Sermons

Jan 19, 2020
Breaking The Surface – Brad Lehman
Series: One off
This week, Pastor Brad shares some tips on how to improve your prayer life titled 'Breaking the Surface' based on Acts 4:23-31.
 
Questions:
 
ICEBREAKER: What was your favourite vehicle that you’ve owned?
 
1. The context for Acts 4:23-31 began in Acts 3:1. What was the backstory that instigated this prayer? What was noticeably different about the early Christians, and what caused the change [cf. Mark 5:18-19; Luke 19:7-10; John 4:28-29]?
 
2. How did these early believers begin their prayer in Acts 4:24? Why is worshiping God – rehearsing Who He is and what He has done – such a priority in prayer? Consult also 2 Kings 19:14-19; Nehemiah 9:5b-15; and Isaiah 6:1-7.
 
3. What do you learn about the value of the Bible as an aid to prayer from Acts 4:25-26? What are the benefits of praying Scripture [cf. Psalm 19:7-11; Matthew 6:9-13; 2 Timothy 3:14-17]?
 
4. The prayer of these early Christians acknowledged the evil perpetrated by Jesus’ enemies [Acts 4:27]. Yet, they were confident God sovereignly superintended everything for His purposes [Acts 4:28]. How does their confidence in the Lord inspire you in your life challenges [cf. Acts 2:23-24; Romans 8:28; Ephesians 1:11-12]?
 
5. These early Christians did not pray for deliverance from persecution but boldness in persecution [Acts 4:29]. What does this tell you about the purpose and power of prayer [cf. Acts 4:13; Philippians 1:12-14; 1Thessalonians 2:1-2]?
 
6. Notice the order of the events in Acts 4:31 – prayer, God’s presence, empowerment, and mission. What do we learn about ministry and mission from this order [Acts 9:17-22; Acts 11:23-26; Ephesians 5:17-20]?
 
7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
 
“The right way to pray is to stretch out our hands and ask of One who we know has the heart of a Father.” (Dietrich Bonhoeffer)
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  • Jan 19, 2020Breaking The Surface – Brad Lehman
    Jan 19, 2020
    Breaking The Surface – Brad Lehman
    Series: One off
    This week, Pastor Brad shares some tips on how to improve your prayer life titled 'Breaking the Surface' based on Acts 4:23-31.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What was your favourite vehicle that you’ve owned?
     
    1. The context for Acts 4:23-31 began in Acts 3:1. What was the backstory that instigated this prayer? What was noticeably different about the early Christians, and what caused the change [cf. Mark 5:18-19; Luke 19:7-10; John 4:28-29]?
     
    2. How did these early believers begin their prayer in Acts 4:24? Why is worshiping God – rehearsing Who He is and what He has done – such a priority in prayer? Consult also 2 Kings 19:14-19; Nehemiah 9:5b-15; and Isaiah 6:1-7.
     
    3. What do you learn about the value of the Bible as an aid to prayer from Acts 4:25-26? What are the benefits of praying Scripture [cf. Psalm 19:7-11; Matthew 6:9-13; 2 Timothy 3:14-17]?
     
    4. The prayer of these early Christians acknowledged the evil perpetrated by Jesus’ enemies [Acts 4:27]. Yet, they were confident God sovereignly superintended everything for His purposes [Acts 4:28]. How does their confidence in the Lord inspire you in your life challenges [cf. Acts 2:23-24; Romans 8:28; Ephesians 1:11-12]?
     
    5. These early Christians did not pray for deliverance from persecution but boldness in persecution [Acts 4:29]. What does this tell you about the purpose and power of prayer [cf. Acts 4:13; Philippians 1:12-14; 1Thessalonians 2:1-2]?
     
    6. Notice the order of the events in Acts 4:31 – prayer, God’s presence, empowerment, and mission. What do we learn about ministry and mission from this order [Acts 9:17-22; Acts 11:23-26; Ephesians 5:17-20]?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The right way to pray is to stretch out our hands and ask of One who we know has the heart of a Father.” (Dietrich Bonhoeffer)
  • Jan 12, 2020The Elephant in the Room – Deric Bartlett
    Jan 12, 2020
    The Elephant in the Room – Deric Bartlett
    Pastor Deric continues the series 'No Turning Back' with a message titled 'The Elephant in the Room', based on Hebrews 6:4-12.
     
