Mar 29, 2020
A Family Chat about Hardship – Deric Bartlett

This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message called 'A Family chat about Hardship', based on Hebrews 12:5-17.

QUESTIONS

ICEBREAKER: Who is the most interesting person you’ve met and talked with? Why?

1. How does the practice of reflecting on Jesus’ endurance [Hebrews 12:3] help you persevere [cf. Mark 15:15-24; Galatians 6:9; and 1 Peter 2:21-24]?
 
2. Is Jesus worth the sacrifice of your life [Hebrews 12:4]? Why or why not [cf. Mark 8:34-38; Acts 7:54-60; Romans 12:1; and Revelation 6:9-11]?
 
3. Why do so many avoid discipline? Why does God include it in our development as disciples [Hebrews 12:5-6]? Consult Deuteronomy 8:2-5; 1 Corinthians 11:27-32; and Revelation 3:19 for more insights.
 
4. According to Hebrews 12:7-8, what does God’s discipline indicate about our status? What is its purpose? How do these verses also apply to parenting [cf. Proverbs 19:18; Proverbs 29:15, 17; and Ephesians 6:4]?
 
5. Recall a time during your upbringing when you were legitimately disciplined. What did you learn from that experience that has helped shaped you into a mature person? How does this relate to the point of Hebrews 12:9-10 [cf. Genesis 18:19; Deuteronomy 6:4-9; 1 Samuel 2:22-25, 29, 3:11-13; Proverbs 22:6]?
6. What are the long-term benefits to being trained through discipline [Hebrews 12:11]? Meditate on 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; 1 Timothy 4:7-8; and 1 Peter 1:6-9 for further ideas.
7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
“He remembers our frame and knows that we are dust. He may sometimes chasten us, it is true, but even this He does with a smile, the proud, tender
smile of a Father who is bursting with pleasure over an imperfect but promising son who is coming every day to look more and more like the One whose child he is.” (A.W. Tozer)
WatchNotesDownloadDateTitle
  • Mar 29, 2020A Family Chat about Hardship – Deric Bartlett
    Mar 29, 2020
    A Family Chat about Hardship – Deric Bartlett

    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message called 'A Family chat about Hardship', based on Hebrews 12:5-17.

    QUESTIONS

    ICEBREAKER: Who is the most interesting person you’ve met and talked with? Why?

    1. How does the practice of reflecting on Jesus’ endurance [Hebrews 12:3] help you persevere [cf. Mark 15:15-24; Galatians 6:9; and 1 Peter 2:21-24]?
     
    2. Is Jesus worth the sacrifice of your life [Hebrews 12:4]? Why or why not [cf. Mark 8:34-38; Acts 7:54-60; Romans 12:1; and Revelation 6:9-11]?
     
    3. Why do so many avoid discipline? Why does God include it in our development as disciples [Hebrews 12:5-6]? Consult Deuteronomy 8:2-5; 1 Corinthians 11:27-32; and Revelation 3:19 for more insights.
     
    4. According to Hebrews 12:7-8, what does God’s discipline indicate about our status? What is its purpose? How do these verses also apply to parenting [cf. Proverbs 19:18; Proverbs 29:15, 17; and Ephesians 6:4]?
     
    5. Recall a time during your upbringing when you were legitimately disciplined. What did you learn from that experience that has helped shaped you into a mature person? How does this relate to the point of Hebrews 12:9-10 [cf. Genesis 18:19; Deuteronomy 6:4-9; 1 Samuel 2:22-25, 29, 3:11-13; Proverbs 22:6]?
    6. What are the long-term benefits to being trained through discipline [Hebrews 12:11]? Meditate on 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; 1 Timothy 4:7-8; and 1 Peter 1:6-9 for further ideas.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
    “He remembers our frame and knows that we are dust. He may sometimes chasten us, it is true, but even this He does with a smile, the proud, tender
    smile of a Father who is bursting with pleasure over an imperfect but promising son who is coming every day to look more and more like the One whose child he is.” (A.W. Tozer)
  • Mar 29, 2020A Family Chat about Hardship – Deric Bartlett
    Mar 29, 2020
    A Family Chat about Hardship – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message called 'A Family chat about Hardship', based on Hebrews 12:5-17.

