Sermons

Sep 15, 2019
The Greatest Claims in History – Deric Bartlett
This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled The Greatest Claims in History focusing on Hebrews 1:1-14.
 
Questions
Hebrews 1:1-14.
ICEBREAKER: If you could add two commandments to the existing ten, what would they be?
1. The author of Hebrews emphasizes that God had spoken to us – in the past through the prophets, and in the present in His Son [Hebrews 1:1-2]. What does this tell us about God and the authority of His word? Consider Exodus 20:1-20, 2 Timothy 3:16-17, and 2 Peter 1:19-21 as well.
2. Hebrews 1:1-4 contains one of the most exalted and comprehensive descriptions of Jesus found in all of Scripture. What does this text affirm about Jesus’ identity and activity, and how do each of these descriptions impact your spiritual walk with Him?
3. Many false ideas about angels exist today. What do the following texts assert about them: Matthew 13:41-42; Matthew 22:30; Matthew 25:31; Luke 16:22; Luke 20:30; Acts 27:23-25; Acts 10:3, 22; Colossians 1:16; and Hebrews 2:7?
4. Throughout Hebrews 1, Jesus is referred to as the Son [Hebrews 1:2, 3, 5, 8]. From this chapter, what is the significance of this title for Jesus, and why does it matter?
5. How does Hebrews 5:8 affirm the deity of Jesus? Examine also Isaiah 9:6-7; Matthew 1:23; John 10:30; and Titus 2:13 for more Scriptural support. Why is this important?
6. In Hebrews 1:14, angels are called “ministering spirits” sent to serve believers. Do you find this concerning, confusing, or comforting? How do such passages as 2 Kings 6:15-17; Isaiah 6:6-7; Psalm 34:7, Acts 1:11 and Matthew 28:1-7 encourage you?
7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
 