    Questions:
     
    ICEBREAKER: What has taken you the longest to get good or decent at?
     
    1. The little term “for” at the start of Hebrews 6:4 is significant because it looks back to Hebrews 5:11-6:3. The author addressed the need for spiritual progress, not stagnation, or worse, retreat. Why is Christian maturity so necessary to spiritual health [cf. Luke 8:14; Ephesians 4:13-15; Colossians 1:27-29]?
     
    2. Does Hebrews 6:4-5 describe a genuine believer in Jesus? Examine the use of these key terms in Hebrews: “enlightened” [10:32]; “tasted” [2:9]; “shared” [3:1,14]; and “miracles” [2:4] in your response.
     
    3. According to Hebrews 6:6, apostasy is a real danger. What are the consequences listed in this text of falling away from following Jesus [cf. Luke 8:13; 1 Timothy 1:19; 1 Timothy 4:1-3; Hebrews 3:12]?
     
    4. Hebrews 6:7-8 begins with another “for”, leading to an illustration that clarifies the author’s point in 6:4-6. How does this example from agriculture help you understand this warning [cf. Matthew 3:7-10; Matthew 7:15-20; Luke 8:13-15; John 15:6]?
     
    5. As a good pastor, following a stern warning, the author went on to encourage his readers [Hebrews 6:9-10]. What had he seen in them, according to this text, that gave him reason for optimism [cf. Colossians 1:3-8; 2 Thessalonians 1:3-4; Revelation 3:7-13]?
     
    6. The term “sluggish” [Hebrews 6:12] is the same term translated “dull” of hearing in Hebrews 5:11. What are some signs of “spiritual sluggishness” listed in Hebrews 5:11-6:3 that we should avoid? What are some remedies to keep us moving forward, particularly in Hebrews 6:11-12, as well as Romans 12:11; Hebrews 13:7; and James 1:2-4?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
  • Jan 5, 202020/20 Vision – Deric Bartlett
    Jan 5, 2020
    20/20 Vision – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Deric sets our vision for the year 2020 with a message titled "20/20 Vision"

    Questions:

    ICEBREAKER: What are you planning to practice this year to make it your best year ever spiritually?

    1. The Great Commission of Matthew 28:18-20 is key to understanding City Centre’s reason for existing. Who [Matthew 3:16-17] is commissioning who [Matthew 10:2]? What is the mission [Acts 1:8]? How is it to be done [Matthew 13:36-43]? What is the promise [Matthew 1:21-23] and hope [Revelation 22:1-5]?

    2. Christianity is designed to be a relationship with God, not just a religion. Spending time with God fosters that relationship. What are your daily practices that prioritize alone time with God? Consider Psalm 5:3; Psalm 42:1-2; Luke 5:16; and Acts 17:11 in your thoughts.

    3. What is the purpose of weekly corporate worship, and why is it so important? Include Psalm 95:1-7; Acts 13:1-2; and Revelation 5:6-14 in your response.

    4. Following Christ is more than a solitary pursuit. We are created for community. What are the benefits of walking with Jesus alongside others [cf. Acts 2:42-47; Colossians 3:12-17; and Hebrews 10:24-25]?

    5. Christians are saved to serve, for that was the example of our Lord [cf. Mark 10:45; Luke 22:27]. How does serving others benefit us as well as the entire body of Christ [cf. Galatians 5:13-14; Ephesians 4:11-16; and 1 Peter 4:10]?

    6. Throughout church history, the Great Commission has too often collapsed into the Great Omission. Why is mission so dear to our Heavenly Father’s heart, and what are we able to do to accomplish it together? Reflect on Romans 16:25-27; Galatians 4:4-5; and 1 John 4:9-10 for further insights.

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

    “All God’s giants have been weak men who did great things for God because they reckoned on God being with them.” (Hudson Taylor

  • Dec 29, 2019The Marks of Maturity – Deric Bartlett
    Dec 29, 2019
    The Marks of Maturity – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series 'No turning Back' with a message titled 'The Marks of Maturity' from Hebrews 5:11-6:3.
     
