Sermons

Jul 25, 2021
Riptide – Brad Lehman
This week, Pastor Brad continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Riptide' based on Mark 12:28-35.
 

1. The Questioner [Mark 12:28]: Look for open hearts.

2. The Question [Mark 12:28-31]: Prioritize God’s priorities.

3. The Quest [Mark 12:32-34a]: Be a rogue among the religious.

4. The Conquest [Mark 12:34b]: Fight the riptide by fleeing to Jesus.

 
ICEBREAKER: What, in your opinion, is the most amazing animal?
 

1.   According to Mark 12:28, why did the scribe pose his question to Jesus? What was so extraordinary about Jesus [cf. Matthew 7:28-29; Matthew 13:54; and Matthew 22:34-35]?

2.   Why do you think both Moses in Deuteronomy 6:4-5 and Jesus in Mark 12:29-30 included the affirmation of God’s oneness [cf. 1 Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:4-6; and 1 Timothy 2:5]?

3.   What does it look like in real life to love God with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength [Mark 12:30]? Also consider Joshua 22:5; Psalm 18:1-3; and John 21:15-17 for more insights.

4.   What does it look like to love your neighbour as yourself [Mark 12:31]? Also look up Luke 10:29-37; John 15:12-14; and Romans 12:9-21.

5.   Why is loving God and loving others more important than the religious rituals God prescribed in the Old Testament [Mark 12:33]? Also examine 1 Samuel 15:22-23; Isaiah 1:10-20; and Micah 6:6-8.

6.   Was Jesus condemning or commending the scribe when he told him, “You are not far from the kingdom of God” [Mark 12:34]? Why? Study Matthew 6:33; Acts 17:24-28; and Ephesians 2:13 for further clues.

7.   What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

“To love you as I should, I must worship God as Creator. When I have learnt to love God better than my earthly dearest, I shall love my earthly dearest better than I do now. In so far as I learn to love my earthly dearest at the expense of God and instead of God, I shall be moving towards the state in which I shall not love my earthly dearest at all. When first things are put first, second things are not suppressed but increased.” (C. S. Lewis)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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  • Jul 25, 2021Riptide – Brad Lehman
    Jul 25, 2021
    Riptide – Brad Lehman
    This week, Pastor Brad continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Riptide' based on Mark 12:28-35.
     

    1. The Questioner [Mark 12:28]: Look for open hearts.

    2. The Question [Mark 12:28-31]: Prioritize God’s priorities.

    3. The Quest [Mark 12:32-34a]: Be a rogue among the religious.

    4. The Conquest [Mark 12:34b]: Fight the riptide by fleeing to Jesus.

     
    ICEBREAKER: What, in your opinion, is the most amazing animal?
     

    1.   According to Mark 12:28, why did the scribe pose his question to Jesus? What was so extraordinary about Jesus [cf. Matthew 7:28-29; Matthew 13:54; and Matthew 22:34-35]?

    2.   Why do you think both Moses in Deuteronomy 6:4-5 and Jesus in Mark 12:29-30 included the affirmation of God’s oneness [cf. 1 Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:4-6; and 1 Timothy 2:5]?

    3.   What does it look like in real life to love God with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength [Mark 12:30]? Also consider Joshua 22:5; Psalm 18:1-3; and John 21:15-17 for more insights.

    4.   What does it look like to love your neighbour as yourself [Mark 12:31]? Also look up Luke 10:29-37; John 15:12-14; and Romans 12:9-21.

    5.   Why is loving God and loving others more important than the religious rituals God prescribed in the Old Testament [Mark 12:33]? Also examine 1 Samuel 15:22-23; Isaiah 1:10-20; and Micah 6:6-8.

    6.   Was Jesus condemning or commending the scribe when he told him, “You are not far from the kingdom of God” [Mark 12:34]? Why? Study Matthew 6:33; Acts 17:24-28; and Ephesians 2:13 for further clues.

    7.   What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “To love you as I should, I must worship God as Creator. When I have learnt to love God better than my earthly dearest, I shall love my earthly dearest better than I do now. In so far as I learn to love my earthly dearest at the expense of God and instead of God, I shall be moving towards the state in which I shall not love my earthly dearest at all. When first things are put first, second things are not suppressed but increased.” (C. S. Lewis)

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  • Jul 18, 2021Checkmate – Brad Lehman
    Jul 18, 2021
    Checkmate – Brad Lehman
    This week, Pastor Brad continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Checkmate' based on Mark 12:18-27.