“The ultimate key to joining together in radical obedience to Christ is found in fostering a humble view of ourselves and a high view of God in the church. [Let us] give ourselves in total abandonment for His great purpose in the world: the declaration of His gospel and the demonstration of His glory to all the peoples of the earth.” (David Platt)
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  • Sep 15, 2019The Greatest Claims in History – Deric Bartlett
    Sep 15, 2019
    The Greatest Claims in History – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled The Greatest Claims in History focusing on Hebrews 1:1-14.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 1:1-14.
    ICEBREAKER: If you could add two commandments to the existing ten, what would they be?
    1. The author of Hebrews emphasizes that God had spoken to us – in the past through the prophets, and in the present in His Son [Hebrews 1:1-2]. What does this tell us about God and the authority of His word? Consider Exodus 20:1-20, 2 Timothy 3:16-17, and 2 Peter 1:19-21 as well.
    2. Hebrews 1:1-4 contains one of the most exalted and comprehensive descriptions of Jesus found in all of Scripture. What does this text affirm about Jesus’ identity and activity, and how do each of these descriptions impact your spiritual walk with Him?
    3. Many false ideas about angels exist today. What do the following texts assert about them: Matthew 13:41-42; Matthew 22:30; Matthew 25:31; Luke 16:22; Luke 20:30; Acts 27:23-25; Acts 10:3, 22; Colossians 1:16; and Hebrews 2:7?
    4. Throughout Hebrews 1, Jesus is referred to as the Son [Hebrews 1:2, 3, 5, 8]. From this chapter, what is the significance of this title for Jesus, and why does it matter?
    5. How does Hebrews 5:8 affirm the deity of Jesus? Examine also Isaiah 9:6-7; Matthew 1:23; John 10:30; and Titus 2:13 for more Scriptural support. Why is this important?
    6. In Hebrews 1:14, angels are called “ministering spirits” sent to serve believers. Do you find this concerning, confusing, or comforting? How do such passages as 2 Kings 6:15-17; Isaiah 6:6-7; Psalm 34:7, Acts 1:11 and Matthew 28:1-7 encourage you?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The ultimate key to joining together in radical obedience to Christ is found in fostering a humble view of ourselves and a high view of God in the church. [Let us] give ourselves in total abandonment for His great purpose in the world: the declaration of His gospel and the demonstration of His glory to all the peoples of the earth.” (David Platt)
  • Sep 8, 2019No Turning Back Introduction – Deric Bartlett
    Sep 8, 2019
    No Turning Back Introduction – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric begins the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Introduction to Studies in the Book of Hebrews focusing on Hebrews 12:1-3.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 12:1-3
    ICEBREAKER: Describe an embarrassing incident that happened in elementary school.
    1. Hebrews 1:1 - 4 contains at least 7 descriptions of Jesus, God’s Son, showing the reasons He is God’s supreme revelation. How many can you identify from this text, and what difference does each make in your daily walk with the Lord?
    2. “To drift” implies a gradual change over time [Hebrews 2:1]. Apparently, this was, and still is, a very real danger for believers. Based on this text, what can we do to prevent drifting away? Also consult Deuteronomy 4:9-10, Proverbs 4:23, Acts 20:28 - 31, and Romans 16:17 - 18 for more strategies.
    3. How do you, as one of God’s holy people who shares in a heavenly calling, practice the discipline of “consider(ing) Jesus” [Hebrews 3:1]? Examine Philippians 2:5 - 11, Colossians 1:13 - 20, Hebrews 4:14 - 16, and 1 Peter 2:21 - 23 for further insights.
    4. The struggle to not fall away, to not be hardened by sin’s deceitfulness, and to not rebel against God’s voice [Hebrews 3:12 - 15] requires the help of God’s people to exhort us each day [Hebrews 3:13]. What does this exhortation include according to this text, as well as Acts 14:19 - 23; Colossians 3:12 - 17, and Revelation 3:14 - 22?
    5. Believers are commanded to “hold fast to our confession” [Hebrews 4:14]. This does not refer to confessing our sins, but to publicly proclaiming our allegiance to Christ. How do we best do this according to this text, as well as 1 Timothy 6:12, Hebrews 3:1, and Hebrews 10:19 - 25?
    6. How does Jesus’ example in Hebrews 12:1 - 3 motivate you to run the Christian race with endurance? Look closely at 1 Corinthians 9:24 - 27, 1 Timothy 4:6 - 8, and James 5:7 - 11 for other inspiring examples of endurance.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “To endure the cross is not tragedy; it is the suffering which is the fruit of an exclusive allegiance to Jesus Christ.” (Dietrich Bonhoeffer)
  • Sep 1, 2019Are We Ready? – Max Oates
    Sep 1, 2019
    Are We Ready? – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Max preached a sermon titled Are We Ready? focusing on 1 Peter 3:13-17.
     
    Questions
    1 Peter 3:13-17.
    ICEBREAKER: What would be on the menu for your favourite meal?
    1. The Apostle Peter wrote his first letter to challenge believers to live holy lives while facing a hostile culture [1 Peter 1:1; 2:11-12]. Where have you observed cultural hostility toward Christians lately? Do you find this surprising or not? Why?
    2. The specifics of “what is good” [1 Peter 3:13] are spelled out in 1 Peter 3:8-12. Why would anyone harm another for doing “what is good”? Consider 2 Corinthians 4:3-4, Ephesians 4:17-19, and 1 Peter 4:3-4 in your response.
    3. How can suffering for righteousness’ sake be a blessing [1 Peter 3:14]? Examine Matthew 5:10-12, Romans 8:16-22, 2 Corinthians 12:9-10, and Philippians 1:27-30 for clues.
    4. Historically, Christian communities have variously attempted to hide from the world, deride the world, or side with the world. But 1 Peter 3:15 calls us to come alongside the world with a ready answer for our faith. Where does this calling originate, and how are we to pursue it [cf. Matthew 28:19-20, Acts 1:8, 2 Corinthians 5:17-21]?
    5. What is “the hope that is in you” [1 Peter 3:15]? Consult Acts 24:14-15, Titus 2:11-14, and 1 John 3:2-3 for further insights.
    6. The gospel’s power to change lives resides in the Person of Christ Jesus and the accurate proclamation of the truth. However, the believer’s demeanour is also influential [1 Peter 3:16]. How do our approaches and attitudes affect unbelievers’ receptivity to the gospel according to this text, as well as Colossians 4:5-6, Titus 3:1-7, 1 Peter 2:12, and 1 Peter 3:1-2?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “What an incredible witness it is to a lost and fearful society when the Christian acts like a child of God, living under the loving sovereignty of the Heavenly Father.” (Henry Blackaby)
  • Aug 25, 2019The Fight of Faith – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 25, 2019
    The Fight of Faith – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric concludes the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled The Fight of Faith focusing on Ephesians 6:10-20.
     
