Nov 2, 2014
Robbing God
Pastor Deric continues our current series entitled "Our Generous God" a Stewardship Series. This week his sermon is on Malachi 3:6-12 entitled "Robbing God."

Questions:
Please read Malachi 3:6-12.
1. In verse 7 leading up to our study passage, Malachi states that his people have “turned aside” from God’s statutes. What does turning away from God indicate about the spiritual state of the people of Judah? How serious is this to God? (see v.6) How do the people view their relationship with God? (v.7)

2. What charge does Malachi bring against the people of Judah? What were the circumstances within their country that should have tipped off the people about their broken relationship with God? (see v.10-11)

3. What does the phrase, “the whole nation” (v.9) tell us about the seriousness and the scope of the problem?

4. What is God’s command and promise to Judah? (v.10-11)
 
5. How is Malachi’s message fundamentally tied to God’s plan for all of the nations? (see Gen. 12:1-3)

6. What is the message that Malachi’s people need to grasp? What is the change that needs to be made and how is change brought about?
WatchNotesDownloadDateTitle
  • Nov 2, 2014Robbing God
    Nov 2, 2014
    Robbing God
    Pastor Deric continues our current series entitled "Our Generous God" a Stewardship Series. This week his sermon is on Malachi 3:6-12 entitled "Robbing God."

    Questions:
    Please read Malachi 3:6-12.
    1. In verse 7 leading up to our study passage, Malachi states that his people have “turned aside” from God’s statutes. What does turning away from God indicate about the spiritual state of the people of Judah? How serious is this to God? (see v.6) How do the people view their relationship with God? (v.7)

    2. What charge does Malachi bring against the people of Judah? What were the circumstances within their country that should have tipped off the people about their broken relationship with God? (see v.10-11)

    3. What does the phrase, “the whole nation” (v.9) tell us about the seriousness and the scope of the problem?

    4. What is God’s command and promise to Judah? (v.10-11)
     
    5. How is Malachi’s message fundamentally tied to God’s plan for all of the nations? (see Gen. 12:1-3)

    6. What is the message that Malachi’s people need to grasp? What is the change that needs to be made and how is change brought about?
  • Oct 26, 2014Take Heart!
    Oct 26, 2014
    Take Heart!
    Series: Various
    Pastor Deric's sermon this week is entitled "Take Heart!" from John 16:33. A response to all that has happened this week in our world.
    Questions: Please read John 16:33 1.  Read John 16:25-33 and explain the context in your own words. Talk about how it relates to our lives as Christians in 2014. 2.  What evidence is there in verse 33 that Jesus isn’t an “escape” from troubled times?  Elaborate and discuss. 3.  How does a Christian experience peace in a world of tribulation according to verse 33?  (see Colossians 3:15; Philippians 4:6-7) 4.  Why is Jesus instruction to “take heart” so appropriate for a Christian? 5.  How has Jesus overcome the world? What does that mean? 6.  What is our role as Christians in a world that is descending increasingly into chaos and violence?
  • Oct 19, 2014The Selfishness of Shallow Worship
    Oct 19, 2014
    The Selfishness of Shallow Worship
    Pastor Deric continues our new series entitled "Our Generous God" a Stewardship Series. This week his sermon is on Isaiah 58 entitled "The Selfishness of Shallow Worship."

    Questions:
    Please read Isaiah 58.

    Now, begin by re-reading verses 3 to 5.

     
    1. God was commanding the prophet to give His reproofs to His people in a powerful and pressing manner. What was so wrong? What is the warning here for us? What does God identify as the basic troubling issue?
     
    2. What place does fasting have in a life of faith, and what are some of the obvious conclusions you can draw from this text about your attitude while fasting? Give Scripture examples to back your answers.
     
    3. God’s people were engaged in religious form (going to church, praying, fasting, having devotions, etc), yet God did not hear them or acknowledge their “worship.” What was the problem? (Rev 3:17; Matt 7:21-23)
     
    4. Identify and elaborate on the specific behaviours in verses 3 and 4 that God points to as evidence of their hypocrisy.

    5. What is God describing in verse 5?

    Now, re-read verses 6 to 12.