    QUESTIONS

    ICEBREAKER: Who is the most interesting person you’ve met and talked with? Why?

    1. How does the practice of reflecting on Jesus’ endurance [Hebrews 12:3] help you persevere [cf. Mark 15:15-24; Galatians 6:9; and 1 Peter 2:21-24]?
     
    2. Is Jesus worth the sacrifice of your life [Hebrews 12:4]? Why or why not [cf. Mark 8:34-38; Acts 7:54-60; Romans 12:1; and Revelation 6:9-11]?
     
    3. Why do so many avoid discipline? Why does God include it in our development as disciples [Hebrews 12:5-6]? Consult Deuteronomy 8:2-5; 1 Corinthians 11:27-32; and Revelation 3:19 for more insights.
     
    4. According to Hebrews 12:7-8, what does God’s discipline indicate about our status? What is its purpose? How do these verses also apply to parenting [cf. Proverbs 19:18; Proverbs 29:15, 17; and Ephesians 6:4]?
     
    5. Recall a time during your upbringing when you were legitimately disciplined. What did you learn from that experience that has helped shaped you into a mature person? How does this relate to the point of Hebrews 12:9-10 [cf. Genesis 18:19; Deuteronomy 6:4-9; 1 Samuel 2:22-25, 29, 3:11-13; Proverbs 22:6]?

    6. What are the long-term benefits to being trained through discipline [Hebrews 12:11]? Meditate on 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; 1 Timothy 4:7-8; and 1 Peter 1:6-9 for further ideas.

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “He remembers our frame and knows that we are dust. He may sometimes chasten us, it is true, but even this He does with a smile, the proud, tender
    smile of a Father who is bursting with pleasure over an imperfect but promising son who is coming every day to look more and more like the One whose child he is.” (A.W. Tozer)
  • Mar 22, 2020The Cloud of Encouragers – Deric Bartlett
    Mar 22, 2020
    The Cloud of Encouragers – Deric Bartlett

    This week Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message called 'The Cloud of Encouragers' based on Hebrews 12:1-4.

    CHILDREN’S MINISTRIES
    GIVING
    We know that you are concerned about giving your tithes and offerings during the COVID-19 measures. You can always donate through the Give page on our website:
    It’s also an option to simply set aside your gift until you can give in person. We thank you for your faithfulness!

    CONNECT WITH OUR PASTORAL TEAM
    We’re committed to living in community and being “the church” even during this present situation. Our Staff is ready to connect with you and continue to offer teaching, encouragement and care. You can connect with us here.
  • Mar 15, 2020Do Not Be Anxious – Deric Bartlett
    Mar 15, 2020
    Do Not Be Anxious – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Deric shares a message called 'Do not be Anxious' based on Psalm 28:& and Philippians 4:6.
    The video link the entire service which was live-streamed as we monitor the Coronavirus situation. This audio is the sermon only.

    CHILDREN’S MINISTRIES

    Kingdom Kid's Sunday Lesson - Click Here


    GIVING 
    We know that you are concerned about giving your tithes and offerings during the COVID-19 measures. You can always donate through the Give page on our website.. In addition, perhaps now is a good time to consider switching to a regular automatic Electronic Funds Transfer. It’s also an option to simply set aside your gift until you can give in person. We thank you for your faithfulness!

    CONNECT WITH OUR PASTORAL TEAM
    We’re committed to living in community and being “the church” even during this present situation. Our Staff is ready to connect with you and continue to offer teaching, encouragement and care. You can connect with us here.
  • Mar 8, 2020Cornering A Con – Brad Lehman
    Mar 8, 2020
    Cornering A Con – Brad Lehman
    This week, Pastor Brad shares a message called 'Cornering A con', based on the book of Philemon.
     