    Questions
    Ephesians 6:10-20
    ICEBREAKER: Describe a memorable uncle.
    1. The Apostle Paul’s famous discourse on the Christian’s spiritual armour [Ephesians 6:10-20] falls on the heels of his instructions for godly relationships in the home [Ephesians 5:21-6:9]. Do you think the home is a potential battleground? In what ways? Are relationships at risk from the evil one? Why do you think he attacks relationships?
    2. It is always dangerous to get our spiritual beliefs from pop culture. How does our culture view the supernatural world? What is the truth as outlined in Ephesians 6:11,12, 16, 18, as well as 2 Corinthians 10:4-6, James 4:7, and 2 Peter 5:8-9?
    3. What do you infer from all the battle imagery and terminology in Ephesians 6:10-20? How does this make you feel? How should you best prepare [cf. 1 Corinthians 16:13, Romans 13:11-14, 2 Corinthians 2:11]?
    4. Several times in this text [Ephesians 6:11, 13, 14], we are challenged to stand firm in the face of formidable foes. This requires great courage. How does each piece of God’s spiritual armour encourage you to prevail?
    5. What are some of the evil one’s “flaming arrows” [Ephesians 6:16] that need to be extinguished? Consult Genesis 3:1-5, Matthew 4:1-10, John 8:44, 2 Corinthians 11:3-4, and 1 John 3:4-10 for further insights.
    6. Why is persevering prayer so crucial to spiritual warfare [Ephesians 6:18-20]? What does this say about the best strategy to overcome evil [cf. Matthew 6:13; Matthew 26:41; Philippians 4:6-7; and Colossians 4:2-4]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The tragedy today is that many Christians think they are fighting flesh and blood in their marital and parenting issues, rather than realizing that Satan has an agenda to destroy their home. Whoever controls the family controls the future.” (Tony Evans, Victory in Spiritual Warfare)
     
    “You are not fighting for victory—you are fighting from victory. This battle has already been won!” (Tony Evans, Victory in Spiritual Warfare)
  • Aug 18, 2019Delivered From All My Fears – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 18, 2019
    Delivered From All My Fears – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Delivered From All My Fears focusing on Psalms 34:1-10
     
    Questions
    Psalms 34:1-10
    ICEBREAKER: Do you have any phobias?
    1. The most often repeated command in the Bible is, “Do not fear!” [Examples: Exodus 20:20; Joshua 8:1; Luke 1:30; Revelation 2:10]. To overcome your fears, you must be able to identify them and admit them. What are your most debilitating fears? How are they hindering your walk with the Lord as well as your relationships with others?
    2. Examine Numbers 13:17-14:10. How did the Israelites’ fear of the people of Canaan affect their choices and actions [Numbers 14:9-10]? Notice the correlation of fear and rebellion against God’s clearly revealed will. What conclusions do you draw from this story?
    3. In Isaiah 7, King Ahaz and his people feared invading armies [Isaiah 7:1-2]. The prophet Isaiah challenged him to trust in the Lord’s deliverance [7:3-9], and even offered a sign to confirm the prophecy [7:10-11]. Ahaz refused the sign under the pretense of piety, but he was covering up his unbelief. God gave him the sign anyway – the birth of a child named Immanuel (“God with us”) [7:13-14]. How does the promise of God’s presence address your fears? What is the best strategy to face your fears based on this text?
    4. Psalm 139:23-24 is King David’s sincere prayer for God’s examination of his heart and innermost thoughts. He requested God’s light to expose his darkness. Note the relationship between his anxious thoughts and grievous ways. What does this show you about the detrimental effects of your fears? How does this insight help you combat your fears?
    5. Near the end of Jesus’ time with His disciples, He told them he was going to leave them [John 13:36; 14:28]. Obviously, they found this news distressing [14:1]. To counter their anxieties, Jesus offered them His peace [14:27]. What is distinctive about His peace, and Who brings it to us [14:26]?
    6. Philippians 4:4-7 provides God’s strategy for dealing with believers’ fearful anxieties. Meditate on these verses and come up with a list of definite steps you can take to experience His promised peace.
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Faith, which is trust, and fear are opposite poles. If a man has the one, he can scarcely have the other in vigorous operation. He that has his trust set upon God does not need to dread anything except the weakening or the paralyzing of that trust.” (Alexander MacLaren)
  • Aug 11, 2019Healing for the Heart – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 11, 2019
    Healing for the Heart – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Healing for the Heart focusing on Proverbs 14:30.
     