    6. What is the overall teaching that is being conveyed?

    7. Explain and elaborate on what each point of God’s fast may mean to us today. Give biblical examples to support your ideas.

    8. Discuss the many way the Lord promises to replenish and transform our lives as a result of fasting the way He prescribes.

    9. What will be the final result according to verse 12?
  • Oct 12, 2014More Than Enough
    Oct 12, 2014
    More Than Enough
    Pastor Deric continues our new series entitled "Our Generous God" a Stewardship Series. This week his sermon is on Exodus 35 and 36 entitled "More Than Enough."

    Questions:
    Please read Exodus 35 and 36 twice through.
    1. What detail in Exodus 35:5 changes the nature of Israel’s contribution to build the Tabernacle? How does this principle apply to the church today? Can you support your idea from Scripture?   

    2. Exodus 35:21 describes the people as being “stirred” and “moved” in their giving.  What does that mean? Do you feel that way about being generous to God’s work?  (Compare Rev. 3:15-18)
     
    3. Exodus 35:22 explains that the people were moved to give “willingly.” What does their willingness communicate to us? (see 2 Cor 9:7; compare 2 Chron 35:8)  
     
    4. The “sub-plot” in this narrative is the revelation about the condition of the people’s hearts (v. 5, 21, 22, 26, 29). They had a heart for God and His work. It is a heart response that God cares about more than anything else. How does this apply to our lives today? (see Prov 21:2;  1 Sam 16:7)

    5. How do you explain the concept of being “commanded” to participate in God’s work in Exodus 35:10 and the “free-will” participation of God’s people emphasized in this story?  

    6. Chapter 35:23-24; 31, and chapter 36:2 explain that the people gave according to the abilities that God gave them. How does that apply to our giving practices? (see 2 Cor 8:7-12)
     
    7. Exodus 36:7 states that Israel “had more than enough” to complete the work that God gave them to do. How is the story an example of the words of the famous missionary to China, Hudson Taylor: “God’s work done in God’s way will never lack God’s supply?” What does this story remind you about God’s ability to meet your need? (see Phil 4:19)
  • Oct 5, 2014Giving Back to Yourself
    Oct 5, 2014
    Giving Back to Yourself
    Pastor Deric continues our new series entitled "Our Generous God" a Stewardship Series. This week his sermon is on Luke 6:27-38 entitled "Giving Back to Yourself."

    Questions:
    Please read Luke 6:27-38 several times through.
    1. What is the significance of Jesus’ use of “love” (agape) to this overall passage?

    2. Jesus instructs us, “love your enemies” in verse 27. What is the the first step in obedience to Jesus and how would this change how we think, act and live?

    3. Is it possible to fake this kind of love? How do we know love is genuine?

    4. What is the principle in verse 30 that Jesus wants His followers to adopt? What guides and governs a giving heart?

    5. God is the ultimate example of a good gift giver. How are some ways His giving differs from ours?

    6. According to verses 32 to 35, what is it that sets the Christian apart from the unbeliever?

    7. In verse 35, Jesus gives us directions on how to live this way. What are His orders to us?  What will the result be?

    8. How does Jesus describe a forgiven follower in verse 37?

    9. What is the connection between “giving” and “getting” that is being taught from this entire paragraph?

    Click here for a PDF version of the Digging Deeper questions
  • Sep 28, 2014Our Generous God
    Sep 28, 2014
    Our Generous God
    This week Pastor Deric starts a new series entitled "Our Generous God" a Stewardship Series. He kicks off the series with a sermon on James 1:16-18.

    Questions:
    Please read James 1:16-18 twice.
    1. According to the passage you just read, what is the most destructive lie that Satan can use to disrupt our faith in God?

    2. From verses 12-18, summarize in your own words how God’s goodness is contrasted with evil.

    3. How can a Christian who is described as “walking in the light” (1John 1:7), be susceptible to deception? (v.16)

    4. If every good and perfect gift is from above (v.17), where do “evil” gifts come from? How do the words “every good and perfect gift” defend and support God’s generosity?

    5. Has there ever been a circumstance in your life where you doubted the goodness of God and wondered about His generosity? Share if you are willing.