    1. The witnesses of a con: Find faithful accomplices [Philemon 1:1-3].
    2. The victim of a con: Respond to victimization by refreshing others [Philemon 1:4-7].
    3. The cornering of a con: Let God corner the useless to convert them to useful [Philemon 1:8-16].
    4. Climbing into a con’s corner: Identify with the guilty [Philemon 1:17-22].
    5. Greetings from more accomplices: Praise God for His grace [Philemon 1:23-25]. Let Jesus climb into your corner.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What do you wish someone taught you a long time ago?
     
    1. What prayer principles do you pick up from Paul’s prayer in Philemon 1:4-7? Compare with other Scriptures such as 1 Corinthians 1:4-9; Ephesians 1:15-19; and 1 Thessalonians 1:2-5.
     
    2. How does a believer refresh “the hearts of the saints” [Philemon 1:7, 20]? What would that look like? Consult also Matthew 11:28-30; 1 Corinthians 16:15-18; and 2 Corinthians 7:13-16 for further insights.
     
    3. Paul wrote that he had become the “father” of Onesimus during his imprisonment [Philemon 1:10]. What does this show about their spiritual relationship? What impact does the analogy of a “father” have for those who serve in Christ’s church [cf. Acts 20:25-35; 1 Corinthians 4:14-21; and 1 Thessalonians 2:9-12]?
     
    4. Have you ever felt or been called “useless” [Philemon 1:11]? Who or what prompted this reaction? How does the good news of Christ restore one to “usefulness” [cf. Luke 19:1-10; 1 Timothy 1:12-16; and 2 Timothy 2:20-21]?
     
    5. The world focuses on status symbols, titles, power, fame and wealth. In contrast, Christ’s gospel elevates all who trust Him to His beloved family members [Philemon 1:15-17]. How does this changed perspective influence how you treat each member of your church family [cf. Ephesians 6:5-9; Colossians 3:22-24; and 1 Timothy 6:1-2]?
     
    6. How does Paul’s language in Philemon 1:17-19 echo that of the gospel? How does Paul’s advocacy on Onesimus’ behalf imitate Christ for us? How can we do this for others? Consider Luke 15:1-7; Acts 9:26-30; and Romans 15:7 for more ideas.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Wherever Jesus has been proclaimed, we see lives change for the good, nations change for the better, thieves become honest, alcoholics become sober, hateful individuals become channels of love, unjust persons embrace justice.” (Josh McDowell)
  • Mar 8, 2020Cornering A Con – Brad Lehman
    Mar 8, 2020
    Cornering A Con – Brad Lehman
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Brad shares a message called 'Cornering A con', based on the book of Philemon.
     
    1. The witnesses of a con: Find faithful accomplices [Philemon 1:1-3].
    2. The victim of a con: Respond to victimization by refreshing others [Philemon 1:4-7].
    3. The cornering of a con: Let God corner the useless to convert them to useful [Philemon 1:8-16].
    4. Climbing into a con’s corner: Identify with the guilty [Philemon 1:17-22].
    5. Greetings from more accomplices: Praise God for His grace [Philemon 1:23-25]. Let Jesus climb into your corner.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What do you wish someone taught you a long time ago?
     
    1. What prayer principles do you pick up from Paul’s prayer in Philemon 1:4-7? Compare with other Scriptures such as 1 Corinthians 1:4-9; Ephesians 1:15-19; and 1 Thessalonians 1:2-5.
     
    2. How does a believer refresh “the hearts of the saints” [Philemon 1:7, 20]? What would that look like? Consult also Matthew 11:28-30; 1 Corinthians 16:15-18; and 2 Corinthians 7:13-16 for further insights.
     
    3. Paul wrote that he had become the “father” of Onesimus during his imprisonment [Philemon 1:10]. What does this show about their spiritual relationship? What impact does the analogy of a “father” have for those who serve in Christ’s church [cf. Acts 20:25-35; 1 Corinthians 4:14-21; and 1 Thessalonians 2:9-12]?
     