    1. The ________ of the Game: Hard hearts are _______ to the truth.
    2. The ________ of the Game: Checkmate, because only one ________ can be left standing on the board at the end of the game.
    3. The _________ during the Game: Bad ideas produce _______________.
    4. The _________________ to end the Game: The __________ transforms everything!
    Conclusion: Jesus declares “__________” to make me His __________.

    ICEBREAKER: What was something you thought would be easy until you tried it?

    1. What are the implications of a belief system that denies the resurrection [Mark 12:18]? Can you think of modern examples? Consider also Acts 17:32; Acts 23:6-10; and 1 Corinthians 15:12-19.

    2. Although it seems strange to us, how would the practice of levirate marriage provide for the vulnerable in that ancient society [Mark 12:19]? Look up Genesis 38:1-14; Deuteronomy 25:5-10; and Ruth 4:5 for more insights.

    3. How is it possible to be familiar with the Scriptures and yet not know them [Mark 12:24]? What is the difference? What is the remedy [cf. Colossians 3:16; 2 Timothy 2:15; and 2 Timothy 3:14-17]?

    4. The Sadducees were religious leaders, but Jesus said they did not know the power of God [Mark 12:24]. What are some possible reasons that would prevent someone from knowing God’s power [cf. Genesis 18:14; Jeremiah 32:17; and Matthew 19:26]?

    5. What do you find remarkable about Jesus’ teaching in Mark 12:25? How does it make you feel [cf. Romans 7:2-3; 1 Corinthians 7:39-40; and Colossians 3:18-19]?

    6. How does Jesus’ explanation found in Mark 12:26-27 give you hope for the future [cf. John 11:21-27; 1 Corinthians 15:51-58; and 2 Timothy 1:10]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Jesus Christ did not come into this world to make bad people good; he came into this world to make dead people live.” (Lee Strobel)
  • Jul 11, 2021God & Government – Deric Bartlett
    Jul 11, 2021
    God & Government – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'God & Government' based on Mark 12:13-17.


    1.   Don’t __________ when conflicting factions align to discredit Jesus (v.13)

    2.   Don’t __________ by hypocritical rhetoric that is meant to disgrace Jesus (v. 14-16)

    3.   Don’t __________ to a false or forced narrative that is meant to derail Jesus (v. 17)

    ICEBREAKER: What was something you thought would be easy until you tried it?

    1.   In the context of the latter part of Mark 11 and into Mark 12, open hostility and conflict broke out between Jesus and the Jewish religious authorities. What does this signify for those who desire to live godly lives today [cf. Matthew 5:11-12; John 15:18-21; and 2 Timothy 3:10-13]? 

    2.   What does the writer’s comment that some of the Pharisees and Herodians were sent to trap Jesus in His words reveal about the hearts of these religious leaders [Mark 12:13]? Consider also Psalm 34:12-16; Romans 1:28-32; and 1 Peter 2:1. 

    3.   Few words are more deceitful than those recorded in Mark 12:14. What was accurate in the adversaries’ assessment of Jesus? What was inaccurate [cf. Proverbs 26:22-28; Acts 13:4-12; and 2 Corinthians 11:12-15]? 

    4.   Knowing the Lord disapproves of hypocrisy [Mark 12:15], what would be appropriate replacement virtues to pursue [cf. Ephesians 6:5-8; 1 Timothy 1:5; and 1 Peter 1:22-25]? 

    5.   What do you learn about the character of God from the way Jesus dealt with these adversaries who were putting Him to the test [Mark 12:15]? Examine also Exodus 17:1-7; Matthew 4:7; and 1 Corinthians 10:6-13. 

    6.   In your thinking, what things belong to God, and what things belong to Caesar (i.e. the civil government) [Mark 12:17]? How did you determine your answer [cf. Genesis 1:26-27; Romans 13:1-7; and 1 Peter 2:13-17]? 

    7.   What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Remind them to be submissive to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good work, to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show perfect courtesy toward all people.” (Paul of Tarsus) 








  • Jul 11, 2021God & Government – Deric Bartlett
    Jul 11, 2021
    God & Government – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'God & Government' based on Mark 12:13-17.