    Questions:
     
    1. What may cause a person to “become dull of hearing” [Hebrews 5:11]? Study Isaiah 6:9-10; Ezekiel 12:2; John 8:42-44; and 2 Peter 3:16 for further insights.]
    2. According to the writer of Hebrews, every believer must mature to the point of being able to teach others [Hebrews 5:12]. What are some obstacles to overcome on the road to spiritual maturity [cf. Luke 8:14; 1 Corinthians 3:1-4; and Ephesians 4:13-14]?
    3. What is “the word of righteousness” [Hebrews 5:13], and why is it so vitally relevant to our modern world? Consider also Matthew 5:6; Romans 1:17; and 1 Peter 2:24 in your response.
    4. Why is discernment so necessary for believers to become mature [Hebrews 5:14]? How can believers become more discerning [cf. 1 Kings 3:9; Romans 12:2; 1 Thessalonians 5:21]?
    5. Hebrews 6:1-2 outlines foundational Christian teachings according to the early church. What are these teachings, and why are they so foundational? Meditate on Acts 20:21; Galatians 2:16; Colossians 2:12; 1 Timothy 4:14; 1 Corinthians 15:12-28; and Acts 17:30-31 for more ideas.
    6. If you were helping to establish and disciple a young believer in the Christian faith, what are the foundational teachings you would focus on? Would you follow this list in Hebrews 6:1-2? If not, what would you change, and why?
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
  • Dec 22, 2019A Humble Response to Christmas – Deric Bartlett
    Dec 22, 2019
    A Humble Response to Christmas – Deric Bartlett
    Pastor Deric concludes his survey of the Advent season with a message based on Luke 1:37-38.

    Ice Breaker: What was your all-time favourite Christmas gift as a child?
    1. Mary was “greatly troubled” by the angel’s greeting in Luke 1:28-29. Putting yourself in her “sandals”, how would you have felt? Why? What was so troubling about the angel’s greeting [cf. Judges 6:12; Matthew 1:20; and Matthew 2:13]?
     
    2. Reflect on the description of Mary’s Son in Luke 1:31-33. What do you learn about Him that sets Him apart from all others? Why is worshiping Him the only legitimate response [cf. Isaiah 7:14; Isaiah 9:6-7; Matthew 1:21]?
     
    3. How do you explain the difference between Mary’s question in Luke 1:34 that receives an answer from the angel, and Zechariah’s question in Luke 1:18-20 that receives a rebuke? What do you learn about a fitting response to God’s Word [cf. Luke 1:45; Romans 10:17; Hebrews 11:6]?
     
    4. Nothing is impossible for God [Luke 1:37] makes a bold call for faith. It occurs several times in Scripture [Some examples: Genesis 18:14; Matthew 17:20; Luke 18:27]. Why is this true? How are you living this out in practical terms?
     
    5. What do you understand about Mary’s character and heart from her statement in Luke 1:38? What makes her such a marvellous model for all faithful followers of Jesus [Luke 1:46-55; Luke 2:19]?
     