    4. Have you ever felt or been called “useless” [Philemon 1:11]? Who or what prompted this reaction? How does the good news of Christ restore one to “usefulness” [cf. Luke 19:1-10; 1 Timothy 1:12-16; and 2 Timothy 2:20-21]?
     
    5. The world focuses on status symbols, titles, power, fame and wealth. In contrast, Christ’s gospel elevates all who trust Him to His beloved family members [Philemon 1:15-17]. How does this changed perspective influence how you treat each member of your church family [cf. Ephesians 6:5-9; Colossians 3:22-24; and 1 Timothy 6:1-2]?
     
    6. How does Paul’s language in Philemon 1:17-19 echo that of the gospel? How does Paul’s advocacy on Onesimus’ behalf imitate Christ for us? How can we do this for others? Consider Luke 15:1-7; Acts 9:26-30; and Romans 15:7 for more ideas.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Wherever Jesus has been proclaimed, we see lives change for the good, nations change for the better, thieves become honest, alcoholics become sober, hateful individuals become channels of love, unjust persons embrace justice.” (Josh McDowell)
  • Mar 1, 2020What’s Suffering Good For? – Darryl Dash
    Mar 1, 2020
    What’s Suffering Good For? – Darryl Dash
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Darryl Dash from Liberty Grace Church shares with us. 'What's Suffering Good For?' is based on 2 Corinthians 1:1-11.
     
    God is a compassionate, encouraging God.
    The suffering we face is purposeful.
    Suffering builds community.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What has really taken a toll on you?
     
    1. Paul discussed affliction and suffering in 2 Corinthians 1:1-11. Yet he began by blessing God [11:3]. What role does worship play in helping us navigate life’s trials [cf. Luke 1:68-75; Ephesians 1:3-6; and 1 Peter 1:3-9]?
     
    2. What does it mean that God is the God of all comfort [2 Corinthians 1:3-4]? How does this encourage you? Consult also Isaiah 40:1-2; Isaiah 60:1-3; 2 Thessalonians 2:16-17.
     
    3. How does our suffering prepare us to help others [2 Corinthians 1:4-6]? Consider also Philippians 3:10-11; Colossians 1:24; and 1 Peter 4:12-14.
     
    4. How does our suffering help to deepen community [2 Corinthians 1:7-11]? Look up Acts 9:15-16; Romans 8:16-17; and 1 Peter 5:8-10 for further insights.
     
    5. Paul was honest about his suffering [2 Corinthians 1:8-9]. Why do we sometimes believe that followers of Jesus shouldn’t suffer or despair [cf. Isaiah 53:3-6; Romans 5:3-5; and 2 Timothy 3:10-12]?
     
    6. What is the place of prayer in suffering [2 Corinthians 1:11]? How have you experienced comfort through the prayers of others? Examine Acts 12:3-17; Philippians 1:19, and Ephesians 6:18-20 for more encouragement.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “I am not a theologian or a scholar, but I am very aware of the fact that pain is necessary to all of us. In my own life, I think I can honestly say that out of the deepest pain has come the strongest conviction of the presence of God and the love of God.” (Elisabeth Elliot)
  • Mar 1, 2020What’s Suffering Good For? – Darryl Dash
    Mar 1, 2020
    What’s Suffering Good For? – Darryl Dash
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Darryl Dash from Liberty Grace Church shares with us. 'What's Suffering Good For?' is based on 2 Corinthians 1:1-11.
     
    God is a compassionate, encouraging God.
    The suffering we face is purposeful.
    Suffering builds community.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What has really taken a toll on you?
     
    1. Paul discussed affliction and suffering in 2 Corinthians 1:1-11. Yet he began by blessing God [11:3]. What role does worship play in helping us navigate life’s trials [cf. Luke 1:68-75; Ephesians 1:3-6; and 1 Peter 1:3-9]?
     
    2. What does it mean that God is the God of all comfort [2 Corinthians 1:3-4]? How does this encourage you? Consult also Isaiah 40:1-2; Isaiah 60:1-3; 2 Thessalonians 2:16-17.
     