    1.   Don’t __________ when conflicting factions align to discredit Jesus (v.13)

    2.   Don’t __________ by hypocritical rhetoric that is meant to disgrace Jesus (v. 14-16)

    3.   Don’t __________ to a false or forced narrative that is meant to derail Jesus (v. 17)

    ICEBREAKER: What was something you thought would be easy until you tried it?

    1.   In the context of the latter part of Mark 11 and into Mark 12, open hostility and conflict broke out between Jesus and the Jewish religious authorities. What does this signify for those who desire to live godly lives today [cf. Matthew 5:11-12; John 15:18-21; and 2 Timothy 3:10-13]? 

    2.   What does the writer’s comment that some of the Pharisees and Herodians were sent to trap Jesus in His words reveal about the hearts of these religious leaders [Mark 12:13]? Consider also Psalm 34:12-16; Romans 1:28-32; and 1 Peter 2:1. 

    3.   Few words are more deceitful than those recorded in Mark 12:14. What was accurate in the adversaries’ assessment of Jesus? What was inaccurate [cf. Proverbs 26:22-28; Acts 13:4-12; and 2 Corinthians 11:12-15]? 

    4.   Knowing the Lord disapproves of hypocrisy [Mark 12:15], what would be appropriate replacement virtues to pursue [cf. Ephesians 6:5-8; 1 Timothy 1:5; and 1 Peter 1:22-25]? 

    5.   What do you learn about the character of God from the way Jesus dealt with these adversaries who were putting Him to the test [Mark 12:15]? Examine also Exodus 17:1-7; Matthew 4:7; and 1 Corinthians 10:6-13. 

    6.   In your thinking, what things belong to God, and what things belong to Caesar (i.e. the civil government) [Mark 12:17]? How did you determine your answer [cf. Genesis 1:26-27; Romans 13:1-7; and 1 Peter 2:13-17]? 

    7.   What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Remind them to be submissive to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good work, to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show perfect courtesy toward all people.” (Paul of Tarsus) 








  • Jul 4, 2021The Cornerstone of God’s Plan – Deric Bartlett
    Jul 4, 2021
    The Cornerstone of God’s Plan – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Jesus ROCKS!' based on Mark 12:1-12.

    1. God _________________ to feed the world: (v. 1-8)
    2. God _________________ to die for the sins of the world: (v. 6-9)
    3. God _________________ as the Cornerstone of His plan: (v. 10-12)

    ICEBREAKER: What was the longest trip you have taken?

    1. Why do you think the parables of Jesus are such a powerful tool for teaching God’s truth [Mark 12:1]? Also consider Matthew 13:10-17; Luke 14:7-11; and Luke 15:1-3.

    2. The background to Jesus’ parable in Mark 12:1-12 is likely Isaiah 5:1-7. Why are these two texts linked? What were the parallels historically, morally, and spiritually for the nation [cf. Psalm 80:1-19; Isaiah 3:14-15; and Ezekiel 19:10-14]?

    3. Was it reasonable of the vineyard owner to expect fruit from his tenants [Mark 12:1-2]? Why? How does this relate to our lives today [cf. Psalm 1:1-6; Matthew 3:7-10; and John 15:1-11]?

    4. Is Jesus’ portrayal of humanity true to life in this parable [Mark 12:3-5]? Are people capable of unprovoked violence and the mistreatment others? If so, how do you account for this kind of callous behaviour [cf. Genesis 6:11-13; Proverbs 1:10-19; and Romans 3:9-18]?

    5. The tenants of Jesus’ parable represented the Jewish religious authorities. How do their comments in Mark 12:7 expose their faulty reasoning and short-sightedness? Why do you think people make evil choices and assume no consequences will result [cf. Genesis 37:18-20; Psalm 94:1-23; and John 5:19-23]?

    6. What does the fact that Jesus referred to Himself as a rejected Cornerstone indicate to His followers how they will likely be treated by their contemporaries [cf. Mark 8:31-38; Acts 4:5-12; 1 Peter 2:4-8]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house on the rock. And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the rock.” (Jesus of Nazareth)
  • Jun 27, 2021Jesus ROCKS! – Deric Bartlett
    Jun 27, 2021
    Jesus ROCKS! – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Jesus ROCKS!' based on Mark 11:12-18 & 20-32.