    Questions
    Proverbs 14:30
    ICEBREAKER: Have you ever had a physical wound that took you a period of time to recover from? What was it, and what was the recovery process like?
    1. For Christians, the center-point of our faith is what Jesus accomplished on the cross. What initially comes to your mind when you think of the cross, and why Jesus died for us?
    2. Think about a diamond. It has many sides, called facets, and these all make up the shape of the stone. Keep this illustration in mind as you reflect on the cross. What different pictures—or facets—do we see from Scripture about the cross, and about what Jesus accomplished there? Look up the following passages, note down observations, then discuss your findings together (see Colossians 2:13-15; Acts 2:23; Mark 2:17; 10:45; John 1:29; Romans 3:23-25; Galatians 3:13-14; Ephesians 2:11-16; 5:25-27; Titus 3:3-7; Hebrews 2:14-18; 1 Peter 2:24-25; Isaiah 53:5).
    3. When we have grasped the message of the cross and how we can have forgiveness through Jesus and security for the afterlife, we can often stop there. But Scripture’s multi-faceted picture of the cross tells us there is so much more to why Jesus died for us. Forgiveness is offered to us because God wants us to have a restored relationship with Him. In that way, it is the foundation of our relationship, but only the beginning of the relationship God wants with us. Reflect on what the Scripture says about God’s intention for us to be reconciled with Him (see John 14:27; 15:9-11; Psalm 16:11; Romans 5:3-5; Revelation 19:6-9).
    4. The wounds and hurts we carry with us in life often prevent us from experiencing the joy and peace in our hearts that God wants us to enjoy in relationship with Him. How could unhealed wounds affect people, or you personally? And why do you think it is important that we find healing for our past wounds?
    5. In his Soul Care book, Rob Reimer says: “Sadly, sometimes these hurts [from our past] are protected behind a fortress of defense mechanisms that keep us from accessing them. The fortress is not a healing refuge. The walls must come down, and we must let Jesus into our painful places, for He alone is the Healer” (p.150). What “defense mechanisms” have you seen in people (or in yourself personally) that keep us from processing our hurts with God?
    6. What can each of us do to curb our habits of avoiding facing our pain, and carve out more space and time to process them with the Lord?
    7. What did you find challenging or helpful about this Sunday’s message?
     
     
  • Aug 4, 2019Your Ancestry Sin – Deric Bartlett
    Aug 4, 2019
    Your Ancestry Sin – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Your Ancestry Sin focusing on Ephesians 5:31-32.
     