    3. How does our suffering prepare us to help others [2 Corinthians 1:4-6]? Consider also Philippians 3:10-11; Colossians 1:24; and 1 Peter 4:12-14.
     
    4. How does our suffering help to deepen community [2 Corinthians 1:7-11]? Look up Acts 9:15-16; Romans 8:16-17; and 1 Peter 5:8-10 for further insights.
     
    5. Paul was honest about his suffering [2 Corinthians 1:8-9]. Why do we sometimes believe that followers of Jesus shouldn’t suffer or despair [cf. Isaiah 53:3-6; Romans 5:3-5; and 2 Timothy 3:10-12]?
     
    6. What is the place of prayer in suffering [2 Corinthians 1:11]? How have you experienced comfort through the prayers of others? Examine Acts 12:3-17; Philippians 1:19, and Ephesians 6:18-20 for more encouragement.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “I am not a theologian or a scholar, but I am very aware of the fact that pain is necessary to all of us. In my own life, I think I can honestly say that out of the deepest pain has come the strongest conviction of the presence of God and the love of God.” (Elisabeth Elliot)
  • Feb 23, 2020By Faith – Deric Bartlett
    Feb 23, 2020
    By Faith – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message called 'By Faith' From Hebrews 11.

    1. The assurance of faith
    2. The people of faith
    3. The exploits of faith
    4. The patience of faith
    5. The cost of faith
    6. The ancestry of faith
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: If you could start a charity, what would it be for?
     
    1. How does Hebrews 11:1-3 clarify what faith is [11:1], how faith is rewarded [11:2], and how faith affects our view of life’s origins [11:3]? What difference do various views of life’s ultimate origins make on a person’s perspective on life [cf. Genesis 1:1; Romans 1:20; and Colossians 1:16-17]?
     
    2. Hebrews 11:6 is a key verse in this chapter. How necessary is faith, who is the focus of our faith, and what results from faith [cf. Psalm 19:1-6; John 14:1; Acts 17:24-28]?
     
    3. Examine the stories of Abel [Genesis 4:1-8], Enoch [Genesis 5:21-24], and Noah [Genesis 6:8-22]. What did each do to demonstrate his faith? What resulted from their faith that encourages us to live similarly?
     
    4. Hebrews 11:8-12 recounts the faith of Abraham and Sarah [Genesis 15; 18:1-19; 21:1-8]. What was their faith based on [cf. Romans 4:13-18], how did they show their faith, and how was their faith ultimately rewarded?
     
    5. The author of Hebrews observed in Hebrews 11:13-16 that the patriarchs never saw the fulfillment of God’s promise. Yet, they still looked forward and remained faithful. How does this help you persevere in your faith journey [cf. John 8:56; Philippians 3:20-21; 1 Peter 2:11; and Revelation 21]?
     
    6. Hebrews 11:17-19 recounts Abraham’s sacrifice of his promised son [cf. Genesis 22:1-19]. What do you learn about faith from this story [cf. James 2:21; James 5:10-11; and 1 Peter 1:6-7]? What do you learn about who God is and what He can do?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Faith never knows where it is being led, but it loves and knows the One who is leading.” (Oswald Chambers)
  • Feb 16, 2020Draw Near to God – Deric Bartlett
    Feb 16, 2020
    Draw Near to God – Deric Bartlett

    This week Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message called 'Draw Near to God' from Hebrews 10.

    Draw near to God through Jesus. v. 1-12

    Draw near to God by the Word of God. v. 14-18
    Draw near to Godin community.v. 24-25
    Draw near to Godin suffering.v. 32-35
    Draw near to God by faith.v. 36-38
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What’s the best thing you’ve got going on in your life at the moment?
     
    1. Compare and contrast Christ’s sacrifice of Himself for us to the Old Testament sacrificial system [Hebrews 10:1-13]. Why is trusting in Jesus’ sacrifice a superior option than trusting in religious rituals? Consult also Romans 8:3-4; 1 Peter 2:24; and 1 Peter 3:18.
     