    1. Jesus rocks _____________ (v. 1-11; 27-32)
    2. Jesus rocks _____________ (Lk 19:45,46)
    3. Jesus rocks _____________ (v. 12-14, 20-26)
    4. Jesus rocks _____________ (v.15-18)

    ICEBREAKER: What do you think you will be like when you are old, and how will you act?

    1. How do you account for the deterioration of the temple into a marketplace in Mark 11:15-16? What did this blasphemous behaviour indicate about the spiritual condition of the nation of Israel at that time [cf. Isaiah 29:13; Jeremiah 5:21-25; and Ezekiel 33:30-33]?
    2. We see a different side of Jesus in Mark 11:15-16. Why was He upset, and what do you learn about the character of God from His cleansing of the temple [cf. Psalm 2; Isaiah 61:1-2; and Matthew 13:36-43]?
    3. What do you learn about worship from Jesus’ teaching in Mark 11:17, especially from His quote of Isaiah 56:7 [cf. 1 Kings 8:27-30; Isaiah 2:3; and Acts 16:11-16]?
    4. What are some prayer principles you derive from Jesus’ response to Peter’s surprised reaction to the withered fig tree [Mark 11:22-24]? Also consider Matthew 17:20; Hebrews 11:6; and James 1:6-8.
    5. Why do you think Jesus linked answered prayer to the forgiveness of others in Mark 11:24-25? Examine Matthew 6:14; Matthew 18:23-35; and James 5:15 as well.
    6. What did Jesus clearly expose in the hearts of the religious leaders when He answered their questions about the source of His authority in Mark 11:27-33? How can we avoid their sin [cf. Matthew 21:32; Matthew 23:1-12; and John 8:39-47]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
    “If Bible Christianity is to survive the present world upheaval, we shall need to have a fresh revelation of the greatness and the beauty of Jesus...He alone can raise our cold hearts to rapture and restore again the art of true worship”. (A.W. Tozer)
  • Jun 20, 2021Hosanna in the Highest! – Deric Bartlett
    Jun 20, 2021
    Hosanna in the Highest! – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Hosanna in the Highest!' based on Mark 11:1-11.

    1.      His ___________ (v. 1)
    2.     His ___________ (v. 2-6)
    3.     His ___________ (v. 7-10)
    4.     His ___________ (v. 11)


    ICEBREAKER: What big problem do you think technology will solve next?

    1. What do you discover about Jesus’ nature in the unfolding of the events of Mark 11:1-6 that serves to calm your anxieties about the future [cf. Genesis 15:12-16; Psalm 139:1-12; and Daniel 2:27-30]?

    2. Mark 11:2 makes it clear the colt had never been ridden before. Yet Jesus sat on it without incident in Mark 11:7. What does this reveal about Jesus that prompts you to worship Him [cf. Genesis 1:24-25; Isaiah 11:1-9; and Jeremiah 27:5]?

    3. When the disciples threw their outer cloaks on the colt and Jesus sat on it, the prophecy of Zechariah 9:9 was fulfilled. What does this Old Testament prediction declare about Jesus’ character and His mission that gives you hope [cf. Isaiah 9:6-7; Jeremiah 23:5; and Philippians 2:5-11]?

    4. Mark 11:9 quotes from Psalm 118 which would have been the final song Jesus and His disciples would have sung together as part of their Passover celebration. Knowing this background, how does Psalm 118 inspire your worship and thanksgiving for Christ’s salvation [cf. Exodus 15:2; Psalm 18:46-50; and Isaiah 12:2]?

    5. What do the praises of the people in Mark 11:9-10 indicate about their expectations of Jesus? Were they accurate in their assessment of who He was and his mission? How does this impact your hope in the future [cf. Daniel 7:13-14; Matthew 24:30; and Revelation 1:7]?

    6. Why do you think Jesus was upset with the fig tree in Mark 11:12-14? Was He “hangry” (meaning, His hunger made Him touchy)? Did He not like figs? Or was there another, more profound reason? How does the mention of His disciples’ presence [v. 14] influence your answer [cf. Deuteronomy 11:16-17; Isaiah 5:1-7; and Luke 13:6-9]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “He [Jesus] has a right to interrupt your life. He is Lord. When you accepted Him as Lord, you gave Him the right to help Himself to your life anytime He wants.” (Henry Blackaby)
  • Jun 13, 2021What Do You Want From Jesus? – Deric Bartlett
    Jun 13, 2021
    What Do You Want From Jesus? – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'What Do You Want From Jesus?' based on Mark 10:46-52.