    Questions
    Ephesians 5:31-32
    ICEBREAKER: Have you ever accomplished something in your life that others (or even you!) thought you would never be able to do? What was it? How were you able to succeed when the odds were against you? How did you feel when it was over?
    1. Abraham’s story has about as good a beginning as one could imagine! Blessings and a covenant promise from God Himself! In time, things begin to deteriorate, and sin patterns emerge. Read these short chapters, Genesis 12-17. Can you identify the sin patterns and possible causes for these patterns to gain a strong foothold in this family?
    2. David is as well known for his personal failures as he is for his successes. Read 2 Samuel 12:1-23. How is it that David is able to change his sin patterns? Read 1 Chronicles 21:1-27. After disobeying God again, how does David react to his sin? How does God respond and what is the result?
    3. Jacob’s love for his son Joseph actually ends up hurting Joseph. How far back can you trace this pattern of favouritism in Joseph’s family? (ex. read Genesis 25:19 – 37:36)
    4. Joseph is remembered as a success and as a victim. How is Joseph able to rise up and avoid a ‘victim mentality’ even though he was clearly hurt by others? (read Genesis 39-41)
    5. Looking back at your family history, what sin patterns can you identify? How have you seen these patterns influence your family? What have you learned from Scripture that you can now apply to your own situation and family life ?
    6. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “When kingdom culture clashes with my American culture or my family-of- origin culture, I must choose Kingdom culture.” – Dr. Rob Reimer
  • Jul 28, 2019The Trouble with Forgiveness – Max Oates
    Jul 28, 2019
    The Trouble with Forgiveness – Max Oates
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Max continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled The Trouble with Forgiveness focusing on Micah 7:18-20.
     
    Questions
    Micah 7:18-20
    ICEBREAKER: Has anyone ever shown you mercy? What happened, and how did it make you feel?
    1. The minor prophet, Micah, lamented the many social ills of his day in Micah 7:1-6. Do you notice any parallels to today? Yet, he shared his hope in God’s restoration in Micah 7:7-17. Are you maintaining your hope in this chaotic world? How?
    2. Micah 7:18 begins with a question that expects the answer: “No one!” How do we know that God is unlike every other so-called “god”? What sets Him apart, according to this text as well as Numbers 14:18, 1 Kings 14:18, and Isaiah 55:7?
    3. Micah celebrates the forgiveness of the Lord in Micah 7:18 by writing that our God “pardons iniquity” and “passes over transgression”. What does this indicate about the reality of our offences, and the greatness of God’s grace?
    4. How do you reconcile the anger of God and the love of God [Micah 7:18]? Consider Exodus 34:6-7, Jeremiah 3:12-14, and Nehemiah 9:16-17 in your response.
    5. Mercy is the withholding of punishment or judgment that one deserves [Micah 7:19]. How has God shown you mercy? How can you show mercy to others [cf. Matthew 5:7, Matthew 9:9-13, and Matthew 18:23-35]?
    6. What are appropriate responses to God’s willingness to forgive us our sins [cf. Psalm 103:8-14, Matthew 18:21-22, Mark 11:25, Luke 7:44-47, and Ephesians 4:32]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Forgiveness is the economy of the heart. Forgiveness saves the expense of anger, the cost of hatred, the waste of spirits.” (Hannah More)
  • Jul 21, 2019Confessing Christians – Deric Bartlett
    Jul 21, 2019
    Confessing Christians – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Confessing Christians focusing on 1 John 1 :1- 10.
     
    Questions
    Galatians 1 John 1: 1 - 10
    ICEBREAKER: Did you ever run away from home?
    1. How important is it to you that the gospel writers, including the apostle John, were actual eye-witnesses of Jesus’ earthly life [1 John 1:1-2]? What difference does this make in your faith [cf. Luke 24:45-48; Acts 10:34-43; 2 Peter 1:16]?
    2. In today’s world, everyone thinks morality is determined by what they feel is right or wrong for them. How does the Word of God counter this dangerous falsehood with the necessity of repentance [cf. Matthew 3:7-12; Luke 5:31-32; 2 Timothy 2:24- 26]?
    3. How does the assertion that “God is light, and in him is no darkness at all” [1 John 1:5] affect your understanding of God’s character and mission? Consider other texts such as John 3:19-21, John 8:12, and John 9:5 in your response.
    4. In the book, Soul Care, the author writes, “A soul in alignment is a soul without secrets. We cannot walk free if we will not repent from sin and bring it into the light with God and others” [p. 78]. What are the negative consequences of remaining in the dark [1 John 1:6]? What are the positives of walking in God’s light [1 John 1:7]?
    5. The doomed attempt to appear perfect or faultless is an unhealthy, debilitating burden to bear. According to 1 John 1: 8 and 10, what results from such false appearances? What does this reveal about the power of unchecked, unconfessed sin [cf. Genesis 4:6-7; Isaiah 53:6; James 3:2]?
    6. What are the liberating effects of humbly and authentically taking full ownership for our part in our sin [1 John 1:9]? Reflect on Psalm 32, Psalm 139:23-24, Acts 13:37-39, and Acts 28:18 for further insights.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Few things accelerate the peace process as much as humbly admitting our own wrongdoing and asking forgiveness.” (Lee Strobel)
  • Jul 14, 2019Let’s Talk About You – Deric Bartlett
    Jul 14, 2019
    Let’s Talk About You – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Let's Talk About You! focusing on Galatians 2:20
     