    6. God’s plan for Mary’s pregnancy completely derailed her life plans and placed her in a precarious predicament. Even Joseph, her betrothed, required a divine dream to alert him to the unique situation [cf. Matthew 1:18-25]. What does this reveal about who God is and His right to direct our lives?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “The virgin birth is posted on guard at the door of the mystery of Christmas; and none of us must think of hurrying past it. It stands on the threshold of the New Testament, blatantly supernatural, defying our rationalism, informing us that all that follows belongs to the same order as itself and that if we find it offensive there is no point in proceeding further.” (Donald Macleod, The Person of Christ)
  • Dec 15, 2019A Fitting Response to Christmas – Deric Bartlett
    Dec 15, 2019
    A Fitting Response to Christmas – Deric Bartlett
    Pastor Deric continues his survey of the responses to Advent with a message called "A Fitting Response to Christmas", focusing on Luke 2:15-20. 1. Notice the related contrasts of “by night” [Luke 2:8] and “the glory of the Lord shone” [Luke 2:9], along with “fear” [Luke 2:9] and the exercise of faith by the shepherds [Luke 2:15]. What does this imply about the relationship between darkness and light [cf. John 1:5; Acts 26:18; 1 John 2:8]? How do we apply the antidote to fear [cf. Psalm 56:11; Isaiah 12:2; John 14:1]?
    2. It must have been bewildering for Mary and Joseph to have to settle for humble lodgings [Luke 2:7]. However, the Baby in the manger was the specific sign given to the shepherds [Luke 2:12, 16]. How reassuring the shepherds’ report must have been for them, indicating they were exactly where God wanted them to be. How does this story reassure you in your difficult circumstances [cf. Genesis 50:20 Romans 8:28; Philippians 1:12-14]?
    3. Reflect on the gospel as described in Luke 2:10-14 What do you learn about it? Who is it centred on? Who is it aimed at? Who benefits? What are its effects or results? Examine for further insights Matthew 9:35-38; Romans 1:16-17; and 1 Corinthians 15:1-11.
    4. As the shining glory faded and the angelic song drifted away, the shepherds were left with a decision [Luke 2:15]. What do you learn from their response in Luke 2:15-17 that is worth imitating? Find more inspiration in Mark 3:35; Romans 1:5; James 2:14-26; and 1 John 5:1-5.
    5. In Luke 2:8-20, the angel addressed a group of shepherds. What is the value of community when it comes to exercising faith and responding in obedience to God’s Word? Consult also Acts 2:42; Acts 24:23-31; and Colossians 3:12-17.
    6. The angels communicated good news to the shepherds [Luke 2:10], who in turn shared the good news with others [Luke 2:18, 20]. What does this pattern reveal about living as an everyday missionary who shares the faith? Meditate on Matthew 28:19-20; Acts 1:8; and 2 Timothy 4:5 for more motivation.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
  • Dec 8, 2019The Wise Response to Christmas – Deric Bartlett
    Dec 8, 2019
    The Wise Response to Christmas – Deric Bartlett
     Matthew 2:1-12
     
    1. From what you know, what were “the days of Herod the king” like politically, socially and spiritually [Matthew 2:1]? Look up Matthew 2:13-18; Matthew 27:27-31; John 11:48; and Galatians 4:4 for further insights into the brutality and brokenness of the world at Jesus’ birth. How does this compare with our world today?
     
    2. What do you learn about worship from the words and actions of the wise men throughout this story [Matthew 2:1-12]? Examine also Isaiah 6:1-7; John 4:21-24; and John 9:35-39 for additional worship inspiration.
     
    3. If you were a “spiritual heart surgeon”, what would be your diagnosis of King Herod’s heart [Matthew 2:3-8; 13-18]? What would be his prognosis if left untreated? What treatment would you prescribe? Consult also Isaiah 6:9-10; Jeremiah 17:9; Mark 7:17-23; and 2 Corinthians 4:4.
     
    4. Preoccupation and busyness fosters indifference to God’s working in our lives. The religious leaders quoted Scripture [Matthew 2:4-6; cf. Micah 5:2] but missed out on the opportunity to welcome and worship the new born King with the wise men. How do we combat indifferent attitudes? Consider also Matthew 13:22; Matthew 23:23; and Revelation 3:14-22.
     
    5. What does the quote from Micah 5:2 tell us about “he who has been born king of the Jews” [Matthew 2:6]? How does this ancient prophetic word inspire your worship of Christ today? Reflect also on Isaiah 7:14; Isaiah 9:6-7; and Isaiah 11:1-10.
     
    6. The wise men brought gifts to worship the newborn King [Matthew 2:11]. Why does gift-giving often accompany worship? Notice a similar connection in Deuteronomy 16:16; 2 Samuel 24:24; and Philippians 4:15-19. What are you planning to give as an act of worship to your King this Christmas?
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Worship is an act of war against the enemy of our hearts.” (Holley Gerth)
  • Dec 1, 2019Jesus, the Perfect High Priest – Deric Bartlett
    Dec 1, 2019
    Jesus, the Perfect High Priest – Deric Bartlett
    Series: One off
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Jesus, the Perfect High Priest focusing on Hebrews 5:1-10.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 5:1-10
     

    Ice Breaker: Are you more productive at night or in the morning? Do you think it’s possible to change and get used to another schedule?

    1. According to Hebrews 5:1, what qualifies a person to serve as an Old Testament high priest? How does this help us understand Christ’s high priestly role, and how does it encourage you? Check also Romans 8:1-4; 2 Corinthians 5:21; and 1 Peter 2:24-25.