    1. How do you see ___________? V. 46
    2. How do you see ___________? V. 47
    3. How do you respond when ___________? V. 48-50
    4. What do you want ___________? V. 50-51
    5. What will you do when He gives you ___________? V. 52

    ICEBREAKER: What company or brand did you love until they betrayed your trust?

    1. Why do you think blindness is so frequently used in Scripture to describe people’s spiritual condition [Mark 10:46]? Consider also Psalm 146:8; Isaiah 6:9-10; and John 9:1-41 for more insights.

    2. What is the significance of the title “Son of David” that Bartimaeus used to call out to Jesus [Mark 10:47-48]? What does this indicate about Bartimaeus’ perception of Jesus’ identity [cf. Matthew 1:1; Matthew 12:22-23; and Mark 12:35-37]?

    3. Under what circumstances would someone plead “Have mercy on me!” [Mark 10:47-48]? Examine Job 19:21; Psalm 51:1; and Matthew 15:22 for more clues.

    4. What does the observation that some in the crowd rebuked Bartimaeus for crying out for Jesus’ attention reveal about their attitudes toward the unfortunate [Mark 10:48]? Do you think Bartimaeus was the only “blind” person in this story [cf. Luke 18:9-14; Romans 12:3; and Philippians 2:3]?
    5. What principles of prayer do you pick up from the interaction between Jesus and Bartimaeus in Mark 10:51 that have the potential to deepen your prayer life [cf. Romans 8:15; Galatians 4:6; and Philippians 4:6-7]?

    6. What is the relationship between faith and prayer [Mark 10:52]? How do they work together to accomplish God’s will for our lives [cf. Matthew 8:10; Matthew 9:22; and James 1:5-8]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Faith is like radar that sees through the fog-the reality of things at a distance that the human eye cannot see.” (Corrie Ten Boom)
  • Jun 6, 2021The Servant’s Cup – Deric Bartlett
    Jun 6, 2021
    The Servant’s Cup – Deric Bartlett

    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'The Servant's Cup' based on Mark 10:32-45.

    1.   We need ________:  v. 32-34

    2.   We need ________:  v. 35-41

    3.   We need ________:  v. 42-45

    ICEBREAKER: Would you rather watch a movie on your TV at home or on the big screen in the theatre? Why?


    1.    According to the context, what was it about Jesus’ demeanour that caused His disciples and the others following Him to be amazed and afraid [Mark 10:32]? What was Jesus determined to accomplish for the world [cf. Romans 5:8; 1 John 4:9-10; and Revelation 1:5-6]?

     

     

    2.     Jesus predicted exactly what was going to happen to Him after He arrived in Jerusalem [Mark 10:33-34]. What does this reveal about Him that helps you face trying circumstances today [cf. Mark 8:31; Mark 9:31; and Luke 18:31-33]?

    3.     What does James and John’s request in Mark 10:35-37 show about them, and how does that contrast with Jesus’ mission [cf. Galatians 5:26; Philippians 2:3; and 1 Peter 5:5]?

    4.     All the disciples seemed to view each other as rivals as evidenced by their reactions to James and John’s request of Jesus [Mark 10:41]. What are the dangers of viewing others in this manner [cf. 1 Corinthians 1:10-11; 1 Corinthians 3:3; and Philippians 1:15-17]?

    5.     Jesus contrasts His way with the world’s way in Mark 10:42-44. These opposing views persist today. What are the characteristics of each perspective? Can you identify various examples of each [cf. Daniel 4:34-37; Luke 9:46-48; and 1 Peter 5:2-3]?

    6.     How does Jesus’ mission statement of Mark 10:45 influence how you conduct yourself in the world [cf. John 13:3-17; Galatians 5:13; and 1 Timothy 2:6]?

    7.     What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Think about the way God rules. He doesn’t do it by sending in the tanks. He does it by calling servants.” (N.T. Wright)

     

  • May 30, 2021Treasure in Heaven – Deric Bartlett
    May 30, 2021
    Treasure in Heaven – Deric Bartlett
     This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Treasure in Heaven' based on Mark 10:17-31.

