when was the most interesting period in history?
     
    1. According to the Apostle John, what are the expected costs involved with following Jesus faithfully [Revelation 1:9]? Consider also Matthew 10:34-39; Luke 9:23-26; and 2 Timothy 3:12.
     
    2. What life-altering event occurred on “the Lord’s Day” [Revelation 1:10] that is commemorated every Sunday? Why is it so important to never overlook or disregard this special day? What does that day mean to you [cf. Luke 24:1; John 20:1, 19; and Acts 20:7]?
     
    3. What is the relationship between the voice of God and the written Word of God [cf. Revelation 1:10-11]? How signifi cant is that relationship [cf. Psalm 19:7-11; 2 Timothy 3:16; and 2 Peter 1:20-21]?
     
    4. John wrote one book to seven churches [Revelation 1:11]. What does this teach us about the need to specifi cally apply the Word of God to our particular time and our cultural context of Mississauga [cf. Jeremiah 29:7; Luke 10:13-15; and Luke 13:34-35]?
     
    5. The One who spoke to John in a loud voice appeared “like a son of man” [Revelation 1:13]. Who was this, and what is the signifi cance of this title? Consult also Daniel 7:13-14; Matthew 9:6; and Matthew 25:31.
     
    6. The Apostle John arguably enjoyed the closest relationship with Jesus during His earthly ministry [cf. John 13:23-25]. Yet, when John saw Jesus in this vision, he is completely overcome [Revelation 1:17]. What do these differing views of Jesus tell you about His identity [cf. Isaiah 6:5-7; Luke 5:5-11; and Revelation 22:12-13]?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “On Christ’s glory I would fi x all my thoughts and desires, and the more I see of the glory of Christ, the more the painted beauties of this world will wither in my eyes and I will be more and more crucifi ed to this world. It will become to me like something dead and putrid, impossible for me to enjoy.” (John Owen)
  • Aug 30, 2020Resetting Your TROUBLED Heart – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 30, 2020
    Resetting Your TROUBLED Heart – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Reset 2020
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'Reset' with a message titled 'Resetting Your Troubled Heart', based on John 14.
    TURMOIL & ANXIETY are a universal human EXPERIENCE RELATIONSHIP is the universal human NEED BELONGING is a universal human LONGING ASSURANCE AND HOPE are a universal GIFT
    ICEBREAKER:
     
    What kind of challenges are you facing these days?
     
    1. According to John 13:31-38, what were some of the reasons for the disciples’ troubled hearts [John 14:1]? What lay ahead that would be even more troubling? What is troubling your heart today that Jesus is able to calm [cf. Psalm 42:5; John 14:27; and John 16:22]?
     
    2. What remedy did Jesus prescribe to His disciples for their troubled hearts that is just as effective for us today [John 14:1]? How are you practicing this? Consider also Isaiah 26:3; Isaiah 43:1-3; and John 16:33.
     
    3. Since the disciples were troubled in heart in their present circumstances, Jesus reassured them with their future destiny [John 14:2]. How is Jesus’ promise of preparing a place for believers in the Father’s house reassuring you today [cf. Psalm 23:6; 2 Corinthians 5:1; and Hebrews 11:16]?
     
    4. How are you using the promised return of Christ [John 14:3] to quell the fear, anxiety, and confusion that is raging in our present world [cf. Acts 1:11; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18; and Titus 2:11-14]?
     
    5. Based on Jesus’ declaration in John 14:6 that He is the only way to the Father, how would you counter the false idea that all religious beliefs lead to God [cf. John 1:14; John 11:25; and Acts 4:12]?
     
    6. Jesus made the astonishing claim that to see Him was to see the Father [John 14:7-11]. How do you know He was telling the truth? What do Jesus’ life and teachings reveal about the Father? Consult Isaiah 9:6-7; Colossians 1:15-20; and Hebrews 1:1-3 as well.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Down through the centuries in times of trouble and trial God has brought courage to the hearts of those who love Him. The Bible is filled with assurances of God’s help and comfort in every kind of trouble which might cause fears to arise in the human heart. You can look ahead with promise, hope, and joy.” (Billy Graham)
  • Aug 23, 2020RESET:Worship – Part 2 – Max Oates
    Aug 23, 2020
    RESET:Worship – Part 2 – Max Oates
    Series: Reset 2020
    This week, Pastor Max shares Part 2 of his message 'RESET: Worship', based on Acts 2:42-47

    1. The Church Needs to Stand Out (v. 42-43)

    2. The Church Needs to Do Life Together (v. 44-46)

    3. The Church Needs to Reach the Lost (v. 47)

    ICEBREAKER:

    Do you think you have a pretty good work-life balance? Why or why not?

    1. The term translated “devoting” [Acts 2:42] contains the ideas of continually holding to, persisting in, and persevering in the apostles’ teaching. What does this look like today? What are you currently doing to devote yourself to sound teaching [cf. Ezra 7:10; Matthew 7:24-27; and Acts 17:11]?

    2. The early Christians’ key activities are recorded in Acts 2:42. What are modern parallels to these spiritual practices that you can participate in at CCBC [cf. Acts 1:14; Acts 20:7; and Hebrews 10:24-25]?

    3. It is noteworthy that when the early believers lived out their beliefs, awe and miracles followed. How can today’s church recapture the infl uence and impact of the early church [cf. Matthew 5:13-16; Ephesians 5:8-10; Philippians 2:14-16; and 1 Peter 2:11-12]?

    4. Does Acts 2:44-45 indicate the early Christians believed and behaved as “socialists”? Why or why not [cf. Luke 18:22; Acts 4:32-37; and Acts 6:1-6]?

    5. What do you learn about hospitality and true Christian fellowship from Acts 4:46 that can be put into action today [cf. Acts 16:32-34; Romans 12:9-13; and 1 Peter 4:9]?

    6. When the early church focused on its spiritual priorities, something amazing happened. What did the Lord do that shows us how to go on mission today [cf. John 15:4-5; Acts 6:7; and 2 Peter 3:18]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Without doubt the emphasis in Christian teaching today should be on worship. There is little danger that we shall become merely worshipers and neglect the practical implications of the gospel. No one can long worship God in spirit and in truth before the obligation to holy service becomes too strong to resist. Fellowship with God leads straight to obedience and good works. That is the divine order and it can never be reversed.” (A.W. Tozer)