    Questions
    Galatians 2:20
    ICEBREAKER: Are you known more as a person who follows all the “rules” or someone who paints outside the lines? How has this been a help or a hindrance to you in the past?
    1. Consider the context of today’s text: Galatians 2:15-19. Compare with Matthew 5:17-19, Philippians 3:9 and Romans 8:1-8. What do you learn about the Law from these passages? How does the Law relate to the life of a Christian today? What other passages of Scripture would you use to support your ideas?
    2. Examine Colossians 2:20, 3:3, 2 Timothy 2:11 and Romans 6:3-14 with today’s text. What does it mean to be “crucified with Christ”?
    3. Read Romans 1:1, James 1:1, 2 Peter 1:1 and Jude 1:1. What do these verses suggest to you about the way the disciples viewed their identity?
    4. Reflect on Galatians 2:20 from the perspective of 1 Corinthians 11:1 and 1 Peter 2:21. How do these passages impact the way you respond to events in your day-to-day life?
    5. How is the person others perceive you to be different than the person you really are? What other passages of Scripture do you turn to when you experience doubt or confusion about your own identity?
    6. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Jesus came to announce to us that an identity based on success, popularity and power is a false identity- an illusion! Loudly and clearly he says: ‘You are not what the world makes you; but you are children of God.” ― Henri J.M. Nouwen, Here and Now: Living in the Spirit
  • Jul 7, 2019Restored – Deric Bartlett
    Jul 7, 2019
    Restored – Deric Bartlett
    Series: Restored
    This week Pastor Deric begins the series Restored-The Pathway to a Healthy Soul with a sermon titled Restored focusing on Psalm 23.
     
    Questions
    Psalm 23
    ICEBREAKER: If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be? Why?
    1. According to Psalm 23:1-4, along with 1 Samuel 17:34-35, Psalm 28:9, Isaiah 40:11, and John 10:1-16, what are the roles and functions of an effective shepherd?
    2. Psalm 23 is full of first-person personal pronouns (“me”, “I”), indicating it has an intensely personal message. Insert your personal name whenever one of these personal pronouns appears and read it out loud. How does this make you feel as you reflect on God’s personal interest and care for you?
    3. Our culture seems bent on living the fast-paced, frenzied, and frazzled lifestyle. Psalm 23:1-3 counters with a message of rest, restoration and refreshment. How are you choosing each day to resist the rush of the world and to rest in your relationship with the Lord? Consider Jeremiah 6:16, Matthew 11:28-30, and Luke 10:38-42 for further insights.
    4. Why do our souls require restoring by our Great Shepherd [Psalm 23:3]? Consult Jeremiah 17:9-10, Matthew 15:18-20, Romans 3:23-24, and Galatians 5:16-24 for deeper understanding.
    5. Life inevitably leads through valleys of deep darkness where danger, despair and doubt lurk [Psalm 23:4]. How does the promise of God’s presence comfort and encourage you from this text, as well as Exodus 33:12-17, Deuteronomy 31:6, Isaiah 43:1-3, Psalm 46:1-3, and Psalm 121?
    6. Psalm 23:1-4 depicts a shepherd with a sheep. In Psalm 23:5-6, the picture shifts to a royal banquet. How does the portrayal that you are an invited and honoured guest of God inspire you to live in close relationship with Him? Examine Psalm 27:4-6, 2 Corinthians 5:1-10, and Revelation 19:5-9 for deeper appreciation.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Jesus Christ became Incarnate for one purpose, to make a way back to God that man might stand before Him as He was created to do, the friend and lover of God Himself.” (Oswald Chambers)
  • Jun 30, 2019I Need a Rest – Max Oates
    Jun 30, 2019
    I Need a Rest – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Max preached a sermon titled I Need a Rest focusing on Matthew 11:28-30.
     