    6. What fundamental difference between God and mankind does James describe towards the end of verse 17?

    7. What is the greatest gift a human being can receive from God, and how does it relate to James’ teaching in this passage?
  • Sep 21, 2014“Farewell.” A Ministry Map from Acts 20
    Sep 21, 2014
    “Farewell.” A Ministry Map from Acts 20
    Series: Various
    This week Pastor Deric share a special message to kick off our ministry year from Acts 20:17-38 entitled "Farewell. A Ministry Map from Acts 20". Questions: Please read Acts 20:17-38 1. Who is Paul serving according to vs.18-19 and what does it have to do with his ministry to the church at Ephesus?   2. What are the two major components of Paul’s teaching ministry that are highlighted in vs.21 and why are they important?   3. Why was Paul committed to going to Jerusalem? vs.22-24   4. Explain why Paul’s view of himself is important to the progress of the Gospel? vs.24   5. What makes us “innocent of the blood of all men” according to vs.26-27? 6. Who are the “wolves” that Paul warned about in vs.29-30 and how does a congregation recognize them? 7. Who ultimately is responsible for the well being of a local congregation according to Paul’s farewell address to the elders at Ephesus? Compare verses 28-32. 8. How is it more blessed to give than to receive? vs.35   9. What does the “kneeling, praying, weeping, embracing and kissing” (vs.36-38) tell you about the bond that exists between believers in a local church? Click here for a PDF version of the Digging Deeper questions
  • Sep 14, 2014God So Loves The World
    Sep 14, 2014
    God So Loves The World
    Series: Various
    This week Pastor Deric share a special message from John 3:16-18 entitled "For God So Loves The World" as we celebrate Baptism Sunday where 10 people are getting baptized. Questions: Please read John 3:9 to 3:21 twice through. 1. What is the significance of the phrase, “for God so loved the world” to the people of John’s time? What about it’s significance today? 2. What is it about Jesus that we are to believe? 3. How should we understand the truth that God “sent” Jesus into the world? Who else has been sent into the world? What are the similarities and differences? 4. How is it that we are saved “though Him”? (also see v.14) 5. What is it that distinguishes the condemned from the saved? Why is that such a serious offense? 6. What was the burden on John’s heart that moved him to write this passage of Scripture?
  • Aug 31, 2014The Original Storm Chaser
    Aug 31, 2014
    The Original Storm Chaser
    Series: Various
    This week Pastor Deric share a special message from Mark 4:35-41 entitled "The Original Storm Chaser" where Jesus calms the storm before the very eyes of his disciples. Questions: Please read Mark 4:35-41. 1. What significance is it that Jesus requested the voyage across the water? (v.35) 2. How did the disciples respond to Jesus’ request? What does the fact that there were “other boats” along on the voyage suggest? (v.36) 3. Knowing the background of the disciples, what does verse 37 tell us about the severity of the storm? 4. Why would the disciples have reacted so harshly to Jesus? (v.38) What had the disciples placed their confidence in? 5. What was Jesus demonstrating to the disciples with His calm in the midst of the storm? What was driving the disciples fear? What lesson is Jesus sharing with His disciples? (v.39-40) [See Exodus 14:13; 20:20 for additional insights]. 6. How did the disciples react to Jesus’ calming of the storm? What was the reason for this reaction in the disciples? (v.41)
    7. Read Mark 9:6 and 16:8. What similarities do you see in the disciples reactions? Compare that to Revelation 1:17.
  • Apr 19, 2014The Message & Mission of the Church
    Apr 19, 2014
    The Message & Mission of the Church
    Series: Easter
    Pastor Deric shares with us an special Easter message from John 20:19-23 entitled "The Message & Mission of the Church" on Easter Sunday at the Living Arts Centre.

    Questions
    Read John 20:19-23
    1. In the light of Jesus’ life, and His death on the cross, what is the significance of Jesus’ resurrection? What difference does it make to you that Jesus lives?