    2. Hebrews 5:2-4 speak of an effective high priest’s empathy for the people he represents before God. How does Jesus measure up, and surpass, such lofty standards? Also look at Matthew 9:35-38; Luke 7:11-17; and John 11:32-35.

    3. Although the texts quoted in Hebrews 5:5-6 speak of the exalted position of God’s Anointed King [Psalm 2:7; Psalm 110:4], Jesus lived on earth as a humble servant [cf. Matthew 21:5; Luke 2:4-7; Philippians 2:3-11]. How does this portrayal of Jesus amaze and inspire you?

    4. How does Jesus’ model of a prayer life instruct and inspire your prayer life [Hebrews 5:7]? Consult also Luke 5:16; Luke 11:1-4; and Luke 22:39-46.

    5. How do you understand Hebrews 5:8? What is the relationship between a child of God and the purpose of suffering [cf. Matthew 5:10-12; Romans 5:3-5; Philippians 4:10-13; and James 1:2-4]?

    6. What is the role of obedience in Christ’s experience as well as the believer’s experience [Hebrews 5:8-9]? How does His obedience motivate your obedience [cf. Romans 1:5; Romans 2:6-8; and Romans 6:15-19]?

    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?

  • Nov 24, 2019Great Expectations – Max Oates
    Nov 24, 2019
    Great Expectations – Max Oates
    Series: One off
    1. Two times David writes he “waits in silence for God” in this psalm [Psalm 62:1 & 5]. What does that look like? Does it mean do nothing, or is there some activity we must engage in? Consult also Psalm 27:14; Psalm 130:5-6; and Isaiah 40:28-31.
     
    2. Why does David use the images of a rock, a refuge, and a fortress [Psalm 62:2, 6-8]? Why were these images so meaningful to him [cf. 1 Samuel 23:24-29; 1 Samuel 30:6; 2 Samuel 5:17]? How do these images help you through life’s difficulties?
     
    3. David’s experience seems to mirror today. The current climate of our culture is characterized by mean-spiritedness. Everyone seems angry and personally offended by opposing viewpoints, resulting in yelling past one another, especially in social media. Have you ever experienced Psalm 62:3-4? Is there a better way to respond [ cf. Galatians 5:15; Ephesians 4:25-32; and James 1:19-21]?
     
    4. Faith, love and hope are expressed in other words in Psalm 62:8. Why are these 3 expressions so central to believers’ lives, and how do they strengthen us in the middle of hardships? Also examine Romans 5:1-5; 1 Thessalonians 1:3 and 5:8 for more insights.
    5. Psalm 62:9 addresses our human tendency toward self-importance. In our “selfie” and “viral” age, God’s Word reminds us we are but a “breath”. How does this word picture influence your self-awareness and priorities [cf. Genesis 1:26-27; Psalm 8:3-8; Psalm 144:3-4; James 4:13-14; and 1 John 3:1-3]?
    6. The Bible warns us to not set our hears on temporary material things, especially if they are unjustly gained [Psalm 62:10]. How can we keep material possessions from possessing us? Reflect also on Ecclesiastes 5:10-20; Matthew 6:19-24; and  Hebrews 13:5.
     
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
  • Nov 17, 2019Our Great High Priest – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 17, 2019
    Our Great High Priest – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Our Great High Priest focusing on Hebrews 4:14-16
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 4: 14 - 16
    ICEBREAKER: What scene in a movie always gives you goosebumps every time you watch it?