    Questions
    Matthew 11.28-30
    ICEBREAKER: What is your favourite place in the world? Why?
    1. As John the Baptist languished in Herod’s prison [Matthew 11:2-3], he wrestled with some doubts regarding Jesus’ identity. How did Jesus address John’s concerns [11:4-6]? How do texts such as Isaiah 29:18, Isaiah 35:5, and Isaiah 61:1 relate to Jesus’ response?
    2. Three times Jesus asked the question, “What did you go out to see?” regarding John the Baptist’s ministry [Matthew 11:7-9]. What was John’s role according to this text and others such as Isaiah 40:1, Malachi 3:1, and Malachi 4:5-6?
    3. According to Matthew 11:11 as well as Matthew 5:19, Matthew 18:6, and Luke 9:46- 48, how does one become “great” in the kingdom of heaven and avoid being “least”?
    4. Neither John nor Jesus was able to get everyone to accept them [Matthew 11:16-19]. What was both John and Jesus looking for from the people they addressed [cf. Matthew 3:2, Matthew 4:1, and Matthew 11:20]? What does this response look like?
    5. Why do you think Jesus denounced the cities of Galilee and pronounced a greater degree of punishment on Judgement Day for them than some of the most wicked cities recorded in the Old Testament [Matthew 11:20- 24]? Examine Isaiah 1:1-20 and John 15:18-25 for further insights.
    6. Jesus promised “rest” for those who come to Him [Matthew 11:28-29]. What does that rest look like and what are the prerequisites for experiencing it according to John 14:1-6, Hebrews 4:1-16, and Revelation 22:17?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters. He restores my soul.” (King David)
  • Jun 23, 2019Our Place in God’s Commitment – Max Oates
    Jun 23, 2019
    Our Place in God’s Commitment – Max Oates
    Series: COMMITTED
    This week Pastor Max concludes the series Committed with a sermon titled Our Place in God's Commitment focusing on 1 Thessalonians 5:12-22
     
    Questions
    1 Thessalonians 5:12-22
    ICEBREAKER: Who were your role models when you were younger?
    1. Leaders are expected to work hard, to provide oversight on the Lord’s behalf, and to admonish those under their care. What is expected of those being led [1 Thessalonians 5:12-13], and how are they to do this according to this text as well as 1 Corinthians 16:15-18, Philippians 2:25-30 and Hebrews 13:17?
    2. The measure of a community’s character is in its treatment of the vulnerable. How are we encouraged to serve those who are hurting among us [1 Thessalonians 5:14]? What would this look like within our church family?
    3. Revenge seems sweet, but ultimately embitters us. How are followers of Jesus to respond when wronged [1Thessalonians 5:15; Matthew 5:38-48; Romans 12:17- 19; 1 Peter 3:9]?
    4. God’s will for believers’ lives is made clear in 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18. Rejoicing, praying, and giving thanks are commanded as habitual practices for every believer. How do we obey these within the context of our brutal, busy and broken world?
    5. How does one quench the Spirit [1 Thessalonians 5:19]? Consider Isaiah 63:10, Acts 5:3, Acts 7:51 and Ephesians 4:30 in your response.
    6. One of the functions of the Word of God is to train believers to be discerning [1 Thessalonians 5:20-22]. How does the Word of God accomplish this according to these verses as well as Psalm 19:7-14, Philippians 4:8, and 1 John 4:1-3?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Men compare themselves with men, and readily with the worst, and flatter themselves with that comparative betterness. This is not the way to see spots, to look into the muddy streams of profane men’s lives; but look into the clear fountain of the Word, and there we may both discern and wash them; and consider the infinite holiness of God, and this will humble us to the dust.” (Robert Leighton)
  • Jun 16, 2019Heavenly Help for the Home – Deric Bartlett
    Jun 16, 2019
    Heavenly Help for the Home – Deric Bartlett
    Series: COMMITTED
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Committed with a sermon titled Heavenly Help for the Home focusing on biblical parenting principles.
     