    1.   You can be sincerely wrong about ____________ (v.17-20)
    2.   You need Jesus to expose the ___________________ (v. 21-25)
    3.   You need _______________ to give you “eternal life” (v. 26-27)
    4.   You need to __________________ and follow Jesus (v. 28-31)


    1. What details in Mark 10:17 indicate this man’s question was sincere? How does his question reveal a fundamental flaw in his perception of salvation [cf. Matthew 19:16; Mark 10:15; and John 3:16]?
    2. In answering the man’s question, what did Jesus recite in Mark 10:19? What part did He allude to in Mark 10:21 that was the stumbling point for the man spiritually [cf. Exodus 20:3-17; Matthew 6:24; and 1 John 2:15-17]?
    3. Why do you think wealth is such a barrier to entering into God’s kingdom [Mark 10:23]? Consider also Luke 12:13-21; 1 Timothy 6:9-10; and James 5:1-6.
    4. What do you learn about salvation from Jesus’ comment that “it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a (sewing) needle than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God” [Mark 10:25]? Examine Proverbs 11:28; Matthew 23:25-26; and 1 Timothy 6:17-19 for more insights.
    5. Jesus’ comments on the rich in Mark 10:23-27 completely shocked His disciples [Mark 10:24, 26]. What misconceptions of wealth confused the disciples regarding the nature of salvation [cf. Psalm 49; Psalm 73; and Proverbs 18:11]?
    6. According to Jesus in Mark 10:29-31, what are the costs to following Him? What are the rewards? In your estimation, are the rewards worth the costs [cf. Matthew 6:33; Luke 9:23-26; and Hebrews 10:32-39]?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
    “Water is useful to the ship and helps it to sail better to the haven, but let the water get into the ship, if it is not pumped out, it drowns the ship. So riches are useful and convenient for our passage. We sail more comfortably with them through the troubles of this world; but if the water gets into the ship, if love of riches gets into the heart, then we are drowned by them.” (Thomas Watson)
  • May 23, 2021Jesus Teaching About Divorce Pt 2 – Deric Bartlett
    May 23, 2021
    Jesus Teaching About Divorce Pt 2 – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Jesus Teaching About Divorce Pt 2' based on Mark 10:1-16. He adds some perspective from John 1:16-18.

    ICEBREAKER: What well-known person does the most good for the world?

    1. What are the specifics of the Mosaic law that governed divorce in Deuteronomy 24:1-4? According to v. 4, why could her first husband not marry her again? Why does this matter [cf. Isaiah 24:5; Jeremiah 3:1; and Hosea 1:2]?
     
    2. Proverbs 5 provides excellent advice on how to divorce-proof your marriage. What principles are given to help you prioritize your marriage [cf. Proverbs 9:13-18; Ecclesiastes 9:9; and 1 Corinthians 7:1-7]?
     
    3. According to Malachi 2:13-16, God views marriage as a covenant. What does this mean, and what are the consequences of breaking it through divorce [cf. Isaiah 54:6; Jeremiah 9:2; and 1 Timothy 3:2]?
     
    4. Jesus contradicted the popular teachings of the rabbis of His day in Matthew 5:31-32. They were looking for loopholes; He was looking at the heart. What do you learn about the seriousness of marriage from Jesus’ comments in Matthew 5:32 [cf. Luke 16:18; Romans 7:1-3; and 1 Corinthians 7:10-11]?
     
    5. The Apostle Paul used the mystery of the marriage union to illustrate Christ’s relationship with His Church [Ephesians 5:21-33]. According to these verses, what is the wife’s main responsibility? What is the husband’s main responsibility? What does this look like in practical terms [cf. Proverbs 24:3-4; Proverbs 31:10-31; and Colossians 3:18-19]?
     
    6. We know the Apostle Peter was married [cf. Matthew 8:14]. What principles does he share from his marriage that are applicable to yours today [1 Peter 3:1-7]? How do the following verses [1 Peter 3:8-12] apply within the context of a godly biblical marriage [cf. Matthew 5:5; 1 Thessalonians 4:3-8; and 1 Timothy 2:8-10]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
    “Great marriages don’t happen by luck or by accident. They are the result of a consistent investment of time, thoughtfulness, forgiveness, affection, prayer, mutual respect, and a rock-solid commitment between a husband and a wife.” (Dave Willis)
  • May 16, 2021Jesus Teaching About Divorce – Deric Bartlett
    May 16, 2021
    Jesus Teaching About Divorce – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'Jesus Teaching About Divorce' based on Mark 10:1-16.