    1. Why is it necessary for us to have Jesus, God’s Son, as our great high priest [Hebrews 4:14; cf. 2:17; 3:1]? What has He done for us that we could not do, and why does it matter? Consult also Matthew 26:64; John 14:1-4; John 20:17; and Titus 2:11-14.
    2. How are we to “hold fast to our confession” [Hebrews 4:14]? Look for clues in Matthew 28:9; Acts 4:1-22; Acts 5:27-33; 2 Thessalonians 2:15; Revelation 2:13; and Revelation 3:11.
    3. Why does it matter to you that Jesus, your high priest, is fully able to sympathize with your weaknesses [Hebrews 4:15]? What does this tell you about how much God loves you? See also Psalm 103:8-13; Isaiah 53:4-6; Matthew 4:2; John 4:6; John 19:28; and 2 Corinthians 5:21.
    4. Jesus faced temptation just like us, “yet without sin” [Hebrews 4:15]. How does this fact influence your perspective on temptation and your strategy to overcome it? Examine also Matthew 4:1-11; Matthew 26:36-46; and 1 Peter 2:21-25.
    5. The “throne of grace” may refer to the mercy-seat above the ark of the covenant in the Old Testament tabernacle and temple [cf. 2 Kings 19:15; 1 Chronicles 13:6; Psalm 99:1]. In any case, it points to the presence of God. Since Jesus, our high priest, has entered into God’s presence for us [Hebrew 4:14], what are we now able to do [Hebrews 4:16]? Reflect also on Isaiah 55:6-7; Matthew 7:7-11; Romans 5:1-2; and Philippians 4:6-7.
    6. Hebrews 4:16 promises God’s timely help just when needed. Why do we specifically need mercy and grace? Can you think of an instance when God came to your rescue at just the right time with just what you needed? See some biblical examples in Daniel 6:16-23; Matthew 8:23-27; and Matthew 14:28-33.
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “It seems to me that Jesus is qualified to sympathize, to understand, to provide encouragement, and to be depended on. Jesus is to be valued by his followers. Is not the incarnation of the Son of God and his corresponding trials while here not comforting to the wounded heart?...Run to Jesus with your wounded heart and encourage others to do the same; for he is exalted in his children’s weakness.” (Erik Raymond)
  • Nov 10, 2019Face to Face with Jesus – Phil Webb
    Nov 10, 2019
    Face to Face with Jesus – Phil Webb
    Series: One off
    This week Phil Webb preached a sermon titled Face to Face With Jesus focusing on Luke 18:18 - 29
     
    Questions
    Luke 18: 18 - 29
    ICEBREAKER: What takes a lot of time but is totally worth it?

    1. The story of the ruler’s question [Luke 18:18-30] follows immediately after Jesus welcomed little children [Luke 18:15-17]. What do you think of the ruler’s question [v. 18] in light of the preceding verse [v. 17], along with John 6:28-29; Acts 16:30-31, and Ephesians 2:8-10? Do you think his question was sincere? Why or why not?
    2. Why do you think Jesus introduced the 10 Commandments to assess the ruler’s spiritual condition [Luke 18:20-22]? How might you use them to share the gospel with unbelievers [cf. Romans 7:7-12; Romans 13:8-10; and Galatians 3:10-14]?
    3. What was the one thing the ruler lacked [Luke 18:22-23]? What do you think was going on in the ruler’s heart? What needed to happen for him to inherit eternal life [cf. John 3:15-17; 1 Timothy 1:15-16; and 1 John 5:10-13]?
    4. Is Jesus commanding all wealthy people to sell everything and distribute the proceeds to the poor in order to follow Him [Luke 18:22]? How should believers view wealth based on this text, as well as Ecclesiastes 5:10-20; Matthew 6:19-24; and 1 Timothy 6:5-10?
    5. How should wealthy believers relate to the poor based on Luke 18:22, as well as Proverbs 14:21 & 31; Luke 12:13-21; Acts 4:32-37; 1 Timothy 6:17-19; and James 2:1-13?
    6. A common misconception is that riches indicate favour while poverty indicates disfavour. Jesus appeared to discourage this wealthy ruler, much to the shock of those with Him [Luke 18:24-26]. According to Jesus, “then who can be saved” to experience God’s favour [Luke 18:27- 30]? Consult also Luke 18:9-14; Luke 19:1-10; and Acts 9:1-6, 17-22.
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “If we discover a desire within us that nothing in this world can satisfy, also we should begin to wonder if perhaps we were created for another world.” (C.S. Lewis)
  • Nov 3, 2019Good News About REST – Deric Bartlett
    Nov 3, 2019
    Good News About REST – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Good News About Rest focusing on Hebrews 4:1-13
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 4: 1 -13
    ICEBREAKER: What incredibly common thing have you never done?