    2. What did Christ’s sacrifice accomplish for all who believe in Him [Hebrews 10:14-18]? Examine also Matthew 26:28; Luke 24:46-49; and Colossians 1:13-14.
     
    3. According to Hebrews 10:19-23, why are we now able to confidently draw near to God, and how are we to do so? Look up 1 Corinthians 6:9-11; Ephesians 2:11-22; and Titus 3:4-7 for further insights.
     
    4. What are believers responsible to do for one another to help “hold fast” our confession of Christ [Hebrews 10:23-25]? How can we practice this in our church family [cf. Acts 2:42; 1 Corinthians 15:1-2; Colossians 3:16; and 1 Thessalonians 5:21-22]?
     
    5. The author of Hebrews warned of the fearful danger of turning away from following Christ [Hebrews 10:26-31]. What are the warning signs, and what will result for those who fall away [cf. Numbers 15:30-31; 2 Peter 2:20-22; and 1 John 2:15-17]?
     
    6. Following the warning, the writer of Hebrews offered his readers encouragement [Hebrews 10:32-39]. What evidence gave him hope that they would persevere [cf. Matthew 10:22; Luke 8:15; and James 1:12]?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Christ is our best friend, and ere long will be our only friend. I pray God with all my heart that I may be weary of everything else but converse and communion with Him.” (John Owen)
  • Feb 10, 2020The GREATEST Reformation – Deric Bartlett
    Feb 10, 2020
    The GREATEST Reformation – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message titled 'The GREATEST Reformation' based on Hebrews 9.
     
    1. God went to great lengths to prepare the world for His reformation. v. 1-10
    2. The greatest reformation took place at the cross. v. 10-14, 22
    3. Jesus makes it possible for us to dwell in the presence of God. v. 24
    4. God’s great reformation includes the second appearing of Jesus Christ. v. 27-28
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What topic could you give a 20-minute presentation on without any preparation?
     
    1. The writer of Hebrews cut short his discussion of the details of the Old Testament tabernacle [Hebrews 9:5]. As you reflect on the details listed in Hebrews 9:1-5, what was the significance of the tabernacle along with the items within it [cf. Exodus 16:32-34; Exodus 25:8-9; Exodus 26:33; Numbers 17:10; and Deuteronomy 4:13-14]?
     
    2. According to Hebrews 9:6-10, what were the limitations of the Old Testament sacrificial system [cf. 1 Samuel 15:22-23; Psalm 51:16-19; and Mark 12:32-33]? Why does the author call the end of the sacrificial system “the time of reformation” [Hebrews 9:10]?
     
    3. Hebrews 9:13-14 argues from the lesser to the greater. What did Christ accomplish once for all, according to Hebrews 9:11-14, that clearly demonstrated His superiority over the Old Testament sacrificial system [cf. Ephesians 2:13-18; 1 Peter 1:17-19; and 1 John 1:7]?
     
    4. Why does humanity require a Mediator [Hebrews 9:15], and what are the results of His efforts on our behalf [cf. Galatians 3:19-20; 1 Timothy 2:5-6; Hebrews 12:22-24]?
     
    5. Hebrews 9:19-22 tells us that without blood, there is no forgiveness of sins. Why is blood necessary for forgiveness [cf. Leviticus 17:10-11; Romans 3:21-26; Revelation 1:5-6]?
     
    6. What is the reason believers are “eagerly awaiting for” Jesus [Hebrews 9:28]? Consult also Acts 1:11; Philippians 3:20-21; and Titus 2:11-14 for hope to persevere without ever turning back?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Our sins are debts that none can pay but Christ. It is not our tears, but His blood; it is not our sighs, but His sufferings, that can testify for our sins. Christ must pay all, or we are prisoners forever.” (Thomas Brooks)
  • Feb 2, 2020Written on Our Hearts – Deric Bartlett
    Feb 2, 2020
    Written on Our Hearts – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message called 'Written on Our Hearts', based on Hebrews 7-8.
     
    1. Jesus is greater than Abraham
    2. Jesus is greater than the law
    3. Jesus is the Savior of those who draw near to God through Him
    4. Jesus is the source of new life
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What food do you love that a lot of people might find a little odd?
     