    1. ____________________ is as old as time: v. 1-2
    2. ____________________ are for the hard-hearted: v. 3-5
    3. The ____________________ plan still stands: v. 6-12
    4. Children need to be ___________________ by Jesus: v. 13-16

    ICEBREAKER: What kind of physical exercise activities do you like doing?

    1. The people of Jesus’ day were just as confused about controversial topics as people are today. How did Jesus combat cultural confusion that helps us set a clear course in our cultural moment [cf. Matthew 7:28-29; John 7:14-19; and 2 Timothy 4:1-5]?

    2. Mark 10:2 was a “loaded question”. Jesus had just entered the territory governed by Herod Antipas who had earlier beheaded John the Baptist over this same issue. And there was a crowd in attendance as well [Mark 10:1]. From this text, what is an effective way of handling such tests [cf. Matthew 22:18; 1 Corinthians 10:13; and Revelation 2:2-3]?

    3. When Jesus responded to the question in Mark 10:3, where was He directing them? Why is this an important step to answer hostile critics [Psalm 19:7-11; 2 Timothy 3:16-17; and 2 Peter 1:19-21]?

    4. What is the root of the divorce problem according to Jesus in Mark 10:5? How does knowing this help us address relational breakdowns [cf. Ezekiel 3:7; Malachi 2:13-16; and Ephesians 5:21-33]?

    5. What timeless principles of marriage do you pick up from Jesus’ comments in Mark 10:6-9 [cf. Genesis 2:18-25; Colossians 3:18-19; and 1 Peter 3:1-7]?

    6. Matthew 19:10 records the disciples’ alarmed reaction to Jesus’ conclusions on divorce and remarriage in Mark 10:10-12. How does this teaching of Jesus affect you? How does God’s view of marriage relationships contrast with our culture’s views [cf. Matthew 5:32; Luke 16:18; and Romans 7:2-3]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “In sharp contrast with our culture, the Bible teaches that the essence of marriage is a sacrificial commitment to the good of the other. That means that love is more fundamentally action than emotion.” (Tim Keller)
  • May 9, 2021The Queen of the Castle – Deric Bartlett
    May 9, 2021
    The Queen of the Castle – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Deric shares a special Mother's Day message titled 'The Queen of the Castle" based on the book of Esther.

    1. The ________ of Esther
    2. The _______ of Esther

    ICEBREAKER: What life lessons have you learned from your mother?

    1. What do you learn about Esther’s background from Esther 2:5-11? How does her less than ideal life circumstances encourage you to face your own [cf. Genesis 50:19-21; James 1:2-4; and 1 Peter 1:6-9]?

    2. How was Esther’s character portrayed in Esther 2:9, 10, and 15? Why are these desirable attributes to cultivate in life [cf. Proverbs 15:22; Proverbs 19:20; and Proverbs 23:22-23]?

    3. Esther was willing to give others credit instead of being self-serving [Esther 2:21-23]. Why is this such an undervalued characteristic today? What good could possibly from turning the spotlight on others [cf. Roman 16:1-2; 1 Corinthians 16:15-18; and Philippians 2:25-30]?

    4. Esther could have tried to save herself by keeping her nationality hidden. However, she chose, at the bidding of Mordecai, to identify with her endangered people. How does her act of courage and self-sacrifice inspire you to face your fears [cf. 1 Samuel 17:41-51; Daniel 6:19-23; and 1 Peter 3:18]?

    5. How do the events of Esther 5-7 – the first dinner, the humiliation of Haman, the second dinner, and the ultimate downfall of Haman – illustrate the relationship between divine sovereignty and human responsibility [cf. Jeremiah 18:1-11; Acts 13:48; and Philippians 2:12-13]?

    6. Esther decided to petition the king by declaring her solidarity with the people of God [Esther 7:3-4]. Do you value the community of faith? If so, how do you demonstrate it [cf. 1 Corinthians 12:26; Hebrews 10:32-39; and Hebrews 13:1-3]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “When Eve was brought unto Adam, he became filled with the Holy Spirit, and gave her the most sanctified, the most glorious of appellations. He called her Eve, that is to say, the Mother of All. He did not style her wife, but simply mother, mother of all living creatures. In this consists the glory and the most precious ornament of woman.” (Martin Luther)
  • May 2, 2021Be Strong & Courageous – Max Oates
    May 2, 2021
    Be Strong & Courageous – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Max shares a message titled "Be Strong & Courageous" based on Joshua 1 as he says farewell.