    1. The term “rest” is central to this passage. Look up Genesis 2:2 (God’s rest after creation), Numbers 13-14 (the Promised Land rest), Psalm 95:7-11 (God’s rest still available in David’s day), and Hebrews 4:1, 10-11. Why is “rest” so important?
    2. Hearing the good news is a significant first step [Hebrews 4:2]. But faith needs to accompany it. Reread Numbers 13:25-14:10 and contrast the two opposite responses to the opportunity to enter the Promised Land. What do you notice about true faith?
    3. The future for God’s people is described as “rest” [Hebrews 4:3-11]. What do believers have to look forward to in God’s rest? Consult also Genesis 2:2-3; Exodus 20:11; Exodus 31:17; and Matthew 11:28-30.
    4. Entering into God’s rest depends on the condition of one’s heart [Hebrews 4:6-7]. A disobedient, hard heart hinders the experience of God’s rest. What specifically shows a disobedient, hard heart in this text, along with Isaiah 6:9-10; John 12:36-43; and Acts 19:8-10?
    5. The author of Hebrews referred to several Old Testament texts throughout Hebrews 3:7-4:10 before writing of the discerning power of the Word of God in Hebrews 4:12. From this text, as well as Psalm 19:7-14; 2 Timothy 3:16-17; and 1 Peter 1:22-25, what effect does God’s Word have on human hearts?
    6. Few today think seriously about having to give an account for their thoughts, attitudes and actions. But Hebrews 4:13 warns of the certainty of the day of judgment. Therefore, how should we live in light of our accountability before God? Examine 1 Chronicles 28:9; 2 Chronicles 6:30; Ecclesiastes 12:13-14; Romans 2:16; and 1 Corinthians 4:5 for further insights.
    7.What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “You have made us for Yourself, O Lord; and our heart is restless until it rests in You.” (Augustine)
  • Oct 27, 2019The Beautiful Strokes of God – Allan Gallant
    Oct 27, 2019
    The Beautiful Strokes of God – Allan Gallant
    Series: One off
    This week Allan Gallant preached a sermon titled The Beautiful Strokes of God focusing on Romans 8:28-29.
     
    Questions
    Romans 8:28 - 29
    ICEBREAKER: What is the most clever or funniest use of advertising you’ve seen?

    1. Romans 8:28 assures believers that “all things work together for good”. What does this tell you about the character and power of God? How does this assurance help you when times are tough [cf. Romans 5:3-5; 2 Corinthians 4:16-18; and James 1:2-4].
    2. What does it mean “to be conformed to the image of His Son” [Romans 8:29]? If this is God’s purpose for every believer’s life, how does this goal impact how we live [cf. 2 Corinthians 3:16-18; Ephesians 1:5; Ephesians 4:22-24]?
    3. Romans 8:31 tells us that no one can be against believers when God is for them. What is the greatest proof that God is for us, according to Romans 8:32? What promise can we hold on to in Romans 8:32 to help us through trying times [cf. Romans 4:24-25; Romans 5:6-8; Ephesians 5:1-2]?
    4. Romans 8:33-34 uses the word picture of a law court. In this context, who serves as the judge, the prosecuting attorney, the defence attorney, and the accused? How is the accused acquitted of all charges in this spiritual courtroom? Are you able to identify [cf. Isaiah 54:17; Zechariah 3:1-5; John 5:24; Romans 8:1]?
    5. How does Christ’s love for you enable you to be more than a conqueror despite the many and various difficulties of life [Romans 8:35-37]? Consult also Matthew 5:10; John 16:33; and 2 Corinthians 12:10.
    6. Are you completely convinced of God’s great love for you? Spend some quiet moments reflecting on each of the threats listed in Romans 8:38-39 that are no match for God’s amazing love for you. Include 1 Corinthians 3:21-23; 1 Corinthians 15:23-28, and Ephesians 1:20-23 in your response.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “God is completely sovereign. God is infinite in wisdom. God is perfect in love. God in His love always wills what is best for us. In His wisdom He always knows what is best, and in His sovereignty He has the power to bring it about.” (Jerry Bridges)
  • Oct 20, 2019The Hard Heart – Deric Bartlett
    Oct 20, 2019
    The Hard Heart – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled The Hard Heart focusing on Hebrews 3:7 - 19.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 3:7 - 19
    ICEBREAKER: When someone finds out what you do, or where you are from, what question do they always ask you?