    1. The mysterious figure of Melchizedek first appears in Genesis 14:18-20, then in Psalm 110:4, and finally in Hebrews 5:6, 10, 6:20, and 7:1-17. What do you learn about him from these verses? How does he show the superiority of Jesus over all rivals?
     
    2. How is Jesus’ priesthood an improvement over the Levitical priesthood [Hebrews 7:18-25]? How does this give you encouragement to “draw near to God” [Hebrews 7:25]? Consider also Luke 22:31-32; John 17:6-26; and Romans 8:34.
     
    3. Why is it “fitting that we should have such a high priest” like Jesus [Hebrews 7:26]? What sets Him apart from all who preceded Him or try to follow Him? What difference does this make to you? Consult also 2 Corinthians 5:21; Hebrews 2:17; and 1 Peter 1:17-21.
     
    4. Hebrews 8:1-7 speaks of heavenly and earthly realities. Contrast the two to highlight the superiority of the heavenly realities. How does this help you prioritize “the things above” [cf. John 3:11-15; Ephesians 2:4-7; and Colossians 3:1-4]?
     
    5. Hebrews 8:7-9 quotes from Jeremiah 31:31-32, stating the old covenant was obsolete. Why was it ineffective [cf. Isaiah 1:10-20; Isaiah 29:13; Ezekiel 33:31-32; and Matthew 15:1-9]? What does this tell you about the weakness of merely performing religious rituals?
     
    6. The quote from Jeremiah 31:33-34 in Hebrews 8:10-12 promises a better covenant. What is special about this new covenant, and what are the results God is looking for [cf. Jeremiah 24:7; 2 Corinthians 3:12-18; and Galatians 3:23-29]?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Jesus Christ carries on intercession for us in heaven; the Holy Ghost carries on intercession in us on earth; and we the saints have to carry on intercession for all men.” (Oswald Chambers)
  • Jan 26, 2020The God Who Goes the Extra Mile – Deric Bartlett
    Jan 26, 2020
    The God Who Goes the Extra Mile – Deric Bartlett

    Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message called "The God Who Goes the Extra Mile' based on Hebrews 6:13-20.

    Questions:

    ICEBREAKER: What website or app doesn’t exist, but you really wish it did?

    1. The backstory to Hebrews 6:13-15 is found in Genesis 22, and the quote is from verse 17. What was God’s promise to Abraham, and what did Abraham do that led to receiving the promise (see context)? How does Abraham’s example challenge you?

    2. We are told that Abraham obtained the promise by persevering. Why do you think perseverance is so important in all areas of life, and what are its spiritual benefits? Consider also 1 Thessalonians 5:14; James 5:7-8, 11; and 2 Peter 3:9.

    3. God guaranteed His promise to us with an oath to show the unchangeable character of His purpose [Hebrews 6:17]. What is God’s purpose, and how does it give you a sense of purpose? Consult also Acts 2:22-24; Acts 20:25-27, 32; and Ephesians 1:11-14.

    4. How does the fact that God does not lie [Hebrews 6:18] help you face the trials and temptations of this life? Reflect also on Numbers 23:19; 1 Samuel 15:29; and Titus 1:2.

    5. What is the hope that is set before us that we’re to hold fast to [Hebrews 6:18]? How does this serve as a refuge for those who flee to it [cf. Acts 23:6; Acts 26:4-8; and 1 Peter 1:3-9]?

    6. Who serves as the anchor of the soul [Hebrews 6:19], and how does He secure our hope [Hebrews 6:20]? How does this truth help you in the middle of life’s storms [cf. Psalm 62:5-8; Romans 5:1-5; 1 Peter 2:4-6]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Outside of the cross of Jesus Christ, there is no hope in this world. That cross and resurrection at the core of the Gospel is the only hope for humanity. Wherever you go, ask God for wisdom on how to get that Gospel in, even in the toughest situations of life.” (Ravi Zacharias)

  • Jan 19, 2020Breaking The Surface – Brad Lehman
    Jan 19, 2020
    Breaking The Surface – Brad Lehman
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Brad shares some tips on how to improve your prayer life titled 'Breaking the Surface' based on Acts 4:23-31.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What was your favourite vehicle that you’ve owned?
     