    2. To say the least, it had been a tumultuous week for Jesus, and especially His disciples. After reading v.19, place yourself in their sandals and describe their emotions and thoughts at this time leading up to v.19a. What had Jesus promised them some time earlier? (John 16:20)

    3. Read v.20. Describe the disciples initial reaction to seeing Jesus standing before them. (see Luke 24:36-43) What did Jesus do that changed them, and brought about their second reaction?

    4. Read v.21-22. Jesus brings clarity to the purpose for which He had called His disciples. How might the disciples understand their purpose now? What might have been their natural reaction to His statement? How could the Holy Spirit have changed their understanding?

    5. Does Jesus get your attention with the statement, “as the Father has sent me, even so I am sending you”? What implications do you see regarding your own life?

    6. How do you understand John’s instructions to the disciples in v. 23? Do we have the power to forgive sin? What is John saying?

    7. After digging deeper into the events of the resurrection, what does the statement, “Jesus is Lord” mean to you?
    8. All believers are commissioned by Jesus to do the work of making disciples. How do you maintain your career / job, and fulfill this command of Jesus?
  • Apr 13, 2014Your Are Being Called
    Apr 13, 2014
    Your Are Being Called
    Pastor Deric continues his series from 1 Peter entitled "The House that God is Building." This week the message is from 1 Peter 2:21-25 entitled "You Are Being Called"

    Questions
    Read 1 Peter 2:21-25
    1. In your own words, to what have you “been called”?

    2. When we follow Jesus’ example, what does this reveal about our life and our attitude? (v.23 b) How do you react to the prospect of suffering for Jesus sake? What does Peter say about this in 1Peter 4:13-14?

    3. Read the 12 verses of Isaiah 53. It seems apparent that Peter had these verses in mind when he wrote this passage. From v.22-25, find the quote and the allusions to Isaiah 53.

    4. How did Jesus respond to the unjust treatment He received? (v.23)   What would our instinctive response be to such treatment? What would these responses indicate about “who we depend on” in times of crisis?  Who did Jesus depend on?

    5. In v.24, Peter reminds us of the heart of the Gospel, “He bore our sins in His body on the tree.” According to Peter, why did Jesus do that? How does Peter’s answer to this question relate back to our necessary response to unjust treatment?
    6. Peter has reminded us that we are called to a difficult calling. Remembering the points from Pastor Deric’s lesson on Sunday, how can we “answer the call” that Peter identified and Jesus modelled for our lives?
  • Apr 6, 2014You Are God’s People
    Apr 6, 2014
    You Are God’s People
    Pastor Deric continues his series from 1 Peter entitled "The House that God is Building." This week the message is from 1 Peter 2:10-20 entitled "You Are God's People"

    Questions
    1. Read v.10-12. Who are the “beloved” that Peter refers to and what makes them “sojourners and exiles”?

    2. The fact that Peter implores the beloved to “abstain” from these passions, carries a significant implication about our ability to resist sin. What is the implication?

    3. How does the Christian “wage war” against the desires of the flesh?

    4. What may result from living a life of honourable conduct among the “gentiles”? (v.12)

    5. Read v.13-17. Why should we “be subject” to “every human institution”? What about institutions that are led by leaders that are not believers or are morally bankrupt? (see Rom 13:1-7) Are there any exceptions to this?

    6. The text implies active participation in the political institutions of our day. Why are believers often tempted to neglect their civic duties? (see Matt 22:15-21)

    7. How does God intend for us to silence the foolish and the slanderer? (v.15-17)

    8. Read v.18-20. Peter calls believers to a difficult level of obedience. What confidence enables the Christian to endure difficult circumstances and even mistreatment? What does this confidence and ability to endure                hardship say about the believers’ faith?
    9. So in the light of what we’ve studied and learned this week, how do we live this way? What are we to do? Give examples of how Acts 5:29 will apply.
  • Mar 23, 2014Proclaiming the Excellencies of God’s Big House!
    Mar 23, 2014
    Proclaiming the Excellencies of God’s Big House!
    Pastor Deric continues his series from 1 Peter entitled "The House that God is Building." This week the message is from 1 Peter 2:3-10 entitled "Proclaiming the Excellencies of God's Big House!"

    Questions
    1. Reading from v.4, what are some images that come to mind where we read that Christ is, “a living stone rejected by men but in the sight of God chosen and precious”?