    ICEBREAKER: What workers have the worst jobs?

    1. One of the key attributes of leadership is the ability to accurately describe reality. How do you see that principle at work in the LORD’s first sentence of Joshua 1:2? Why was this such a significant statement of reality for the people of Israel [cf. Deuteronomy 32:48-52; Deuteronomy 34:10-12; and Hebrews 3:5]?

    2. What would be required of the people of Israel to experience the fulfillment of God’s promises to them [Joshua 1:2-4]? Consider also Deuteronomy 9:23-24; Deuteronomy 31:7-8; and Hebrew 3:7-19.

    3. Why did the LORD promise His continued presence as the Israelites prepared to enter the land [Joshua 1:5]? How does this encourage you to trust God and obey Him as you face the challenges in your life [cf. Deuteronomy 31:6; Isaiah 41:10; and Hebrews 13:5-6]?

    4. Why do you think the LORD told Joshua to be “strong and courageous” three times in Joshua 1:6, 7, and 9? What was about to happen in their immediate future that necessitated courage? How does this influence your approach to your current situation [1 Samuel 17:41-47; 2 Chronicles 14:9-15; and 2 Chronicles 32:1-8]?

    5. Joshua 1:1-9 is full of commands from the LORD and promises by the LORD. How do God’s promises help us keep His commands [cf. Exodus 15:26; Deuteronomy 28:1-14; and Colossians 3:1-4]?

    6. What does it look like to meditate on the Word of God day and night [Joshua 1:8]? What does God promise to those who do so [cf. Psalm 1:1-3; Psalm 119:9-11; and Colossians 3:16]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Meditation is simply talking to God about His Word with a desire that your life and those you pray for come into agreement with it.” (William Thrasher)
  • Apr 25, 2021God’s Heart for Children – Deric Bartlett
    Apr 25, 2021
    God’s Heart for Children – Deric Bartlett
    This week, Pastor Deric continues the series "The Gospel of Mark: Servanthood and Sacrifice in a Selfie World" with a message titled 'God's Heart for Children' based on selected passages from Mark 9 & 10.

    1. ______________ as God sees them (9:14-29)
    2. ____________________ as Jesus illustrated (9:33-37)
    3.  ________________  from temptation (9:42-50)
    4. ____________________ to Jesus (10:13-16)


    ICEBREAKER:
    What is your favourite international food?

    1. What divine characteristics did Jesus demonstrate in the healing of the demonized boy in Mark 9:14-27? How do these encourage you in your times of crisis [cf. Psalm 103:13; Colossians 2:15; and Hebrews 2:14-15]?

    2. The word translated “received” in Mark 9:37 is a term of hospitality. Children in ancient times had little significance. How did Jesus’ actions and words in Mark 9:36-37 challenge the prevailing attitude regarding the value of children [cf. Psalm 131:1-3; Ephesians 6:1-4; and Colossians 3:20-21]?

    3. Why do you think Jesus was particularly harsh in His condemnation of those who cause “one of these little ones who believe in me to sin” [Mark 9:42]? Examine also Proverbs 28:10; Luke 17:1-4; and Romans 14:13-23.

    4. What principles for dealing with temptation to sin do you pick up from Jesus’ instruction to cut off various body parts if they cause you to sin [Mark 9:43, 45, 47]? Consider also 1 Corinthians 10:13; James 1:13-15; and 1 John 2:15-17.

    5. The contrast between Jesus’ approach to young children and His disciples’ could not be starker [Mark 10:13]. What does this tell you about Jesus? What does this tell you about His disciples [cf. Genesis 33:5; 1 Samuel 1:26-28; and Psalm 127:3-5]?

    6. What is it about a child that makes him/her the ultimate example of how to enter God’s kingdom [Mark 10:15]? Look up John 1:12; Romans 8:14-17; and Galatians 3:25-26 for more insights.

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “Now, as always, God discloses Himself to “babes” and hides Himself in thick darkness from the wise and the prudent. We must simplify our approach to Him. We must strip down to essentials (and they will be found to be blessedly few). We must put away all effort to impress, and come with the guileless candor of childhood. If we do this, without doubt God will quickly respond.” (A.W. Tozer)
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