    1. The context for Acts 4:23-31 began in Acts 3:1. What was the backstory that instigated this prayer? What was noticeably different about the early Christians, and what caused the change [cf. Mark 5:18-19; Luke 19:7-10; John 4:28-29]?
     
    2. How did these early believers begin their prayer in Acts 4:24? Why is worshiping God – rehearsing Who He is and what He has done – such a priority in prayer? Consult also 2 Kings 19:14-19; Nehemiah 9:5b-15; and Isaiah 6:1-7.
     
    3. What do you learn about the value of the Bible as an aid to prayer from Acts 4:25-26? What are the benefits of praying Scripture [cf. Psalm 19:7-11; Matthew 6:9-13; 2 Timothy 3:14-17]?
     
    4. The prayer of these early Christians acknowledged the evil perpetrated by Jesus’ enemies [Acts 4:27]. Yet, they were confident God sovereignly superintended everything for His purposes [Acts 4:28]. How does their confidence in the Lord inspire you in your life challenges [cf. Acts 2:23-24; Romans 8:28; Ephesians 1:11-12]?
     
    5. These early Christians did not pray for deliverance from persecution but boldness in persecution [Acts 4:29]. What does this tell you about the purpose and power of prayer [cf. Acts 4:13; Philippians 1:12-14; 1Thessalonians 2:1-2]?
     
    6. Notice the order of the events in Acts 4:31 – prayer, God’s presence, empowerment, and mission. What do we learn about ministry and mission from this order [Acts 9:17-22; Acts 11:23-26; Ephesians 5:17-20]?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The right way to pray is to stretch out our hands and ask of One who we know has the heart of a Father.” (Dietrich Bonhoeffer)
  • Jan 12, 2020The Elephant in the Room – Deric Bartlett
    Jan 12, 2020
    The Elephant in the Room – Deric Bartlett
    Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message titled 'The Elephant in the Room', based on Hebrews 6:4-12.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What has taken you the longest to get good or decent at?
     
    1. The little term “for” at the start of Hebrews 6:4 is significant because it looks back to Hebrews 5:11-6:3. The author addressed the need for spiritual progress, not stagnation, or worse, retreat. Why is Christian maturity so necessary to spiritual health [cf. Luke 8:14; Ephesians 4:13-15; Colossians 1:27-29]?
     
    2. Does Hebrews 6:4-5 describe a genuine believer in Jesus? Examine the use of these key terms in Hebrews: “enlightened” [10:32]; “tasted” [2:9]; “shared” [3:1,14]; and “miracles” [2:4] in your response.
     
    3. According to Hebrews 6:6, apostasy is a real danger. What are the consequences listed in this text of falling away from following Jesus [cf. Luke 8:13; 1 Timothy 1:19; 1 Timothy 4:1-3; Hebrews 3:12]?
     
    4. Hebrews 6:7-8 begins with another “for”, leading to an illustration that clarifies the author’s point in 6:4-6. How does this example from agriculture help you understand this warning [cf. Matthew 3:7-10; Matthew 7:15-20; Luke 8:13-15; John 15:6]?
     
    5. As a good pastor, following a stern warning, the author went on to encourage his readers [Hebrews 6:9-10]. What had he seen in them, according to this text, that gave him reason for optimism [cf. Colossians 1:3-8; 2 Thessalonians 1:3-4; Revelation 3:7-13]?
     
    6. The term “sluggish” [Hebrews 6:12] is the same term translated “dull” of hearing in Hebrews 5:11. What are some signs of “spiritual sluggishness” listed in Hebrews 5:11-6:3 that we should avoid? What are some remedies to keep us moving forward, particularly in Hebrews 6:11-12, as well as Romans 12:11; Hebrews 13:7; and James 1:2-4?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?