    2. Earlier in v.4 it says we “come to Him”. How would you describe this call to ‘draw near’ to Christ the living cornerstone?

    3. In v.5 Peter says we are “like living stones.” As Christ is a “living stone”, what implications does Peter’s description of us now suggest to you?

    4. Peter goes on to say we are “a spiritual house” and “a holy priesthood” offering “spiritual sacrifices.” (v.5) How is this possible for us?

    5. There is a history of visible evidence of God’s presence among His people. Examine these examples of God’s presence in Scripture. (Ex. 13:21-22; Ex. 33:8-13; 40:34-38; 1Kings 8:10-11; Jn. 1:14; Jn. 2:19) How is the visible presence of God evidenced in the world today?

    6. Peter cites Isaiah 28:16 in v.6. In your own words, how is Peter applying this Scripture? What has God done?

    7. In v.6, Peter states that those who believe in Christ, “will not be put to shame.” In v.7-8, the other shoe drops. How do you understand, “a stone of stumbling and a rock of offense”?

    8. How should we best understand the end of v.8 where Peter says, “as they were destined to do”? (Eph. 1:4; 2 Pet. 2:3; Jude 4; Acts 13:48; Rom. 8:29-30; 9:14-24)

    9. Reading in v.9, who are the “chosen race” the “royal priesthood, a holy nation”? Describe some of the implications your answer carries with it.
    10. In v.10 Peter contrasts our former standing with our present blessing. What is your response to this truth? How are you working out your response today?
  • Mar 16, 2014Letters from Heaven
    Mar 16, 2014
    Letters from Heaven
    Pastor Deric continues his series from 1 Peter entitled "The House that God is Building." This week the message is from 1 Peter 1:22-2:3 entitled "Letters From Heaven"

    Questions
    1. What is Peter’s point in distinguishing between “perishable seed” and “imperishable”? (v.23) What is Peter saying about the nature of our faith? On what basis does Peter make this claim?

    2. Peter cites Isaiah 40:6 in vv.24-25. What is Peter emphasizing here by using this quote? Can you think of any implications these verses might have regarding our understanding of evangelism? Your role? God’s role?

    3. As we read and understand the earlier verses, why are we to “put away” malice, deceit, hypocrisy, envy and slander mentioned in 2:1?

    4. Just as a newborn infant cries for milk, what is it that Peter implies we should long for? (v.2) What does desire or longing for God’s Word have to do with the Christian life? Can’t we just read and study the Bible as a matter of discipline?

    5. What does Peter mean (v.3) that we have “tasted” that the Lord is good? How do you taste something that is invisible?

    Personal Application: What evidence do you see in your own life that you are growing in your salvation experience?

  • Mar 2, 2014Ask and It Will Be Given to You!
    Mar 2, 2014
    Ask and It Will Be Given to You!
    Pastor Deric continues his series from 1 Peter entitled "The House that God is Building." This week the message is from 1 Peter 1:17-25 entitled "Ask and it Will Be Given to You!"

    Questions
    1. If you could ask God for anything, what would it be?

    2. In verse 17, Peter describes the church reaching out to God as a call to Him as our Father. What two aspects of being a Christian are highlighted in that statement?

    3. Read vv.18-19. It says we, “were ransomed from the futile ways inherited from our forefathers…” In your words, what does “ransomed” mean? Name 3 implication your definition suggests.

    4. In verse 19 Peter reminds us that God paid a very high price for us. What does that say about God the Father? Jesus Christ, His Son? You and me?

    5. Peter paints an extremely vivid picture of the Gospel in verses 18-22. What makes that makes that Gospel so compelling to us?

    6. In Verse 20, Pastor Deric explained that the word “foreknown” refers not only to knowing in advance but also actively working out His plan through eternity. How does this truth impact your understanding of your role in God’s ongoing plan?
    7. Read vv. 22-25. In the previous verses Peter has called us to be holy. Now with souls purified by “obedience to the truth” we are to, “love one another earnestly from a pure heart…” How could we see this love in our families? In our church? How could evidence of this kind of love impact the community we live, go to school and work in?