    1. Hebrews 3:7-11 is a quote from Psalm 95:7-11 that reflects back on an incident when Israel grumbled against Moses and the Lord [cf. Numbers 17:1-7]. What prompted the complaints? Do you think they were valid? Have you ever been tempted to question the Lord during trying times?
    2. How does a person “harden” his/her “heart” [Hebrews 3:8]? What contributes to a hardened heart [cf. Exodus 17:1-7; Proverbs 28:14; Zechariah 7:12; Matthew 13:15; Romans 2:5]? What can be done to remedy this condition?
    3. Going astray in one’s heart is related in Hebrews 3:10 to not knowing the Lord’s “ways”. What are the Lord’s “ways”? Consult also Deuteronomy 8:5-10; Psalm 138 (especially verse 5); and Revelation 15:1-4.
    4. We are commanded to beware of an unbelieving heart [Hebrews 3:12]. Part of that defensive strategy is to enlist the help of other believers [Hebrews 3:13]. What should we include in our exhortations to one another from this text, as well as Acts 14:22; Romans 12:1-2; 1 Thessalonians 5:11; and Hebrews 10:24-25?
    5. What is “our original confidence” that we are to hold firm to the end [Hebrews 3:14]? Examine Luke 8:15; 1 Corinthians 15:1-11; and Hebrews 10:19-23 for more clarity.
    6. Hebrews 3:16-18 poses a series of questions to highlight the hard hearts and unbelief [Hebrews 3:15, 19] of the Exodus generation of Israel. Using the terms found in these verses, what do we need to watch out for so that our hearts remain “soft” to God’s voice? Include Deuteronomy 9:18; 1 Samuel 15:22-23; Psalm 106:6-43; and Ephesians 5:3-13 in your response.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Better a shattered heart than a hardened heart.” (Woodrow Kroll)
  • Oct 13, 2019Faithful – Deric Bartlett
    Oct 13, 2019
    Faithful – Deric Bartlett
    This week Pastor Deric continues the series No Turning Back with a sermon titled Faithful focusing on Hebrews 3:1 - 6.
     
    Questions
    Hebrews 3:1 - 6
    ICEBREAKER: What are you most thankful for on this Thanksgiving Day weekend?

    1. What is the “heavenly calling” we share in together in Hebrews 3:1? Consult Philippians 3:14; 2 Thessalonians 2:14; 2 Timothy 1:9; and 1 Peter 5:1, 10 for further insights. How does this hope encourage you today?
    2. We are commanded to “consider Jesus” in Hebrews 3:1. List the various titles and descriptions of our Saviour in Hebrews 3:1-6 and reflect on their significance in God’s plan of salvation, as well as the impact on your personal life.
    3. The term “faithful” and related phrases appear in Hebrews 3:1-6 at least 4-5 times, indicating, through repetition, a central theme of the text. Who are the ones called “faithful”, how do they demonstrate faithfulness, and what difference do their examples make? Also consider Numbers 12:1-8 (Moses); Psalm 100 (God); and Colossians 1:7 (church servant).
    4. Moses is a towering figure in the Old Testament Scriptures. In Hebrews 3:1-6, Moses and Jesus are compared and contrasted. According to this passage, in what ways are they similar? And in what ways is Jesus superior? Why do you think this matters?
    5. Hebrews 3:4 declares an absolute truth: God is the builder of all things. This impacts the household of faith that is being built in this text. But it also affects all of life. How does your understanding of God as Creator influence your worship and walk each day? Examine Genesis 1; Psalm 19:1-6; and Romans 1:18-25 to go deeper.
    6. Hebrews 3:6 contains the condition that if we are of God’s household of faith, we must hold fast our confidence and hope in Christ. How do you understand this “if” phrase, and how do you “hold fast” in practical ways? Use Matthew 10:22; Matthew 13:3-8, 18-23; Philippians 2:12-13; and Colossians 1:21-23 to gain further clarity.
    7. What did you find helpful or challenging about this Sunday’s message?
     
    “Everything about God is great, vast, incomparable. He never forgets, never fails, never falters, never forfeits His word. To every declaration of promise or prophecy the Lord has exactly adhered, every engagement of covenant or threatening He will make good.” (A.W. Pink)
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