    Questions
    ICEBREAKER: Describe something unique (life lesson, favourite saying, life hack, dream, ability, etc.) that you learned from your father.
    1. We believe that God’s Word is His revelation of Himself and His ways to us. Therefore, it does not originate in people’s minds but God’s [Deuteronomy 6:1-2]. How does this affect your attitude toward the Word of God and its authority to speak into every aspect of your life, including your family?
    2. How would you implement the commands of Deuteronomy 6:6-9 in your household? What do you do formally to instruct our family in God’s ways? What informal opportunities do you look for to bring God’s Word into your family’s life?
    3. In Genesis 18:19, the LORD stated that Abraham’s responsibility was to command his family to keep God’s ways by doing what is right and just. What does that look like according to this text, as well as Jeremiah 22:3, Jeremiah 22:15-17, and Ezekiel 18:5-9?
    4. Joshua, as leader of Israel, challenged the nation to make a choice regarding whom they would serve [Joshua 24:14-15]. He had determined to lead His family to serve/worship the LORD. What would his family do, and not do, according to this text?
    5. Proverbs 4 is written by a parent to a child. From this chapter, what insights do you gain that pertain to child-raising? What should children be encouraged to pursue, and what should they flee?
    6. According to Hebrews 12:5-11, how should discipline be viewed, even within the dynamics of a family? What does discipline indicate [vs. 6-7]? What is the purpose/goal of discipline [vs. 10-11]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “I was raised in the greatest of homes...just a really great dad, and I miss him so much...he was a good man, a real simple man...Very faithful, always loved my mom, always provided for the kids, and just a lot of fun.” (Max Lucado, Christian Author)
  • Jun 9, 2019Committed to Stir You Up – Deric Bartlett
    Jun 9, 2019
    Committed to Stir You Up – Deric Bartlett
    Series: COMMITTED
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series Committed with a sermon titled Committed to Stir You Up focusing on 1 Thessalonians 5: 1 - 11
     
    Questions
    1 Thessalonians 5:1-11
    ICEBREAKER: What was your worst childhood injury?
    1. The phrase “the day of the Lord” refers to a future time period when the Lord will intervene in human history to complete His plan of redemption and judgment [1 Thessalonians 5:2]. Examine such passages as Joel 2:30-32, Amos 5:18-20, Zephaniah 2:1-3, Malachi 4:1, and 2 Peter 3:10 to find more details.
    2. The world hopes for a brighter future, whereas the Bible speaks of a frightful future for unbelievers [2 Thessalonians 5:3]. Does this prospect propel you forward to reach out to unbelievers [cf. 2 Corinthians 5:16-21; 2 Timothy 4:1-5; Titus 2:11-14]?
    3. From 1 Thessalonians 5:4-5, as well as Matthew 5:13-16, John 8:12, Romans 1:18- 23, and Ephesians 5:3-14, what are the contrasts between living in the light and living in the dark?
    4. Does the term “sleep” in 1 Thessalonians 5:6-7 mean the same as “asleep” in 4:13- 15? How would you explain the different meanings based on their respective contexts?
    5. We are commanded twice to “be sober” [1 Thessalonians 5:6, 8]. What does that look like based on these verses as well as 2 Timothy 4:5, 1 Peter 1:13, 1 Peter 4:7, and 1 Peter 5:8?
    6. How do you reconcile God’s love and His wrath [1 Thessalonians 5:9]? Include John 3:36, Romans 5:8-9, Romans 12:19, and Ephesians 2:3 in your thoughts.
    7. From 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10, how do we specifically encourage and edify one another [1 Thessalonians 5:11]?
    8. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “And many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt. And those who are wise shall shine like the brightness of the sky above; and those who turn many to righteousness, like the stars forever and ever" (Daniel 12:2-3).
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